Bhindrawale: an alternative view

‘The Sikhs are the only race, that I know of, who sacrificed their own nationhood in order to free the non-Sikh population of India from more than one thousand years of humiliation, subjugation and occupation at the hands of not just one but two (Semitic) Empires. They did so having fought for and secured their own independence as a nation under Islam rule more than 200 years earlier.’ Avtar

For you to appreciate this hard-hitting essay I need to explore, examine, and briefly lay bare what is a Sikh.

It is a misnomer that being born into a practicing Sikh family makes you a Sikh. Certainly, children practice the rites and ritual of Sikhi. But that is learned behaviour. Even when mimicking their elders, and perhaps even aspiring to be a proper Sikh through such mimicry, children are not Sikh in the metaphysical sense.

A Sikh, as I have written countless times, is a strata above the realm of advanced Sants, Svamis, Sufis, and Saints. A sant is one who has absolute mastery over the psychic realm. A Sikh is responsible for the welfare of the sant realm.

At the times of, and attendant in seva to, the ten Sikh Gurus, (and due to the high originality of advanced innovation), a Sikh was an unbelievably calm pacifist, who, when required, would to lay to rest a repeat killer. The Sikhs of those times never had need to raise their voice. Their psychic bearing and presence was enough.

Bear in mind, in those times artificial voice projecting apparatuses such as the megaphone and later the mic and loudspeaker system, had not yet been developed. So, an orator of that period, regardless of faith, literally had to shout to get his message across. Shouting behaviour has not died, in India at least. People there seem to forget that they are using microphones, and can therefore speak gently. The screaming and shouting automatically raises one’s blood pressure, heightens one’s nervous system activity, and leads to a tensed physiology, which renders one primed for a physical confrontation. The person sounds and behaves assertively.

Another problem of the birth-Sikhs is that they are reared on stories of historical events that highlight bravery, courage, chivalry, and heroism. These are stories of fighting the odds and succeeding, more often than not. However, the Sikh parent imparting such stories is themselves not a Sikh in its full reality, but like their child a Sikh by birth only. And therein lies the problem of Sikhism.

A Sikh is one who, coming from any faith, is the master of, and has hands-on responsibility for, those who are an authority over the so-called spiritual world. That was what separated the Sikhs of the Gurus from the faithful of all other faiths.

Only the best of the best, the most humble of the humble, found a way to be in the seva of the Sikh Gurus. Some attributes of a Sikh:

* An analyser, scrutiniser, and improver…of whatever they may confront

* Addressing every female as ‘Ma’am’ and treating every female with dignity, chivalry, and lack of misogyny

* Studies war tactics and stealth strategy

* Master of hand-arms combat

* Outmanoeuvers opponents strategically

* Sikh men/women are regarded as tender, passionate, sensual lovers by most South Asians

* Remain faithful and loyal to one partner

* Their word is sacrosanct

Only with the above clarity will you be able understand today’s essay.

Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale

According to web searches he was born Jarnail Singh Brar on 2nd June 1947, and he died on 6th June 1984 aged 37. Leader of Damdami Taksal, one of the five formal seats of Sikhism, he was an outspoken orator. He voiced the resentment of the ordinary Sikh about their betrayal by the Hindus: leading up to and even after India’s independence, the Hindus had promised a separate Sikh nation; they reneged on this promise.

His popularity stemmed from his insistence that the faithful remain vigilant, and abide by the high requirements of the elite Sikhs, the Khalsa. Like the majority of Sikhs, he saw the events of bygone times through rose-tinted glasses, rather than accepting that society has always been a multi-spectrum of misfits who dally with idealism and bemoan the failures of others.

The majority of Sikh ‘leaders’ increasingly fail to appreciate what it takes to become a Sikh, and that there are unbelievably high standards of advanced knowledge required to progress into the Khalsa realm. The same was true of Bhindranwale, except that in his case his heart was in the right place. Like other leaders, though, he was not advanced enough to recognise the what or the why that makes a Sikh and the Khalsa uniquely responsible and thus special.

An insight: The sublime is experienced by nearly all practicing Sikhs as a faith-right; however, collectively, it remains an unquantifiable realm. They are moved and ‘protected’ by this arena, but they are oblivious as to how best to describe its existence, or the experiences it yields.

He was precisely in the same boat as your average run-of-the-mill Sikh. Like them, he too sensed, but he could not explain the sensation.

He was a doer, a go-getter, one who could not sit still. He readily took a stance against anything or anyone whom he considered to have fallen from the excellence he thought all Sikhs should live by. Drugs, a hedonistic lifestyle, and irreverence for the image of the perceived Sikh status quo rankled him. His generation blamed all society’s ills on the wealth that Panjab enjoyed as the green, agricultural energy-field of India. Panjab literally fed, and to this day feeds, India. This brought prosperity.

Prosperity in tandem with zero pressure of either local wars or impending invasions, led to parents showering their children with monetary gifts hitherto unheard of in India. Sikhs were, and are, massively wealthy compared to the rest of the non-west European world. In fact, when I traveled the countries that were at that time locked behind the iron curtain almost twenty years after leaving Panjab, I was shocked to see those countries suffering from lower, weaker, almost non-existent infrastructure; and the local poverty was breathtakingly shocking even in comparison to the Panjab of twenty years earlier.

So, Panjab was wealthy. Wealthy enough to send members of their family to study abroad, and indeed to live abroad; these members in turn sending remittances back to the family village and home, thereby increasing the family’s earning and power-prestige further.

The handicap of wealth is improved health. Health, married to wealth, automatically childs conceit, self-importance and delusions of the self as an omnipotent being. Sikhs of his time suffered from the same disease of the avant-garde, technicolour palette of romanticism seducing monologue, with philosophies spiced with short-lived interactions with European industrial civilisation.

In a mixture of multi-complex rationales, he laced his oratory skills with the insistence that wealthy Sikhs ought to pressure their children towards the rites normally associated with a Sikh monastic lifestyle. Its conditions are so confusing to an outsider, especially when each male is meant to see each woman as his sister or mother, yet be anxiously prepared to marry one of these very women, and thereafter, to engage in and enjoy a full sexual life with her. It’s a case of heads I win, tails you cannot live a normal lifestyle, unless you marry. These rich kids, emasculated by the parental pressure he advocated, threw tantrums.

He, meanwhile, gained fame and popularity. For he constantly evoked age-old glories of sword-fighting, small hand-arms defence, and overcoming outrageous odds against trained armies of invaders, or indeed against ‘home grown’ newly settled Muslim rulers. He drew crowds. He spoke uncompromisingly, mired in passion as if he had returned fresh from sword-fighting and hand-to-hand combat. Sikhs so love tales of hand-to-hand combat against overwhelming odds…his popularity increased exponentially. However, he had never set a foot on a battlefield, and he had no formal or informal military and tactical training.

He was an orator, one who had the ability to inflame his audience. He evoked passions. His message stirred people. He became an irresistible force. This drew the attention of the politicians. However kitsch he appeared to seasoned politicians nevertheless he commanded a sizeable vote bank that they couldn’t ignore. So, his ego was massaged, and seduction-hypocrisy gained momentum. Everything has a price. He had a price. It was a matter of identifying that price and leveraging him into the politicians’ pocket.

His price?

A date with destiny, a reluctant delusion that he was ‘chosen’ to deliver respect, along with self-determination to Sikhs within the statehood of a collective India.

Expatriate Sikhs stoked, inflamed, and financially supported calls for an independent state named Khalistan (and not Panjab). I truthfully cannot recall him advancing that particular idea, but the theme of self-determination never left his lips. In reality, all he sought – and as is the demand of all Sikhs – was dignity via the fulfillment of a promise; and the honest barter of that promise made to Sikhs by Pandit Nehru and (Mohan Dass Gandhi) Mahatama Gandhi, in the days before India’s independence.

This set him on a collision course. Prime Minister Indira Gandhi stepped into the ring and offered a staged, well-practiced trade-off; stopping short of Sikh demands for the fulfillment of the Anandpur Sahib Resolution.

A dance of Shiva had begun.

Death was on the cards.

Each thought it would be the other’s.

The death drum gathered speed.

And he made one naive mistake after another. He miscalculated the world of politics. In fact, he had zero appreciation of politics. He did not understand that you cut a tree for firewood one day and the next day you stand on its stump delivering a speech pronouncing your credentials as an ecologist.

His lack of military service became evident in his utterances. He took the bait. He prepared to take on the might of the Indian army’s modern weaponry and tactics with his handful of men equipped with small arms weapons. He was neither a politician, nor a strategist or tactician. His popularity was based on his honesty, earnestness and frankness. He lacked guile. He lacked deceit. He lacked hypocrisy. He lacked cunning. What he said was what he meant. Wonderful attributes for a religious orator. But as a politician and military tactician he was a dead duck.

If he had had a cunning mind, then he would and could have instigated a war between Pakistan and India. This would have brought the Sikh regiments stationed far afield from Panjab back to the border with Pakistan, which in the main is shared by Pakistan and Panjab. Simultaneously, he would, on the quiet, have had his own followers present in various cities ready to occupy main-frame buildings; the armed occupation of which would have put him in control of mass broadcast, and of transportation, thereby causing maximum and immediate mayhem among the people. Thereafter, he could have incited the Sikh regiments to support his quest for the negotiation of the Anandpur Sahib Resolution from a position of reasonable strength. Just for the fun of creating discord and facilitating the possible breakup of India, Pakistan would have supported him to the hilt, politically and militarily.

However, he did what no Sikh army had done in Sikh history. He occupied the holy shrine of Amritsar not for its protection from an imminent attack but for sheltering in. After all, prior to his occupation Amritsar was under absolutely no threat from an imminent Indian army attack.

A majority of expatriate Sikhs were against his occupation of Amritsar. Yes, he had supporters, but they were a minority, albeit a vocal one.

The outcome?

A foregone conclusion.

A mere formality.

He totally played into the hands of the politicians.

The rest is history.

I witnessed the events here in the UK, and am shocked by how many of the people who ridiculed him at the time, including his lack of education, now address him as a glorified, proud, fearless Sikh General.

Yes, they call him General!

He was an innocent man, honest and sincere as the day is long. But a General? Are Sikhs really that desperate that they equate his tactics with those of a General? I absolutely will credit him with fearlessness, courage and strength of character. He did not sell himself short. But a General? Come on, please, you Sikhs can do better than that. Give him plaudits, but let us not get carried away with overly emotional praise either.

Having said that, for me as a Sikh, he gave me the one thing no one else had delivered up to that point.

Let me explain.

While traveling Europe I would come across veterans of the first and the second European war (1914-18 and 1939-45) who many a time would present themselves to me as admirers of the Sikh soldiers and battalion, and who would salute me as an orthodox young Sikh. Apart for these European war veterans, everyone else would confuse me for an Arab, Muslim or indeed a Hindu. I was never recognised as a Sikh.

Because of this sincere, honest, earnest Sikh preacher, today I am recognised globally as a Sikh, part of a nation of people who gave up their own kingdom, their country, in order to free India.

My nation, a people I am proud to call my own, the Sikhs, made a selfless sacrifice foregoing their own nation for the sake of securing freedom for what is now more than a billion people in India.

Yes, the ruling classes cheated us out of a promise. But that is the political Hindu for you. The citizen Hindu and Muslim of India, by contrast, categorically maintains that we do deserve our own statehood. I thank them for their support.

Yet in today’s India, the arrogance of some Hindu politicians is leading them to proclaim that all citizens of India are Hindus.

I once again want to remind them that ‘Hindu’ is neither a race nor a religion.

Hindi is a communal language of communication that slowly gathered momentum following its birth just over one hundred and fifty years after the establishment of Sikhism.

Hindi is like the fabled pan-European language Esperanto. Nothing more and nothing less.

And as for Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale: Sikhs, he was a seasoned preacher, a Giani. He was not a Sant in any shape or form. Please, let us not get over emotional about his credentials. Let us be sincere in our evaluation.

As a Giani, what he achieved for Sikhism is that which the best amongst us will never be able to emulate or attain. He gave me global recognition, a global presence. And, no, I do not accept the excuse that globally, in the age of the internet, race Europeans mistake me for a Muslim. The truth is that they hate me because of the colour of my skin – pure and simple. It is race and culture hatred that they exercise. And the easiest way to murder me is to call me a Muslim. Race Europeans are neither that ignorant nor that stupid that they cannot tell me apart from a Muslim. Exactly how many Muslims in the western world walk around with their traditional very loose cloth wound around their heads? I have only ever seen three in all my years of living in race European countries.

So, the fact that the world now views me as a Sikh must be credited entirely to this one, very basically educated, sincere orator/preacher, who merely wanted the dignity and self-esteem of the Sikhs to be respected by the Hindu Government – the very Hindus who until 1946 had been slaves in their own land for just a little over one thousand years.

Sikhs deserve their dignity and self-esteem to be respected by the Hindu Government of India.

And on the anniversary death of this preacher I hope and pray it will begin to accept a world where Sikhs, Muslims, Buddhist, Jains, Christians and Hindus can live in peace with each other in the land we now call India: as autonomous cultures, languages, heritages, and dignities that together protect our collective defence, economy and infrastructure as these exist now.

 

 

Meditation within: Mechanical Time, Organic Time & Timelessness (German Time Vs Brexit Time)

European concept of time:

On 31st December 1899, a second was determined to be 1/31, 556,952.9747th of a mean solar day. In 1955, the second was re-calculated, using the caesium beam atomic clock, as 1/86,400th of a mean solar day. The present European concept of time was set then, in 1955. The quantum clock led to the femtosecond which is to a second what a second is to 31.71 million years, and to an attosecond, which is to a second what a second is to 31.71 billion years. That clock was superseded in 2015 by an optical lattice clock.

However, earth’s rotation, in conjunction with the galaxy and the universe, is irregular and slowing down, and the mechanical clock is utterly dysfunctional with and irrelevant to bio-organic time phase.

Arya concept of time:

Yuga:-

There are four yugas – Satya, Treta, Dvapara, and Kali. These each have a pre-determined duration lasting millions of years, and they follow each other cyclically. A cycle comprising the four yugas is known as a maha-yuga. Within this is the life span of the earthlings, demi-gods (please check wikipedia for a list of Arya and Greek demi-gods), and gods (Brahma etc).

Satya yuga – 1,728,000 years – golden age

Trata yuga – 1,296,000 years – silver age

Dvapara yuga – 0,864,000 years – bronze age

Kali yuga – 0,432,000 years – iron age

1 Maha yuga – 4,320,000 years

 

The Maha yuga is cyclical in both descending and ascending phase.

 

71 Maha yuga = 1 Manvantara (destruction and then recreation)

1000 Maha yuga = 1 kalpa (night of Brahma)

1000 Maha yuga = 1 Kalpa (day of Brahma)

1 day of demi gods = 360 earth days

 

Demi-Gods live for 100 years of their time scale, and are offspring of gods and humans.

Brahma lives for 100 years of its time scale, dies, after which a new Brahma evolves.

(It should to be noted that the Arya resuscitated the existence of the decimal point and the zero, without which astronomical calculations were impossible. They also re-established negative indices and algebraic rules).

Similar to modern timescales the Arya had a name for sub-atomic units of time and based their calculations on that understanding, called paramanu, where:

2 Paramanus = 1 Anu

3 Anu = 1 Trasarenu

3 Trasarenus = 1 Truti

100 Trutis = 1 Vedha

3 Vedha = 1 Lava

3 Lavas = 1 Nimesha (the twinkling of an eye)

3 Nimesha = 1 Ksana (moment)

5 Ksana = 1 Kastha

15 Kastha = 1 Laghu

15 Laghus = 1 Nadika

2 Nadika = 1 Muhurta

6 or 7 Nadika (depending on length or day or night) = 1 Prahara (1/4 of a day or night)

1 Day = 4 Yamas (6 hour period)

15 Days = 1 Fortnight (alternating between bright and dark period)

2 Months = 1 Ritu

6 Months = 1 Ayana (southerly & northern)

2 Ayanas = 1 day/night of demi-gods

 

Arya micro-timescale against modern time scale, is as follows:

1 paramanu = 60750th of a second

1 truti = 29.6296 microseconds

1 tatpara = 2.96296 milliseconds

1 nimesha = 88.889 milliseconds

45 nimesha (1 prana) = 4 seconds

6 prana (1 vinadi) = 24 seconds

60 vinadis (1 nadi) = 24 minutes

60 nadis (1 ahoratra) = 1 day

According to Arya sun time:

100 truti (atom) = 1 tatpara

30 tatpara = 1 nimesha (twinkling)

18 nimesha = 1 kashtha (bit)

30 kashtha = 1 kala (minute)

30 kala = 1 ghatika (1/2 hour)

2 ghatika = 1 muhurta (hour)

30 muhurta = 1 ahoratra (day)

 

Arya astronomical texts are divided time into two categories:

Murttakalah – manifest time or organic time

Amurtakalah – unmanifested time or mechanical time

 

Arya astronomer Varaha Mihira divided a day/night into 24 Horas (Greek ‘Ora’; Latin ‘Hora’; English ‘Hour’). From this is derived the 24 hour system. This was a change from earlier Arya astronomers divisions of day/night into 60 ghatikas.

The moon was used as the basis for the calculation of the fortnight and the month. The solar month entered calculations much later.

 

Samvatsara cycle:

Means a year. 60 samvatsara rotate in cyclical order, divided into three sections of 20 samvatsaras each. The 1st is Brahma, the 2nd is Vishnu, and the 3rd is Shiva.

 

All of this only comes into its own when we begin to rationalise the puzzle of incidents written in the Arya classics of Ramayan (life exploits of Lord Rama) and the Mahabharata (life exploits of Lord Krishna) into our current timescale. Lord Krishna’s time can be placed 70-100 millions years ago. Lord Rama’s period goes further back, aligning with the destruction of the planet which now litters (the asteroid belt) the space between Mars and Jupiter. It was during this time that Earth’s original moon was destroyed, and to stabilize our portion of the solar system an artificial moon was ‘brought’, manoeuvered, and set into motion around Earth. It is this ‘moon’ we see in the sky. It has secrets, slowly unravelling as humanity comes to terms with esoteric phenomena, albeit it has a sub-strata of three-dimensional Beings living there also – a technical civilisation vastly advanced than our own.

During a recent inter-galactic war, Mars had its protective atmospheric zone vaporized. Granted, it was badly depleted by the un-repentant extraction of its mineral and natural resources by humans, as currently happening here on earth. Also worth noting in addition is that Mars had a full set of oceans, lakes, rivers and fresh water; Earth in reality was a second, substitute home, and furthermore, up to that point ‘earthlings’ also resided on one other sphere within this solar system.

This latest inter-galactic war was a very recent event in the scheme of things. It remains fresh in the unconscious psyche of all non race-Europeans. It is this awareness that my seniors are very mindful of. However, a lower order shared with the Europeans the art of gunpowder, and weapons that could be used for destructive means. Later, a similar lower order gave details of projectiles, and their powering mechanisms to the German Max Muller when he visited old India. Thankfully, European mind thus far has only understood the very basic elements of the powering mechanism. This in-depth critical information was used to develop the V2 rocket by the Germans, a weapon of war during the European war (1938-1945), and is the bedrock of current space travel, of which the cruise missile is the latest ‘avatar’.

A short while back, another lower order was advising a European power on the development of a mechanism, with fuel system, and fundamental stablising factors, that would make the atomic weapon a redundant system; and that would allow travel to the nearest star system in about a couple of hours. The higher order, and I as one who had earned access to the debate, spoke out vehemently against sharing any further information with race-Europeans as they would only use it to subjugate other races; and far worse, they would start a fight with other Beings in our solar system and beyond, resulting in a war that would seal the final destruction of Earth. The exchange of information was duly stopped, and an agreement reached between Chen (Zen) and Indian mystics to stop all such exchanges until humanity has sufficiently evolved to a point where each human cares for their fellow human, the planet, and its resources and other dwellers.

Current technology is so utterly backwards that it can be classified as ‘primate weaponry’. Technically bereft, the current thinking (aka European consciousness) is limited to mechanical thinking. Asian thinking by comparison automatically includes the psychic dimension. Aboriginal thinking is pure and sublime, and is the only thought paradigm that has the capacity to fathom creation and its layered dimensional presence. Indian thought paradigm understands the concept of creation based on the organic timescale, but does not hold the key to unravelling its secrets.

The (Indian) organic timescale differs hugely from the European mechanical system. The contradictory mathematics and rules of physics have to be understood at a psychic level, and that is where meditation comes into its own. Meditation, where thought is held in poise, has to become the normal function; and it is only then that complex, hitherto incomprehensible, maths and laws of physics will allow further venture into creation. At the current juncture, humans can only travel a universe as a concept of an analytical thought-sphere, and even then mechanical technology, with Indian assistance and leadership, will limit travel along a single plane trajectory. It is only when humans appreciate the excellence of African, and thereafter Aboriginal, thinking that they will appreciate multi-layered dimensional life form and existence.

Yet, this very reality can also be experienced by merging into permanent meditation, which allows entry into samadhi. It is samadhi that is the opening portal, facilitating factual recognition of the multi-dimensional cosmos.

It is there that humans will engage with demi-gods, and gods…on a permanent basis.

Reverting…

The English copied the German (1938-1945) practice of beginning a day at midnight for purposes of industrial manufacture. Thus began the idiotic ‘day begins at midnight’ nonsense. It has remained in force ever since.

Now that England has exercised Brexit will it, I wonder, drop the German clock time, or retain the German war-time timescale?

Oh, the luxurious stupidity of ignorance…

Interestingly, it was I who re-introduced the phrase ‘ignorance is bliss’, which was then used in the first part of The Matrix film trilogy. This came about because His Holiness in whose tutelage I was placed during my early teens had input into the making of The Matrix. We were watching the much-flaunted modern Bollywood version of the Mahabharata televised on BBC. We looked at each other and felt utter shame at the amateur depiction and rendition of the Indian classic. Interestingly, several of my tongue-in-cheek quotes had already been used regularly in Bollywood by this time. This happened because His Holiness has direct access to directors and actors from Bollywood. Thereafter, his access to Hollywood directors and actors and the making of The Matrix was a foregone conclusion. The Matrix is our rendition of Mahabharata, and its dialogue of how we explain the esoteric in common parlance.

Reverting…

During samadhi, time changes. It is an event-based system, and time has no meaning there per se. As an event-based system, samadhi doesn’t measure the passing of time. Here on Earth, although time sequence is organic, it is circumstantial. This means you can suffer, remain unaffected, or benefit from a situation. By contrast, in samadhi, events take shape and dissolve, but your circumstances remain unaffected. This is because mechanical time becomes dysfunctional and irrelevant. In samadhi, events surpass 360 degrees… a concept humans understand. 360 degrees is a three-dimensional concept, and limits our understanding of how space obscures, or indeed becomes an obstacle, unless one is advanced in samadhi; and only then it is possible to appreciate the limitation of 360 degree conceptual existence.

For example, space as you see and experience it is the very veil that obscures or hides advanced existence. During meditation, and with guidance on how to remain in samadhi, the space-veil disintegrates, or opens up, allowing experience of multi-dimensional existence. The human brain is incapable of fathoming this reality. After all, death experience is not brain-based; that experience is beyond thought-limitations also. Samadhi is not brain or thought based. One has to accept that several bodies co-exist and surround the physical entity. It is one of them that allows consciousness to experience advanced layers of existence.

It is in that advanced state that one meets demi-gods and then gods. Beyond that state lies a platform, an accepted state that is the domain of an Earth personality named Guru Nanakdevji, who re-established Sikhism…for the umpteenth time. It is Guru Nanakdevji who categorically states in his writing in Guru Granthsahibji that Akaal is an environment contained within yet another environment. Human three-dimensional consciousnesses is unable to understand that reality.

Note: I know this only because under tutelage I attained the pedestal of grace. It is that grace which allows me access to and understanding of certain matters. It is a privilege. And I am the first to say that I do not accept that I have the right to experience the higher states by my own volition. That environment is utterly complex, contradictory, and confusing. It is where, unless guided, one falls victim to the advanced ‘divine’ lure of the limited existence (that’s the devil).

And each of you who think that as a Sikh you need no one to teach, guide and show you the passage and its pitfalls, are ignorant and peddling utter nonsense. My dear Sikhs, advanced awakening is not the same as self-teaching masturbation. This is a very serious awakening and can only be accessed through humble service by not expecting anything in return. The person you are in servitude to is a person who is ultimate in experience and has personal accreditation to enter advanced states.

You must remain humble. If the person to whom you are attached is of a lower order do not fret; as your servitude and humbleness are recognised. Eventually, a guide, a mentor, a sublime light-Being will be assigned to you. That person will find you. An automatic, seamless relationship will evolve. However, that person will have to decide if he is willing to make you his ‘ang’. Ang means one’s own. One’s person. One’s self with itself. Where two become one. For reasons I have never fathomed, I attained that privilege. And it is that privilege that I function through, deciphering facts from assumptions.

For example, commentators regale how the gods are human in form and attitude, and their progeny even more so. In my autobiography, now in the process of coming into publication, I explain how and why that is not the case.

I will leave you with this thought. Look into the night sky. You see a lot of space. In advanced samadhi this very sector of our galaxy is empty space. We do not exist. Now conjecture and contemplate as you look at the night sky, and you see space.

Genesis of Khalsa

It is a noble culture, as well as an intellectual utopia to build on the unseen, that intangible consciousness-architecture where showmanship is put aside and one faces the odds with confusion, chaos, complications, and contradictions while attempting to unravel the unfathomable.

Let’s start unraveling…

A cosmic-psyche has a tangible presence. That presence is consciousness. There is a separate consciousness template for each species. Any given consciousness is the lower manifestation of its governing cosmic-psyche. And each cosmic-psyche has a specific role to fulfill in creation.

The consciousness of a particular cosmic-psyche fulfills the requirements of the noble culture mentioned in the opening paragraph. Globally, we call the material manifestation of that consciousness Sikhism.

In this essay, I intend to share knowledge about Sikhism which Sikhs themselves have difficulty grasping and explaining. Events central to Sikhism fly in the face of widespread assumption that it does not give credence to mystical happenings and manifestations called forth by individuals. In fact, as I will go on to show, Sikhism has at times pivoted on mystical incidents expressly engineered by several of the ten Gurus.

One such example, which I have been writing about for almost forty years, centre on the events at Anandpur Sahib in 1699.

Various political and ruling factions have been able to hide evidence relating to this event that was once openly available, including the suppression of eye-witness accounts from the time, which the old-fashioned Sufi could still share if they wished.

The tenth Guruji was tasked with delivering a dutiful and responsible race that would provide global protection, and keep the Light of Balance from going out. So, at the end of March 1699, he invited Sikhs to a meeting at Anandpur Sahib.

What transpired at the meeting was shocking. To this day, Sikhs are unable to explain it, unable to reconcile in their minds what happened with what they think possible in the world. They have therefore conjured up lies and created a mytho-logical account of the event which presents the tenth Guruji as a trickster and a showman, a mere stage performer – all of which traits are antithetical to the very essence of Guruship.

The story goes that Guruji asked for Sikhs to step up who would be willing to give up their heads for the Guruji; that he whisked them away one-by-one out of sight of the congregation, and that he reappeared each time with blood dripping from his kirpan, asking for the next Sikh to pledge himself. The moral of the story is much like that which Kahlil Gibran writes about love, namely, to follow the Guru, lay oneself at his feet, though his ways may be incomprehensible. A similar interpretation is found in the Jewish Torah regarding Abraham’s sacrifice of his son.

Here is what actually happened in March 1699 at Anandpur Sahib….

On a stage and immersed in a deep, practical-samadhi, the tenth Guruji asked for a Sikh who would be willing to give up his head for his Guruji. A Sikh came forward, offering himself humbly. He walked on to the stage, and was directed to kneel down and bow his head execution-style, and with one swift move of Guruji’s sword he was decapitated. His body slumped, his head rolled around, blood spewed everywhere.

Guruji asked for another Sikh to step forward. Another decapitation followed.

In total, five Sikhs were decapitated on the stage at Anandpur Sahib that day.

Afterwards, Guruji moved towards a large metal bowl containing fresh water and recited invocation prayers. During his recitation, Guriji asked his second wife (he had three wives, and two of them bore him his four sons known as the Chaar Sahibzaade) if she had anything she wished to input. Accepting the invitation, Guruji’s wife added dried pure sugar to the water.

The fact of being a Guruji, and the creation-authority conferred upon such beings, combined to transform the sugar-water from simply being an object to having agency. This agency manifested in its authority over Death to stay the execution of the individual until their duty-responsibility has been fulfilled.

Guruji then knelt on the stage, and fused a head with the body lying nearest to it – not the body from which it had been originally parted. He administered the sugar-water – the material object infused now with life-giving agency – to the newly reconfigured body. The dead Sikh gained consciousness and recovered from his ordeal. He was now Pure, born of neither blood nor flesh. He was now Khalsa.

The procedure was repeated five times in total. When all had recovered, they were escorted off stage to wash and change their clothing. The five earlier decapitated, now reconfigured and breathing Sikhs, reappeared on stage in the now famous saffron attire of the Panj Piyare (the five Pure ones), wearing the five Ks of Khalsa.

[Note: please scroll down to the end of this essay for definitions of the five Ks and other terms, such as Guru, Sikh, Singh, Kaur, Khalsa]

Now came the turn of Guruji, Guru Gobind Rai, to kneel before the Panj Piyare and ask if they deemed him worthy to receive the sanctified authority of the sugar-water. They in response asked him what he would be willing to sacrifice. He agreed to four sacrifices; but these were deemed to be insufficient. It was only upon the offer of the fifth sacrifice that Guruji was administered the sugar-water by the Panj Piyare. And only then was he, like the Panj Piyare, accorded the name assigned to those bearing duty-responsibility: Singh. Guru Gobind Rai thus became Guru Gobind Singhji.

Whereupon, the sugar-water was renamed Amrit, its agency in conferring duty-responsibility to those consume it confirmed and thus sanctified. This means that whosoever takes Amrit is embarked upon the journey of becoming and thus fulfilling the role of a global protector. This was not understood by the masses gathered at Anandpur Sahib that day in 1699. Indeed, many thousands of men and women took Amrit that day, but they did so in the belief that it was an elixir and would liberate them. They did not fully comprehend the duty-responsibility which consuming Amrit would imbue them with over time.

The events at Anandpur Sahib that day in late March 1699 spread like wildfire.

The birth of the Khalsa, its foundation in life-revival – which as the facts related above illustrate was not strictly or only the case, though it was a significant part – spread fear in the minds of India’s Moslems.

Sikhs publicly abhor (white/black) witchcraft, and indeed any type of psychic ESP environment and practice. However, Sikhism has at various crucial moments pivoted on the psychic manipulation of matter, bending the rudimentary rules of creation applicable on this planet.

Islam on the other hand is rooted in awe of psychic machination, and values ESP more than divinity. It hones in on and beseeches psychic intervention, deeming it godly, Allah. However, Islam relies on anger mismanagement and ego-laced arrogance, and its adherents justify their actions as scriptural. But it must be remembered that the Koran mimics and mirrors the Torah, which in turn is not scriptural but is a set of guidelines which its own adherents regularly discuss and debate.

In order to counter the absolute value that Islam places on the psychic, over and above divinity, the Gurujis at critical moments employed the very principle of psychic environments to make a point. However, they never used the facility to protect themselves or cheat death, even though they had dominion over death. However, this changed, to a degree, as a consequence of the events that took place at Anandpur Sahib on the new moon in the last week of the month of March, now celebrated on the 13th or 14th of April.

Despite their fear, the Moslems were in awe of the Khalsa. And in war, when they were sure of death, they would seek out a Khalsa, to die at their hands. They did so in recollection of the indication by their Prophet of a coming race which he referred to as angels. These were the Khalsa.

Incidentally, I had the opportunity once of sharing these facts with a Japanese world war two veteran. He told me:

“We feared the Gurkha of course, but it was the Sikhs who evaded death time and again. We could never understand how at the very last moment a Sikh would evade death until, once his duty was accomplished, he could be killed. We put it down to kismet, luck, something like that; but we also viewed and accepted it as a form of zen shogun.”

Hazrat Mohammad, the prophet, the originator of the more fanatical version of the Hebrew faith, now called Islam, stated that a warrior-honest race will evolve to root out evil and protect goodness. He said, they will keep untrimmed beards, and untrimmed hair. Unlike seers, however, they will comb their hair not backwards but by bending forward at the torso and combing from the back of the head towards the forehead. They will be known for their honesty and truthful lifestyle. They will be seers from an arena above divinity, and they will have the consciousness termed duty-responsibility to protect them as and when needed. (Note – death itself is answerable to duty-responsibility, as the events of Anandpur Sahib described above testify to). They will suffer for their responsibility, a responsibility exercised for the greater good of the masses. and holding a grudge will not be in their makeup.

Old Islam resembles the Europe of today. We see Europe on its way to becoming an Islamic caliphate, choosing to wage endless and traumatic war upon the people of the Middle East, while supposedly showing their compassion by allowing the refugees it creates through such war to settle in Europe. Old Islam – or Mohammedism as it was then known – carried out a similar unceasing war on Aryadesh (now called India). The brutality re-invoked and re-established a protector race that in previous times had occupied the landmass of Europe (all but forgotten now except for the language influences it left behind). That protector race with its ideology of graciousness has, in current times, as in the olden times of its existence, come to be called Sikh.

Guys, the Sikh as a people have not yet delivered on their duty and responsibility. In times to come, when humanity faces certain extinction, the Sikhs will stand alongside others to defend against this but it will be the Sikhs’ contribution that will be the linchpin, that will allow humanity to survive.

People from three other races also hold this cardinal knowledge. Those races live in lands conquered and occupied by Europeans. For the safety of humanity, governance of those lands must revert back to the indigenous races. After that happens, it will take seven to ten generations for their psyche to realign with their past identity and knowledge, and they will be ready to share the Sikhs’ global responsibility and avert this planet from being wiped out. Only a release from the bondage of the present will provide the essential elements for the Sikhs, and then the Khalsa, to manifest a mechanism for our survival.

You cannot all become Sikh, let alone become Khalsa.

Meditation leads to samadhi.

Samadhi leads to practical-samadhi.

But none of this progression is possible without grace.

And grace? Well, it has to be earned.

To earn grace, you have to throw yourself upon the mercy of a Sadhu. You relinquish your life to a Sadhu at each birth. They may be vile, arrogant, whatever; but you must not judge them. An unseen authority will notice your sacrifice; and will send a divine mentor to teach, guide, and honour you with grace. The obstacles are unbelievable. You are set to fail. But it is not the passing or the failing that counts. The telling point is humbleness. Truth will only take you so far. It will not set you free. Humbleness will set you free.

The journey begins with humbleness.

Avtar

…………………….

Here are deeper definitions of Guru, Sikh, Khalsa, and the meaning of the five Ks.

GURU:

First, it ought to be clear from the fore-going depiction of events at Anandpur Sahib in 1699, and of Guruji’s actions there, that a Guru is not a teacher or an enlightener. It is an insult to Sikhs and to India more generally to apply such secularist descriptions to any guru, though these people and many others besides are daft enough to use the title – in its ridiculously false definition – and hope that the person thus conferred the name of guru will deliver them from the cycle of life and death… but as you may have guessed, there’s no chance of that actually happening.

What is more, secular people who refer to each other as guru inadvertently establish an ongoing bond with them whereby the one on the pedestal is obliged to drag the other into the unfathomable. Sounds good, right? But what it really means is that both are tied into to a contract where whenever one of them fails and falls down the selection-progression ladder – from human to animal or insect – the other will accompany them down there.

Call another a guru or jockey yourself into a position to be called a guru, and both of you will seriously inhibit your progress towards being free from the bondage of life and death …so, do not call another person a guru, and do not allow yourself be tagged guru either, is my advice here.

Having clarified what a Guru is not, let’s clarify what it is. Guru is an entity by whose intervention they who are at the apex of divinity attain moksha, albeit the lower level thereof. Guru at this junction is unseen, a sense-teaching entity, beyond the sound-light conundrum. One cannot meditate into moksha, as one can with divinity; one accesses and advances into moksha by invitation, or more usually by recommendation (what we otherwise call grace), hence the need for an intervening entity – the Guruji.

SIK-KH:

Sikkh is the actual and correct spelling for a Sikh when written in English. However, I will use the spelling Sikh for ease of comprehension.

Sikh is an analyser, scrutiniser and improver of every aspect of life, from the secular to the divine…yet they remain humble throughout.

Sikh, despite all the things you may have heard it described as, also refers to a realm above that of the divine. One of the tests of divinity is to be born and live one’s life in a secular household environment. The divine undergoing secular tests are currently born into Sikh households. Sure, divinity can be attained by the recluse – often thought of as the ultimate detached individual – but the more difficult test to be mastered is that of maintaining one’s stature and status while navigating the quotidian and mundane everyday tasks of the householder. Those of my position have seen many a person’s hard-won divinity unravel in such trying circumstances. It is not easy.

SINGH/KAUR:

Singhs and Kaurs are those who have chosen to practice a Sikh lifestyle in conjunction with the secular environment, and who do so without flinching from the challenges the secular may impose on their Sikh way of life. It is the ultimate test of detachment. Singh denotes male-energy; Kaur denotes female-energy (energy – shakti). Shakti itself has many layered definitions. As of course do Singh and Kaur.

KHALSA:

What about Khalsa? Well, it is not a name or label given to baptised Sikhs, as is universally thought. You cannot baptise the baptised. Rather, the consumption of Amrit, symbolic authority made material, confers upon the Sikh a duty-responsibility – which manifests in their new identification as Khalsa – which might more appropriately be thought of less as baptism than investiture. Baptism, insofar as it relates to Sikhism, refers for its part to the attunement of a being with Sikhism which then readies them for birth as a Sikh. Though it ought to be remembered (and this contradicts the previous statement to some degree), that being born into a Sikh family does not automatically indicate one’s attainment of Sikhism; though for the most part, being part of a practising Sikh household is a step in one’s progress towards awakening.

The Five Ks of Sikhism

Note: each of the following has multi-layered, more expansive, and deeper connotations and significances than those offered below. But the following will give you a basic initial insight into the five Ks of Sikhism.

KESH:

Tangled hair symbolises the emotional tangles of the mind that hinder one’s divine progress. The hair is detangled by the act of bending one’s head forward and combing the hair from that position, and thus symbolises the reminder to detangle the mind and it emotions. The movement of bending forward also lowers one’s head, and thus constitutes an act of humbleness too. Only detached humbleness untangles emotional entrapments.

KANGA:

The comb the Sikh wears in their hair. The teeth of the kanga signify, and remind one to use the mind’s thoughts to excavate for deeper and refined awareness from within one’s own antrkarna (soul) using the Atma. The Atma, as I have stated elsewhere and numerous times, is not the equivalent of the soul. The soul is the harmonised cooperation of the body’s internal organs to clear obstacles and allow for ever-increasing awareness, taking one from the lower disciplines of religion, rite-ritual, spirituality, and dharma into divinity and onwards into Sikhism.

KARRA:

The steel bangle, as it is universally referred to, the karra signifies deflecting the emotionality that hinders divine clarification. Once again, one uses humbleness to format a path from one to the other.

KIRPAAN:

The kirpaan has dual symbolism: forgiveness at the point of killing one’s foe, and the cutting edge of refined thought that is the basis from which one progresses into divine awareness.

KACHHA:

This signifies the refined, discriminating, and tranquil expression of all sexual emotions, that lead into higher realms of divinity.

Holi (festival of colour)

On the full moon of the last month of the Indian year (Phalgun – Feb/Mar), a special festival is celebrated.

I first experienced Holi in Panjab, after we had left Kenya during the Mau Mau uprising, and it was eye-opening.

I already knew the three main stories associated with the event. Inter-connected, they stemmed from the Arya tradition, morphed into Vedic tradition, aspects of which were then debunked in Sikh tradition, until they came to be made synonymous with Hindu tradition. The version of the story which one celebrates at Holi is usually chosen after a quick period of introspection as to which story resonates the most.

Story #1

An arrogant and obnoxious king of Multan, Panjab, considered himself the perfect human being – a god whom his subjects ought to worship. This king’s son, Hiranyakashipu (Hira, for short – which in its diminutive means ‘gem’), however, worshipped not his father but Lord Vishnu. When debate, dictates and threats proved useless in swaying the child to do his father’s bidding, the king employed a nursemaid to smear her breasts with poison before suckling the child. The nursemaid died from poisoning; Hira lived. Exasperated, the king then ordered his son to sit in his aunt’s lap – she who, following a prolonged period of penance had been granted the ability to withstand fire – and she would then sit on a pyre with the child in her lap. The son acceded to his father’s demand – his aunt was burned alive; Hira emerged unscathed.

Seldom making its way into this version of the Holi story is that Hira, Lord Vishnu’s worshipper, covered himself in an array of earth elements of various colours, and thus protected himself from the fire. The inclusion of such a critical aspect of the story would have been deeply problematic to a an Arya culture grown increasingly impotent in terms of its capacity for analytical understanding and instead pinning all its hopes on divine intervention. If Hira saved himself, whither the miracle of God’s intervention and grace!

Sikhs have taken up the baton of analytical understanding and insight discarded and lost by the Arya. Indeed, according to their dharma (i.e., Sikhism) there is no divine intervention. Psyche and divinity are logical aspects of creation, albeit at a rarified super-conscious level; though of course, they must get their hands dirty, so to speak.

Accordingly, Holi is celebrated as the victory of good over evil in the form of Hira smearing himself with the colours of the earth. No divine intervention in sight!

Story #2

As a child, Krishna’s skin pigment was deep purple. In fact, he was so deeply and darkly purple as to resemble people from Africa. You can conclude, therefore, what his origins were; I have an open mind about such things, but Hindu India is certainly not ready for such facts. Anyway, Krishna was besotted with Radha. She was fair. He was dark, very very dark, purplish-black indeed, on top of which he had all the usual boyish complexes. Following his mother’s advice, Krishna the child smeared Radha – who up until then had dismissed his approaches – with earth colours. Their differences thus muted, the children played together happily and went on to become the great lovers of Vedic Indian lore.

Story #3

Lord Shiva, a very boring guy should you happen to meet him since he is always meditating, is portrayed as moody, unapproachable and intolerant of mischief and petty conversation. You can decide for yourselves whether that makes him a social outcast or a god, though for my part I respect this configuration of his personality. Anyway, one day an upwardly mobile, divinely-steeped person decided to test Lord Shiva’s meditative focus. Assuming the form of an irresistible damsel, the changeling began dancing in front of Lord Shiva. Where others would have been fooled, Lord Shiva was not. The changeling was burned to ash with one look from Lord Shiva’s third eye, who then gave him back life. Thus, during Holi, ash is smeared on the forehead by the devout to represent the death and the revival of the changeling. Over time, earth colours were introduced too – suggesting some symbiosis of the various Holi stories.

Sikh analysis

Now let’s imbue proceedings with some Sikh analytical thought and insight. For this, I need to revisit my childhood.

As I said earlier, my first Holi celebration took place in Panjab after we had moved there from Kenya. In the days leading up to the event, all the local kids raced around borrowing each other’s possessions as if it were their right to do so (we would now call this thieving). We gathered together things we had thus ‘borrowed’, including from our own mothers’ kitchens, after school and raced to the local playground – basically, a large area of dry and barren earth, around which housing was erected, and which we used for playing gulli-danda, kick-about and, above all, cricket.

Escaping the clutches of mothers and sisters, as we ran we held close our booty of turmeric, neem, dhak, kumkum, powdered red sandalwood, dried flowers, radishes, pomegranates, mehndi, gram flour, vibrant and deep coloured fruits and vegetables such as berries, grapes and beetroot, dried tea leaves and charcoal… and of course most important of all, water.

No single household had all these items, so we each gathered what we could find, and brought them to the playground where the older boys organised for us to take turns grinding everything into a paste using a pestle and mortar – basically a larger flat stone and a smaller more rounded stone. We would then leave the paste out to dry in the sun.

Each group of lads would end up with a fair amount of dry powder at the end of this activity. Three days before the last full moon of the year, younger kids like me were assigned to collect firewood from around the local area. As darkness fell and the full moon appeared on the horizon, we lit a fire to commemorate the symbolic burning of the young boy Hira.

The next day, the fun began. We dispersed our dry powder in large metal buckets filled three quarters of the way up with water. We filled our bicycle pumps, appropriately sealed to prevent leakage, with the colourful solution… and then it was a case of let them have it! No one was spared, as we sprayed all around us with colour, and everyone was a happy smiling target – old and young. Those of us who didn’t have bicycles yet, filled up glass Coca-Cola and Fanta bottles and shook them around. It was playful war.

Misunderstanding the rules, I would often forget the playful aspect in favour of the war aspect, thinking it was my mission to remain as dry as possible while soaking as many other people with colour as possible. One lad too umbrage at this misunderstanding of mine and came after me, glass bottle against glass bottle. The inevitable happened, the necks of the glass bottles broke, and I was slashed deep at the wrist just above the bone, while he was similarly if also less deeply cut. A gaping bloody wound opened up just centimetres from a huge vein that snakes its way around the wrist bone, and was duly wrapped in cloth. Instinctively, I submerged my hand and wrist into one of the buckets of colourful water, and then an elder yanked it out of the water and smeared it with some of the powder we had ground days earlier. I got an earful that day, and I still bear the scar to this day – but damn it was fun!

Looking back at the event now, I can apply some rational thinking to what went on.

The season is turning; bio-systems are undergoing a physical cleanse to release them from the rigours of winter; and the cold virus abounds. Cures and cleanses are sought in homeopathic medicines whose ingredients are earthbound. The beginning of springtime is thus the moment in which we boost our immune systems.

All of this activity is of course stepped in rite and ritual – but its effects are tangible and embodied.

In communities that celebrate Holi using traditional earth ingredients, none of the eye, skin, or inflation problems suffered by city dwellers are experienced; and rates of influenza are lower, as is their severity. In urban areas, by contrast, the use of industrial synthetic colours entails eye irritations requiring hospital intervention, severe skin problems requiring manufactured medicine, and seriously debilitating bouts of flu.

If I were you, I’d make my way to India – off the beaten track there are places where Holi celebrations last a month. Tell them Avtar sent you!

As for the story of Holi that resonates with me? Well, I prefer to conceptualise the event as a turning point away from old grudges, feuds and animosities; and towards the renewal of friendships and reinforcement of existing ties.

The new organic year has kicked off and has brought with it spring and new life.

Happy Holi!

Now, go bury the hatchet…

Spring festivals, Sacrifice, Cannibalism & Sikhism’s New Year

Part I

End of one organic cycle: beginning of another.

This year’s vernal equinox falls on 20th March in the northern hemisphere. Amongst some cultures, this passage of time is celebrated according to tenets opposed to modernism and to modern perspectives. Isolationism couples itself with celebration of glories past. Subjective theorizing, loose philosophy, and a particular cultural moral compass on sexuality, combine to give us brain-drained commonsense, which clings to the cleverness of days long gone, unremarkable now but for the romanticised folkloric memories passed down the generations.

Spring:

Pagans celebrate Ostara, performing rites and rituals in honour of fertility and regeneration, symbolised by the goddess Eostre (a Germanic word meaning east), who represents young women, fresh light, and the budding of trees and flowers.

Fertility and regeneration are celebrated by the gifting of brightly painted eggs, themselves embodiments of fertility and renewal, as are hares (which have symbolic connection to the moon).

Easter:

Historians and liberal theologians believe death and resurrection was initially, in Caucasian consciousness, associated with Attis – a Phrygian (an area now in Turkey) and god of vegetation. In his self-mutilation, death, and resurrection Attis represents the fruits of the earth, which die in winter and rise again in spring. His cult began around 1250BC. The incidents attributed to him were grafted onto stories of Jesus’ life to make Christian theology more acceptable regionally. Elsewhere, other theologians indicate that Jesus’ life events as they appear in the gospels are lifted straight from the life of Krishna.

Easter celebrates Jesus’ resurrection. It occurs at the end of Lenten (‘lengthening of days’), which lasts 46 days from Ash Wednesday (falling on 10th February this year) until Easter Sunday (27th March this year). Tradition counts this as 40 days, and excludes for various reasons Saturdays and Sundays.

The Thursday before Easter is Holy Thursday and commemorates Jesus’ Last Supper. The Friday before Easter is Good Friday, and it commemorates the anniversary of Jesus’ crucifixion. The Saturday before Easter is Holy Saturday, a remembrance of Jesus’ entombment.

The Easter period represents two opposing worlds co-existing – darkness, sin and death on the one hand and resurrection, restoration of light, and spring on the other. The evening vigil between Good Friday and Easter day symbolizes the end of the first and the beginning of the second.

Currently, Easter Sunday* is one of the Christian calendar’s two holiest days. This is the result of public pressure forcing the western church to institutionalize the observance of Easter, despite early Christians not having observed it at all.

*(Sunday is named after the Scandinavian sun goddess Sunna. Sunna, interestingly, is a Sanskrit word used by Buddhaji as well as by Vedic and eastern philosophy. It refers to a state above stillness, quietness and nothingness.)

Around 325AD, Emperor Constantine ordered Easter to be celebrated on the first full moon of Spring, which occurs between 21st March and 25th April. It is noteworthy that the current biblical story of Jesus’ crucifixion took formal root in the western church as a result of Emperor Constantine’s collusion.

The eastern church, by contrast, echoes Jesus’ own observance of the earlier tradition of Passover. It ought to be noted that at no time did Jesus renounce his Jewish religion. Nor did he insist on a new religion. He simply reintroduced clarity, and de-cluttered confusion. This year, Passover begins on Friday 22nd April and ends on Saturday 30th April.

Part II

Cannibalism

Numerous stories in Greek mythology involve cannibalism, but only between close family members. It was practiced to maintain purity and specialness and mirrored the Egyptian Pharaohic practice of incest, which aimed to retain the purity to the royal lineage bestowed by the gods.

Not too dissimilar to the Islamic practice of marrying within the family pool, cannibalism and Egyptian royal incest associated purity with, and emerged from, as well as being bounded, by kinship.

Privilege, prestige and oneness were the core precepts of cannibal practice originally, before it became widespread globally.

In Gough’s Cave, England, there is evidence of communal cannibalism practiced around 15000 years ago. In fact, evidence exists that cannibalism was actually still practiced around 2000 years ago in Great Britain, and across Europe during various periods, until recent times.

In World War II, there was reported cannibalism at the siege of Leningrad, among Soviet POWs dying in Nazi camps due to extreme starvation, and also among German troops when they were besieged in Stalingrad as well as when they were later transferred to prison camps in Siberia.

In India, the Aghoris (Indian ascetics), consume human flesh that’s been cooked on the funeral pyre, after the family of the deceased has left. They believe the flesh provides spiritual benefits, and they claim that it tastes like chicken.

In the USA, in 1931, New York reporter William Buehler Seabrook secured a chunk of human meat from the body of a healthy person killed in an accident, from a hospital intern, and he cooked and ate it. He reported, “It was like good, fully developed veal, not young, but not yet beef. It was so nearly good, fully developed veal, that I think no person with a palate of ordinary, normal sensitiveness could distinguish it from veal, and cannot be mistaken for goat, high game, or pork.”

In his book The Gulag Archipelago, Alexandra Solzhenitsyn describes cannibalism in 20th century USSR, where children, dead by famine, were eaten by their parents.

When the Uruguayan Air Force Flight 571 crashed in the Andes on 13th October 1972, the survivors resorted to eating the deceased during their 72 days in the mountains.

In England, on 23rd July 1988, Rick Gibson ate human flesh in public, in Walthamstow, London. The country does not have a specific law against cannibalism. He did so again on 15th April 1989, in Lewisham High Street, London. When Gibson attempted to eat human meat in Vancouver on 14th July 1989 the Canadian police confiscated his meal. However charges were dropped, and he went on to eat another piece of human flesh on the steps of the Vancouver court house on 22nd September 1989.

Part III

Cannibalism, Spring Festivals and Sikh New Year

Paganism has an unbelievable amount of words, rites and rituals that overlap with Vedic Brahmanism, as indeed do many of the Voodoo rites and rituals practiced globally. Brahmanism, briefly, denotes living in harmony with nature and venerating the organic template. It believes the egg has a special symbolic meaning, hence an old Pagan ritual of ‘sacrificing’ an egg by placing it under the foundations of new buildings for protection, well-being, and progression.

Nowadays, during Pagan and Christian spring festivals eggs are coloured brightly, the brightness communicating renewal, freshness, fertility, and the propagation of spices (which also represent fertility).

The Latin proverb “Omne vivum ex ovo”, meaning “All life comes from an egg” coincides perfectly with pure knowledge, the Vadantic scriptures, and the most modern de-mystified writing that exists today referred to and addressed as Sikhism’s living Guru. These all acknowledge that the whole universe was created from an egg. Creation, in Sikhism, is in fact repeatedly called an egg.

The egg thus continues to circulate today as a meaningful emblem of life and as an allegory for rebirth.

Sacrifice, nowadays, takes the form of a nominal food offering, a monetary donation to a religious or dharmic organisation, or to a charity, or else seva (selfless service for the benefit of another).

The sacrificial practice continues to be led by the elder male of a family group. The sanctity of the occasion is duly observed with reverent introspection, and a silent expression of gratitude that one is capable of offering the gift or service in the first place. It is interesting how without any external prompt humbleness automatically surfaces during the sacrifice.

We now live in a cycle of negative Shiva, as opposed to a cycle of positive Shiva. This represents transmutation, negative technology, self-interest presiding over charity, and the search for self-realisation. Thus, the charity of this cycle is the sacrifice of money, and/or giving away articles and items of wealth.

Charity was also practiced during the negative cycle of Brahma. That period witnessed the beginning of the hallowed activity of sacred sacrifice of a living Being. Initially, the living Being was ordinary grain. Then it was fruit and eggs. Later, the sacrifice was elevated to one’s personal possessions, a sacrifice of personal wealth; hence the beginning of animal sacrifice. It began with small domesticated farm animals including the hare, until people’s grandiose egos pushed them to sacrifice ever larger animals. Then the (now) unacceptable happened. For numerous emotional and/or seasonal reasons, the sacrifice became human, moving from infants to adult females and adult males. However, the most potent sacrifice was deemed to be the sacrifice of young females.

Sacrifice, right from the beginning, involved conscious acknowledgement that the gift became sanctified through the act of sacrifice, that it was blessed and imbued with grace. Once sanctified, the offering was shared among attendees, so that they might be blessed by consuming the sanctified object – first grains, then eggs, then animals, and eventually humans. But human flesh consumption was limited in the Brahma period to the royals and the high priests.

This practice changed, as the governing thought-energy changed. Four of the five thought-energy states are:

  1. Maiea
  2. Brahma
  3. Vishnu
  4. Shiva

These each have three expressions of which two are applicable to ordinarywallas (being the positive and negative cycles). It has to be remembered that all four states are interwoven and interlinked. They exist in both their positive and negative templates as an everyday occurrence, and they flip between various expressions moment to moment.

Ordinarywallas are familiar with the trinity state concept of Hinduism, namely, Brahma – the coagulator, Vishnu – the stabilizer, and Shiva – the transmutator. Enveloping and preceding them is state one, the Maiea symmetry.

State one: Sacrifice of the inner self. Doubt is sacrificed, and clarity sought in the process.

State two: Grain and seasonal food become the sacrificial norm. Ego gains importance.

State three: Animal offering, followed by human offering, becomes the status quo.

State four: A proxy sacrifice is established in place of personal sacrifice, such that material objects become the sacrificial lamb.

Whichever way we look at it, the practice of making an offering during the period of regeneration, i.e. Spring, is driven by the norms of one’s customs.

To begin with, nature make a sacrifice of crops, and humans harvest and consume that sacrifice (death) once the crop or fruit is ripe. Thus, the concept of consuming death is itself nature-driven. We as humans eat death. Many, like myself, who are life-long lacto-vegetarian, pompously register our distain for eating death in the form of flesh. Yet we consume the dead. The dead in our instance are dead vegetables.

Pomposity in us compels us to declare we are superior to flesh-eaters. But are we, outside of our own high-falutin’ sense of authority, really superior at all to, and more internally advanced than, those we think of as emotionally-retarded, spiritually bereft, dead-flesh eating savages? No, we are exactly the same.

What is a vegetarian (Indian)? Let’s clear up the gobbledegook western terminology:

Selective Vegetarian (SV)       white meat eater, will consume eggs and fish

Vegetarian (V)                           will not consume eggs or fish – however, is not a vegan

Restricted Vegetarian (RV)     will not consume root or commercial vegetables

Vegan                                           will not consume dairy, eats commercial vegetables

Inaccurately, in the west, those who do eat eggs, fish and commercial vegetables, but not dairy, call themselves vegan. To date, however, I have yet to meet one who fulfills the criteria of the ultra strict vegetarian diet of Jainism.

Side Note: Dairy, natural yogurt and ghee are quintessential staples of the diet of Jain ascetics The above sentence is part of an old argument people would try to hammer me on regarding fats and cholesterol, when I maintained that fats and cholesterol are a quintessential components needed for a flexible healthy body, while manufactured foods are the evil that we need to reject totally. Thus, honey is fine as well as all nuts, but white sugar and processed food will prove to be the foundations of virulent disease, as opposed to dysfunctional bio-sphere disease. God, I was even hammered mercilessly when I maintained that healthy four-times-a-week sex was vital to retain youthfulness.

Smug?

Well yes, it is nice to be proven right, however if one is treading the inner awakening path, tutored by a descending Being, then sexual activity goes out of the window totally lest it be under strict conditions, in tandem with strict adherence to diet, coupled with several other observations that are mandatory…and the chances of meeting, and then being taken under the wing of a descending Being are between remote to never.

Leaving aside the pompous grandstanding of the vegetarians or those who follow the Jain diet, I put forward the concept that animals who eat a living Being, be that a leaf still attached to it stalk and branch, or an animal consumed alive, are better dieticians and far more honest Beings than the hypocrite vegetarian looking down on the meat-eating human.

And to the meat-eaters I ask: Simply because the animal you eat is not configured as a human does this make you any less a cannibal?

The majority of animals consumed share more than 50% DNA with humans. So how is it that eating an animal, which shares any percentage of DNA with a human, is not cannibalism?

Serious points to ponder.

An interesting side note: Fertilizer, earth and water, and the transformation of the three energy systems via a seedling into an edible vegetable is Shiva configuration in action. This is a very good example of transmutation. In simple terms, death of one entity giving life to a more progressive life form.

Reverting…

The concept of a sacrifice, in honour of nature’s regeneration in the northern hemisphere, is built into the human psyche. The Sikhs, annually, make the same sacrifice.

This year, Sikhs will celebrate their New Year on 13th March 2016. This date is lunar-based and changes annually.

Globally, the sacrifice the Sikhs will make on this date is several hours of repetitive prayer that invokes dissolution of

  • disease
  • mental problems
  • emotional ill-will

…and that seeks to replace it with peaceful resolution amongst all living beings, be they human or non-human.

But at the same time, Sikhs love a party, and the arrival of Spring will be no exception.

This year, from 25th – 27th March, the spiritual activity of defensive war games, hand-to-hand armed combat and other such disciplines will be practiced and celebrated in Panjab, and by Sikhs globally. The food offered and consumed will be lacto-vegetarian, and not a single desire for commercial partying will be exercised.

Please, join me as I invite you to share a miniscule moment of your time by either visiting a place of worship to say a prayer, or expressing a thought for global peace amongst all humans.

Alternatively, light a jôt or candle*, but like me do it on the quiet, and buy someone less fortunate than yourself a meal.

*(Candle and Jôt: Represents light. The wick is humanity’s ego, the beeswax or ghee is sinless purity. The flame is the divine nature. Five types of incense are used, representing five positive classifications of awakening. The five negative classifications are Kama-Lust, Krodh-anger-rage-wrath, Lobha-greed, Moha-attachment-delusion, Ahankar-ego-arrogance-nescience; or as I prefer, the five positives are non-violence, truth, non-stealing, controlled-chastity, non-attachment.)

My prayers are with you all, and I request that you accept my wish for your health and emotional well-being…and smile. No matter what, just smile.

The Crucifixion Tie

From a young age I had a natural flair for perception that entailed an intimate understanding of phenomena beyond self-consciousness. Artistic simplifications, such as marrying multiple and totally unrelated colours, made complete sense to me though others found it confusing. Even now, when I paint, if my paintbrush touches a colour I never baulk at using it regardless of its relationship to adjacent colours. Eventually the colour palette looks satisfactory; and albeit that it may seem strange, it appeals.

Similarly, quantum consciousness is an omnivorously transcendent yet simplistic entity. However, to the ordinarywallahs it is like a swaggering revolution, laced with panoramic blandness.

In the England of my childhood – a hard, unforgiving, intolerant, rude, obnoxious society – I chose to wear unshorn hair proudly. Then, upon entering the secondary school system, aged eleven or so, I chose to wear a full adult turban. The turban made me stand out, ofcourse. However, no one ever made a demeaning or derogatory remark that I ever heard regarding my turban, in school or outside of it.

At a personal level, growing up, I greeted some people with humour, and kept others at a distance, since by now my ESP gave me insight into their nasty minds, and so I kept them at arm’s length. Humour and mischief were my natural traits. The combination would get me into trouble, and just as often get me out of many a tight situation.

When I took the first steps in a career that I chose rather than the one chosen for me, I found it irritating to have to wear a suit, boot and tie. The regimented dress felt like being back at school. But what my chosen career environment allowed me to do was to use my intuitive ability against the tax regime, and to suggest appropriate legal vehicles for lowering or mitigating death duty, now called inheritance tax. I was good. I read endlessly, especially the older tax regulations, and I always found an overlooked or forgotten law or rule to resuscitate that would help lower tax liabilities. The joy was not the income I derived from such work, but the intellectual sharpness I engaged to manoeuvre the tax regime in my favour. In fact, I found the taxman (they were all men at that time) very friendly and accommodating, and not in the least overbearing or threatening. They were there to complete a remit given by the government of the day. And they did that very well. I was there to see a way around the government’s latest methods to raid more of one’s income, saving or inheritance.

An accountant’s job is to tell you how much tax you have to pay. A tax planner’s duty is to locate a legal framework to lower the same. They are two very different disciplines. The most telling aspect of my personality was my strict adherence to the fact that tax had to be paid, and that foul means would not be entertained in order to circumvent this. Coupled with this was my ability to see an investment opportunity in the financial or property market. I worked mostly on a limited part-time basis, and only to assist the select few, and increasingly I refused to accept any monetary payment in return. My job satisfaction was derived from being able to find a method to lower tax liability which others from the same discipline were unable to find or hadn’t even considered. Money never motivated me. A sense of accomplishment enthused and sustained me then, as it does to this day.

One day, when I was visiting a colleague to advise his team of financial advisors, his boss invited me for a chat in his office. He offered me a job with a very handsome remuneration package. I asked if he was a practicing Christian and also a stickler for office discipline. His answer to both was affirmative. In response, I suggested that he appoint somebody else since I would have to decline his generous offer. He was dumbfounded and sought an explanation. As a Sikh, I told him, I refuse to wear the insignia confirming my adherence to Christianity and which underscores Jesus Christ of Nazareth as my god-conduit. The man was taken aback, but he composed himself and offered to exempt me from having to wear a tie. I thanked him, before pointing out that office discipline was vital for productivity, and that others would follow my lead and request various laxities and relaxations around the office, which would in turn affect the functioning of the office.

About twenty-five years after this incident, and while I was at a Gujarati curry-café (what the hell is a curry house?) someone called out my name; the face looked familiar. We greeted each other warmly and the man insisted that I meet his family, who were dining at the same place. Gathering his large extended family together, he pointed to me and said, “You know I am always telling you about a very proud Sardarji [Sardarji is the title for a turban-wearing Sikh], with very strong principles, who would not sell out his faith for any amount of money? Well, this is that gentleman.” Duly impressed, the family returned to their seats, and I turned to ask what on earth was he on about. The man reminded me about the job offer that had been made me all those years ago, recounted to me my reasons for turning it down, and relayed to me how impressed the company’s entire staff – of whom he was one – had been with my integrity for not selling out my strong beliefs in return for a very handsome financial package. “As a matter of interest, how much does that position pay now?” I enquired. “With someone of your ability, well over a six figure sum plus bonuses”. “Wow”, I thought to myself, “I turned it down, I must have been mad.” Yet, the reality is that even today I would refuse to accept that offer if it meant I had to wear a tie.

All my shirts are collarless. And I have always worn an amended version of the traditional Indian jacket/coat over the shirt. And, yes, I look very handsome in that outfit.

Since my early adulthood, I have been sharing why non-Christians need not wear a tie, as it signifies being a Christian. The tie stands for both the cross, and the crucifixion of Jesus Christ of Nazareth. However, the fear of not getting a job, or even of losing one, exerts enormous blackmail-style pressure on individuals to wear a tie. It is a very sad and indeed narrow mindset that makes the European world insist that everyone dress like them, or else you will not get a job, or land the much-needed business deal. What do the Europeans fear?

Is the race-European any less moronic than the Islamist who insists women wear the face veil and be covered from head to toe?

It seems you can paint your house any colour, as long as it is bland.

Someone is suffering from a lack of self-esteem, and in doing so they are the mirror image of the “fanatical Islamist”.

To the Sikhs who appear on England-based television stations I appeal: please have the dignity to not wear the Christian tie under your long beards. You are not Christians, nor are you emotional cowards. Your confused dress gives out an equally confusing subliminal message to the viewers. It says: be a Sikh, but put a higher value on yourself by dressing like a Christian.

How sad.

I do not want Christians, Jews or Muslims to dress like me, a Sikh.

You call only your mother “mother”, and I call only my mother, “mother”. Why do you insist that I have to call your mother and not my own, “mother”?

Please, grow up, and enjoy cultural diversity.

We in England are very lucky to have a fantastic and fascinating global community, culture, diet, and integration. Yes, we are integrated. And no, we do not want or need to mimic the European cultural-ethnic style to indicate integration, for that is insulting to both the host migrants and the new migrants. We need to value diversity, and not crucify it into blandness like the indigenous migrants demand.

And always remember that the people now called Indians were the ones who vacated the land that came subsequently to be occupied by Caucasians, and that now is called Europe.

Humans have always been and will always remain migrants.

Another truth humans cannot escape is that we are guardian-tenants of a land, we are never its owners.

Something to reflect on.

On revising scripts and calendars: An open letter to Maharani Preneet Kaur of Patiala

Improvements, revisions, and modifications are deemed a necessity lest an academic is pigeon-holed as a non-entity. Applause of a newer schism is acceptable, but to be ignored or deemed unremarkable is the ego-death nail to an academic.

The above paragraph is borrowed from my essay ‘Changes to Alphabet’. In that essay I discuss how English letters evolved, being in some cases joined together, eventually either to be dropped or replaced. The essay took shape after a Sikh academic from North America descended on this little island and delivered a polished, well-rehearsed gobbledygook word-speak. A mooncalf let loose simply because he could deliver a polished talk. As for the content – I was left waiting for content, but it never arrived. What I heard instead was nonsense packaged with the panache of a campus novelette.

The problem with revisionists and academics is that in their desire to ‘be someone’ they attain Idiocy. Many who read my work are aware of the definition that we, from our background, use to identify ‘stupid’ – an individual who has read five books on a given subject and thinks that makes for expertise. An idiot takes that belief to a whole new level and begins expounding the ‘idealism’ therein.

Sikhs make for a great anthropological study. A recent history. An evolving culture. An old cultural heritage whose source is lost in antiquity. Sikhs are consciously and constantly redefining themselves. However, their psyche repeatedly pulls them towards their inner source – into events and time that current conscious memory has forgotten …my kind of a big deal, really.

Yes, I am privileged to be born a Sikh (each birth in a given faith and culture has a reason – the subject for different essay), and I love studying Sikhs. Doing so is primarily for my own benefit in that I explore, examine, explain, and understand myself; and this then allows me to better understand how established cultures, languages, and scripts evolved.

Take the example of the Sikh calendar.

Sikhs have been in haste to separate themselves from ‘Hinduism’, which to this moment they consider a curse on their identity. Yet, as I have openly and vociferously explained, Sikhism precedes Hinduism by 150 years or so. In such an environment limited knowledge can be a dangerous thing. The so-called educated elite, those who scraped through to the Ivy League institutions in the United States, were unable to explain why the birth of Guru Gobind Singhji, the tenth Sikh Guru, sometimes has two birthdays in a calendar year, sometimes one, and sometimes none. They decided the fault lay with the Hindu calendar and Hindu mischief, and they wallowed in their complete ignorance of the facts behind such things.

This educated elite were/are so dumb that they could not explain that the phenomenon of Guruji’s birthday happening once, twice or not at all in a year was due to the fact that the Gregorian calendar starts almost two-thirds of the way into the Vedic (Sikh) calendar. Thus in the Sikh calendar, Guruji’s birthday indeed happens only once a year. Nor could they explain that all Sikh, Vedic, Hindu and Buddhist dates are aligned with and in keeping with the organic function of planet Earth, and are based on the cycle of the moon. In this cycle, dates change annually: the organic conveying a procession that is neither mechanical nor machine-precise. Being organic, it requires grey matter to comprehend its function, the very grey matter that is fast becoming extinct due to the lazy reliance on, and utilization of, computers.

Hell, even I have become a victim of computers, for I have forgotten how to spell basic words, relying totally on spell-check. On top of that, I am fast losing my in-built sense of direction, which I have always used to sense the position of the sun or where the cardinal points of the earth lie. I have become utterly dependent on GPS systems to get around.

To revert, the USA-educated elite who graduated in one type of ‘ology’ or another, rather than use their commonsense or become masters of astrology or astronomy, bleated endlessly and ran down the Sikh hierarchy and authority at Amritsar. They called them illiterate and rural and accused them of not moving with the times or being modern enough. The global rolling stone pressure exerted by the rest of the expatriate ‘educated’ Sikhs forced the Amritsar authority to sanction a study.

Sod’s law, where idiots reign more idiots mushroom to champion the new idiotic thought.

A Sikh lecturer in Canada took hold of the reins, aware that if he could muster enough money for a seat at his university he would become a professor. He duly raised funds on the back of the emotional outcry over the Sikh calendar, and in his spare time he ‘studied’ astrology and astronomy.

Idiot can only lead idiots. The idiot led. Idiots followed. The authorities in Amritsar voiced their objections to the ideas taking root, only to be called rural (an insult in India denoting backwardness).

The idiotic professor, having secured his chair, became a chameleon, changing colour to suit his surroundings. He touched a raw nerve and exploited the belief that Sikhs were being misled by Hindus. The Hindus, he exhorted, have been manipulating the calendar since the beginning of time, and they caused the demise of Buddhism in India. He further claimed that the Hindus have every intention of overpowering Sikhism and turning it into a branch of Hinduism just as they did with Buddhism. He conveniently leaves aside the fact that Buddhism ebbed out of India and flourished in Greater India, Myanmar and beyond, simply because this suited its emotional requirements.

The Sikhs bought into the myth he spouted. The masses loved his delivery. After all, he was a professor at a Canadian university. One does not become a professor at a western university without deep powerful knowledge.

Wow. Deep powerful knowledge. Professorship! What next? Sun, shine, backside – and hey presto, a professorship!

The professor went on to detail how in 13,000 years January would become June, and June would become January, if Sikhs followed the Hindu calendar. All of this was down to the cunning Hindus and their calendar, insidiously mocking and subverting time.

All however was not lost. He had an answer to the problem. A knight in a shining armour he was for the Sikhs.

His solution?

That the Sikhs ditch the Hindu calendar. For, Sikhs are not slaves of Hindus. Instead, Sikhs should take up a solar-based calendar, the Gregorian calendar in effect.

Err, excuse me, is that not swapping one slave master for another? Never mind me, I’m just splitting hairs. Did you get that pun? Splitting hairs…and me, a Sikh!

The educated Sikhs clamoured for the company of the saviour professor. An alien Guru had descended on Sikhism from a university in Canada.

I recall how I stood alone and apart from the braying crowd on the issue. Nobody wanted to listen to facts when they could instead organise Sikhism’s separation from Hinduism, finally freeing themselves from those they believed were their progenitors. Nobody at the time wanted to hear or accept that Hinduism was invented 150 years after Sikhism. A minor detail, irrelevant, they told me.

So, the Sikhs recreated their calendar, throwing it in the faces of the very Gurus who had accepted the tradition of the Vedic calendar. The very same Gurus whose written word in Guru Granth Sahib Ji they themselves deem sacrosanct, were dismissed out of hand as a mirage, along with the calendar dates cited within the Sri Guru Granth Sahibji, because it suited the ‘educated’ Sikhs to do so.

The wonderment of the new Sikh calendar flew in the face of commonsense and reason. It gave Sikhdom a single shared date on which to celebrate the enthronement of one Guruji and the cremation of the preceding Guruji.

Educated idiots at their excellent idiotic best.

But, hey, at least the calendar separated Sikhs from Hindus. Never mind that the dates of events were now totally out of sync with reality, and were not in keeping with the monthly, lunar-cycle based prayers set forth in Sri Guru Granth Sahibji. You see, for all their denial about astrology, Sikhs in fact conduct prayers at the new moon as well as at the full moon, as set in the Sri Guru Granth Sahibji. But since the Vedic traditional cycle month, as accepted in the Sikh scriptures, starts one third of the way into the Gregorian calendar – or to put it accurately, the Gregorian calendar starts two thirds of the way into the Vedic calendar – the advent of the new Sikh calendar overthrew many a traditional event.

The basic fact which the Sikhs would not accept from me was that the alien Guru Professor from the Canadian university had misled. He did not share the information that the 13,000 year astrological process is in fact only half a cycle, and that when the full cycle takes place, after 26,000 years, June would again fall in June. But, hey, that’s a minor omission, as long as the Sikhs are able to cut their ties to Hindus. That the Hindus evolved after the Sikhs was another truth unacceptable to the Sikhs at the time of this debate.

When are we taking about? 1998.

Almost 20 years on, I am pleased to share with you that Sikhs are getting around to ditching the new calendar. In time, it will be totally ignored.

But, if you think a lesson has been learned by the Sikhs as a result of this debacle, hell no!

For now we have Maharani Preneet Kaur of Patiala, an MP there until 2014, who has funded, via a ‘Local Area Development’ scheme, the ‘Advance Centre for Technical Development of Punjabi language, Literature & Culture’, at the Punjabi University of Patiala.

Her Royal Highness Maharani Preneet Kaur is an excellent example of an apologist ignorant of real facts, who supports an idea as long as it sounds good and gives her credit in some way, shape or form.

The first point to note is that after more than half a century of independence, people like Her Royal Highness do not have the presence of dignity, mind, or credibility to use the correct spelling of Panjab or Panjabi, insisting instead on using the ignorant Anglo-Saxon spelling of Punjabi or Punjab.

So, what should I expect from her involvement other than ignorance masquerading as fact, and the advancement of false knowledge?

The study group has under the patronage of the Maharani announced on its website that a new set of letters has been added to Punjabi/Panjabi.

Excuse me, since when did Panjabi (Punjabi) become a separate script from Gurmukhi, (its original name) which was formulated by the Sikh Gurus, and completed particularly by the second Guruji, Guru Angaddevji, under instruction from Guru Nanakdevji, thereby making it sacrosanct? Panjabi is not a separate script from Gurmukhi. They are one and the same. Yet, Her Royal Highness, out of sheer ignorance, or desire for importance like the educated idiots, has allowed her name and prestige to be connected to a mess very much like that of the 1998 Sikh calendar change.

The argument she and her acolytes make is that as Sikhs interact on the global stage, so they adopt new foreign words, which in turn requires that Panjabi (Punjabi) create new alphabet letters to deal with them. Ok, let us examine their argument.

I have yet to come across a similar example in any of the European languages, where foreign words beget new letters in the alphabet. Even in Magyar, the language of Hungary, a language entirely separate from its neighbours and which is spoken by only 10-12 million people, new words find a resonance and are integrated within the existing vocal context and written spectrum. There is no inferiority complex requiring that the word be pronounced exactly as it is in its original language, or that new alphabet letters be arbitrarily created to pay such unnecessary homage.

The Anglo-Saxon spelling and pronunciation of the majority of Indian towns, cities and landmarks did not require race-Europeans to re-examine their own script to accommodate these Indian names and terms. To this day, I do not know what Punjab is or what it means. I know what Panjab is. But Punjab? No idea, other than a deliberate desire to insult the Sikhs by mispronouncing the name of their country.

Jaggernaath is a Vedic term limited to indicating a large rolling-wheeled mechanism that carries a particular Vedic, now Hindu, object of reverence and worship. Indian maturity and sensibility would never consider or allow the term to be used in any setting other than that. Anglo-Saxons abused the word and its connotation and designation. They changed its spelling to fit into English alphabetic constraints, whereupon it was spelled ‘juggernaut’, and came to mean a large-wheeled lorry carrying any kind of cargo including meat, whereas its function and name had originally referred to a conveyance limited to religious and faith-based use only.

Bombay. A word which people of my father’s generation and those before him found insulting, but which they were forced to use by the British. How on earth could the (arrogant) British not pronounce Mumbai? Instead, they overcame their own inferior self-worth through intimidation, bullying, and threats of exclusion from mainstream affairs, and forced Indians to adopt the new spelling and pronunciation of Mumbai. Hence, Bombay.

Avtar. The actual English spelling is meant to be Av-v-tar. Above the first ‘A’ is a diacritical mark that requires that the following character be pronounced twice. Yet the Anglo-Saxons initially insisted on pronouncing it as Avta. The ‘r’ would remain silent. Then the pronunciation in western America changed it to Av-a-taar. How on earth does Avataar spell Avtar?

Yoga/Joga. Yoga is very much older than Sanskrit, but is used in pure Sanskrit. Regardless, in all north Indian languages it has always been pronounced as Jog or Joga. The word Joga is used in Sri Guru Granth Sahibji by the Sikh Gurus. So, now, will Her Royal Highness champion the removal of the word Jog/Joga from north Indian speech because the Europeans are not familiar with the word and refuse to consider its usage? Europeans were initially introduced to the word Jog/Joga in the nineteenth century and it is found in the literature of that era. But imperial self-consciousness and lack of self-worth meant that the word had to be changed to Yoga, which the Europeans found to their consternation existed in pure Sanskrit.

In Panjabi we have a very soft ‘t’, a medium ‘t’, and a hard ‘t’. The English lexicon to date refuses to accommodate the need for the real three dimensational Panjabi letter ‘t’.

So, why, oh why, do the Panjabi and the Indian ruling elite think they have to construct new letters to accommodate words from around the world, in order to speak them as the natives do, lest they be accused of lacking ‘modernity’, when nobody else does?

If the Panjabi educated ruling elites’ sense of self-worth is measured by their servile need to create new Gurmukhi characters, then I invite them to huddle together and create a totally new alphabet for social, commercial and enterprise usage and to leave Gurmukhi alone as a language and a script solely for Sikh religious use.

If she is to be engaged in anything, let Maharani Preneet Kaur of Patiala sponsor and support that kind of activity. Her current course of action focused on denigrating Gurmuki/Panjabi script – and seemingly reinforced by the common person in Patiala who lionises her (but who those of her ilk cannot see as anything other than beggers and spongers) – is akin to the Nazi destruction of German literature in 1933.

Leave the gift of Gurmukhi alone.

Your Royal Highness Maharani Preneet Kaur of Patiala, please stop interfering in an excellent language originated by the Sikh Gurus, unless you feel you are better equipped and ought to supersede them. Your Royal Highness, you are making a colossal mistake. A mistake so gross in its ramifications, that it will be a harbinger of the demise of Sikhism as it stands.

Your Royal Highness, consider yourself advised…or reprimanded.

Your choice.

You choose.