Death of the Nuclear Weapon

 

The following assessment is based on my psychic abilities, and should be read in that vein.

The death of the nuclear weapon began in May 2017 and ended in June 2017. 

On 9th May 2017, the US Navy ship the USS Lake Champlain, a guided missile cruiser, collided with a South Korean fishing vessel in the international waters off Asia. A month earlier, it had been conducting exercises with other US and Japan naval ships as a show of force in the midst of heightened nuclear tensions with North Korea (San Diego Tribune, 9th Mau 2017). Both ships were able to travel safely onwards to port for repairs following the May incident.

Then, on 16th June, 2.30pm (local time, Japan), the USS Fitzgerald collided with a Philippine-flagged container ship 56 nautical miles south-west of Yokosuka, Japan. It had recently been fitted with an upgraded electronic satellite and nuclear system, and these were destroyed in the collision.

These two seemingly discrete incidents are closely connected, the first bringing the US and NATO computer-based defence system to its knees (in May 2017), while the second event then rendered it wholly inoperable (in June that same year).  

My psychic conjecture is that the collisions were the result of advancements in electronic warfare by a powerful Eastern state. These were used to jam the US naval and NATO’s nuclear weapons systems and communications satellites, and take over the naval ships’ command through remote access, thereby bringing them into collision.

The Eastern power behind the death of the nuclear weapon has thus asserted its technological superiority over the west and its warfare capabilities. In doing so, it has assumed a position of almost unassailable power and influence, which is already bringing about embryonic – but by all accounts, seismic – geopolitical transformations with far-reaching consequences.

Firstly, it was able to use its influence to move North and South Korea towards rapprochement, as evidenced by the historic meeting between their leaders on 27th April 2018 and their announcement of the Panmunjom Declaration for Peace, Prosperity and Unification – and complete de-nuclearisation – of the Korean peninsula.

That the North Korean leader stepped into the South, without causing humiliation or insult towards his South Korean counterpart, is testament to the guiding hand of the Eastern power who encouraged Kim Jong-un to send a delegation to participate in the Winter Olympics under a shared flag with South Korea.

The unification of Korea, some 65 years after the armistice that brought the war there to an end, will mark a significant shift in the geopolitics of the region. For sworn enemies to become comrades indicates there were no real deep differences between them at all, only those created and maintained by the USA, and the west more generally.

This augurs badly for the USA, who on top of having their entire nuclear weapons system over-rided, will in time announce their complete military withdrawal from the region, on the basis that Japan is capable of defending itself and that military presence is a cumbersome financial drain on the US budget.

The second repercussion of the Eastern power’s demonstrable strength and superiority over the USA and the west is that it is spurring a reassessment and realignment of allegiances in another region of the world that has – similar to Korea – been locked in seemingly intractable conflict under the aegis of the west.

Together, the transformation of formerly intransigent theatres of conflict – in and beyond Korea – into newfound allies is creating a real and deep-seated fear amongst western powers that peace will break out, and even worse, will be sustained.  

Yet it is entirely in keeping with the Eastern power’s strength and prowess twinned with its maturity that it will not announce its role as master power-broker. Instead, it is allowing the US – and the inimitable figure of Trump – to enjoy the accolade of brokering peace in Korea. 

Indeed, the historic milestone in Korea’s history represented by the rapprochement and de-nuclearisation promises of its two leaders, could not have been possible without Donald Trump’s election as US President. Here is an ill-disciplined businessman who has all the reliability, veracity, integrity and loyalty of a rat. His idea of governance is to scream, shout and hurl sarcastic abuse to all and sundry. He runs his government like a business and a fiefdom.

Only a non-career politician, such as Trump, could be sucked into an armed theatre by a national enemy and allow its advanced, human-controlled artifical intelligence warfare systems render a death-blow to his nation’s entire naval operation in Honolulu.

A seasoned politician would not have been baited into a war footing against a surrogate puppet state and allow an enemy to deal such a decisive and geopolitically transformative blow against his own country and NATO. It took a Nazi-styled, racist, redneck, white supremacist – Trump, basically – to answer the provocation offered by North Korea’s missile testing plans.

Trump, and the west, will be left to bask in the glory of the Korean peace deal, while I believe that they surely must know that this is small consolation for the fact that they have been overwhelmed by the superior technological power of a global opponent. The latter is happy for history to be written in this way, such is its confidence in its own geopolitical power and status.

The ascent of an Eastern plane and perspective of power importantly heralds the end of a race-dominated global agenda; and we must hope that based on recent developments in the Korean peninsula it also marks a significant move from hate- to care-politics, far removed from the subjugation-mentality of the race-Europeans.

If we need reminding of what the Eastern power has achieved as a result of its mastery of sophisticated electronic artificial intelligence – and the capability this gave them to rout the US Navy and its nuclear weapons system – we need only look at the fate of Russia.

Russia has achieved none of the mastery that might give it leverage over the US and the west. As a consequence, it has replaced the so-called ‘war on terrorism’ and Islamists as the prime bogeyman used by western states to keep their citizens in a state of fear. Controlling citizens’ fears, subjugating them in this way, is a critical bulwark of western political praxis. Western states distrust their citizens so deeply, and are themselves so fearful of being called to account by them for their failures in government, that they create external bogeymen to help maintain their citizens in a controlled and cooperative state that diverts them from attacking their own leaders.

Consider how a Russia asylum seeker and his daughter, who were allegedly poisoned using the deadliest nerve agent ever developed, managed to survive the massive biological damage that it caused, and live. Notwithstanding that these two people and their fates amount to nothing more than collateral damage in the eyes of both the west and Russia, it remains the fact that an immediate death would have put a quick and abrupt end to the global media frenzy that the UK – and subsequently its western partners – needed in order to make Russia an effective bogeyman that would keep its citizens’ interest and emotion diverted from other governance failures and weaknesses. 

The Eastern power that has manouevred itself into a position of primary geopolitical influence has eluded such a fate. It is now primed to create seismic geopolitical shake-ups of a kind that, while not unprecedented, are not part of living political memory.  

 

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