Police Desecrate Sikh Gurdwara (West London) and Racially Profile Sikhs Entering Parliament

Facebook-inspired, rate-hate Anglo-Saxons are – with support from fascist European counterparts – still following me on social media. Recently they staged another dry-run on a local high street in London to assess how I would react in the event of a personal and potentially fatal attack against my older sister and myself. This time I informed the police, who, I understand, took decisive action – my thanks to them for doing so. Meanwhile, I continue to capture images of the individuals involved and post these online to expose them as race-hate fascists. 

Desecrating Darbaarsahibji

On 8th December 2018, Gurdwara Singh Sabha in Alice Way, Hounslow was desecrated by approximately 25 Metropolitan police officers, who entered the inner sanctum – addressed respectfully as Darbaarsahibji – wearing shoes, and with their heads uncovered. They did so consciously and with malice aforethought against the edicts of Sikhism. Their actions were designed to insult, denigrate, and demonstrate utter contempt for, Sikhism. 

How do we know the police desecration of Darbaarsahibji was deliberate? 

Because the Metropolitan Police trains and tutors officers in observing correct religious protocol, and paying heed to religious sensitivities and sensibilities. They are culturally aware. Therefore, there is no excuse for the manner in which the police officers entered the Gurdwara’s inner sanctum on 8th December. It can and must be viewed as a premeditated violation against the sacredness of Darbaarsahibji – a malicious cultural attack no less heinous than the Jawalianbagh massacre of Sikhs in 1919 ordered by General Dwyer of the British Army.  

The dispute that was underway at the Gurdwara in Alice Way, Hounslow, and to which the police officers were responding, was an internal Sikh dispute which the congregation should have been left to resolve. Those involved in the affray were barefoot and unarmed; and there was no threat to life. There was, in other words, no emergency. An impassioned disturbance of the peace, perhaps, in the confines of Darbaarsahibji, but nothing else. The situation did not, in any way, therefore call for the police to forego their cultural training – to go in with heads uncovered and shoes on.

The sad fact – illustrated in photographs of the event – is that the police were smiling smugly at having denigrated a Sikh place of worship, as if to say: I have just raped you, your religion, your Guru; and there is fuck all you can do about it.

At a bare minimum, the Metropolitan Police ought to pay for re-carpeting and for everything required to resacralise the holy space of Darbaarsahibji at the Gurdwara in Alice Way. I won’t bother demanding that the officers involved get re-trained in ethnic, cultural, religious etiquette – that’s the standard go-to, a soft way of appeasing victims which does nothing to remove the seed of racism that persists in offenders’ minds.

So what will be the repercussions of the police insult to Sikhism? Those of my ilk know that the spiritual-divine realm will exact punishment. Acts of deliberate desecration by one people against another are always severely punished. In this case, henceforth, the assailants will suffer from a multitude of diseases that which will affect and take the dignity and lives of everybody in their blood- and love-lines.

Ethno-religious profiling at U.K. Parliament

On 7th January 2019, my sister and I visited the U.K. Parliament. It was a break from our usual routes and routines when out and about, which the police monitor via trackers on our car and mobile phones.

But because we were venturing off the beaten track, plainclothes police officers and trained observers were also out in force – standing, walking, sitting at points along our car journey, supposedly inconspicuously, but in fact standing out like the proverbial sore thumb. They provided an extra layer of surveillance, useful for when I – in my mischievousness – manage to escape the tracker, which I did for a few minutes on the day of our visit to Parliament. (Note: counter-surveillance professionals use jamming devices, I just use my wits).

After a few minutes of escape, I resurfaced, and the look on the faces of plainclothes surveillance teams dotted around the landscape was one of pure relief as I went about parking the car and walking to the gates of Parliament to meet the group we were visiting with.

The first male police officer I encountered as we walked to enter looked at me and jabbed a finger at a chart citing prohibited items. No greeting, just that jabbing finger. I acknowledged him, viewed the chart, and walked on, at which point he spoke harshly and menacingly: ‘and no ceremonial knives either.’ I ignored the officer and walked on. I was with a group of mostly senior women citizens, after all, and the visit to Parliament was meant to be a treat which I didn’t want to spoil.

Under other circumstances, I would have engaged the officer directly and robustly about his lying, his deliberate denigration of the Sikh kirpan, and the ethno-religious profiling which framed his actions and words as follows:

  • The Offensive Weapons Act of 2018 is being amended to exclude the Sikh kirpan, as it is expressly a religious item.
  • Prior to the introduction of the law, it has been customarily agreed upon and accepted that the kirpan is religious, and can be carried everywhere by baptised adherents of the Sikh faith as one of the five kakkars.
  • Racial profiling is illegal.  

I did not, for reasons explained above, engage the offending police officer on these points. I simply walked on to security. There white people were asked to walk through one security channel, while everybody else was made to walk through another channel. 

The segregation was palpable.

Now, from experience at every security checkpoint I have ever been through, I know to pack an overloaded bag. For this simple reason: carrying only a small wallet, which is my preference, inevitably results somewhere along the line after security has been passed in my being body-searched, often – as happens at airports to most if not all non race-Europeans – invasively and verging on sexual abuse.

To avoid that, I stuff a bag full of items that has to be opened by security, so that if pat-downs occur they are part of the necessary process and not an explicit and smug violation. What can I say, I like to control the situation as much as possible. It gives me power, and takes away power from others to choose to violate me. Plus, it’s fun watching security jumping through hoops. 

At Parliament, everything at security went to plan: smug white officer smiling broadly at his colleagues around him as he announced that my stuffed bag needs to be opened and searched; all the officers beaming, collectively thinking probably that this ‘humiliation’ was as good as raping my mother; me succumbing, safe in the knowledge that the officer hadn’t had the chance this time to arbitrarily pick me out to be body-searched, and get an even bigger kick.

So, security navigated, we entered Parliament and took the 90minute tour. Eagle-eyed and observant as ever, I was able to make the following assessment of the officers who guard Parliament. It’s quite sobering…

Every officer inside Parliament looks like a sugar-puff. They collectively look to be suffering from a concoction of diseases, including diabetes, kidney problems, high cholesterol and heart problems. They appeared too unfit to walk 100 metres at a very brisk pace, let alone run more than 10 yards without gasping for air. The entire security personnel and apparatus in the U.K. Parliament could be overrun by ten adequately trained men in an attempted takeover. Armed officers I saw on my visit only appear bullish – they’d flee at the first sign of being overwhelmed. Helicopters hovering above the building would be powerless to do anything in response to the action unfolding inside. 

Parliament security is often referred to as a ‘ring of steel’. It is no such thing. Here is how to safeguard Parliament: using the same equipment and funds, replace the current personnel with Sikhs. Remove the concrete barriers around Parliament – they stink of fear and self-defeat. Remove signs prohibiting this and that – they read as ‘we, the race-Europeans are scared of you’. Allow free and unfettered access to Parliament for all. Nobody is going to attack with Sikhs on guard – their reputation for putting down aggressors is a matter of significant historical record; and one that the British colonizers relied on (along with that of the Nepali Gurkhas) to save their asses in war. It doesn’t say much for the current police safeguarding democracy if an officer could be so easily killed, as happened in London last year. (Unless you believe  that the death was collateral damage by a police force seeking to justify its demands for more funding). 

Let’s face it, current so-called security at Parliament is all smoke and mirrors, It is peopled by officers put out to grazing on soft operational duty, because they simply aren’t good enough to join the force outside or because they’re counting down the clock to retirement and a healthy pension. It is an absolute insult to the offices of the Prime Minister, the Cabinet, and all elected and non-elected members of Parliament – and to the so called bastion of western democracy!

MYTH: UK’S INTEGRATION HYPE INCITEMENT TO MURDER

Having lived in the United Kingdom for over 50 years I thought I had seen all the good, bad and ugly that Great Britain has to offer. Yet since the mid-70s I have held the view that I am living in the UK on borrowed time, as integration is solely dependent on the indigenous people’s willingness to allow dignified cultural and religious disparity to take place while maintaining equal access to resources and amenities for all.

I recall vividly the degrading and disgusting names Sikhs were called regarding their turban, as well as in reference to their brown colour skin and their consumption of garlic, onion and ginger-enriched food.

In those days, out of sheer politeness and maturity in the face of what they recognised as the retarded mentality of the locals, the Asians in the UK kept their opinions about the natives to themselves.

Then race laws were introduced, banning racist references. Equality became enshrined in law. Cooperation and coexistence seemed feasible and, on the whole, tolerance, understanding and mutual appreciation evolved over the ensuing decades.

On 7th Oct 2017, I ventured into the social media platform of Facebook for the first time. Using a photo of myself and an Indian nickname that also sounded a tad anglicized, I joined several groups. One of these was called “ALL JOKES, ONE LINERS AND GREAT GAGS WITH REASONABLE ADMIN”. The group had 18,600 members, made no bones about the fact that it was a hard-hitting, over-the-top, no-holds-barred, adult humour group. I was happy joining since my humour and second-rate wit can on most occasions hold their own; and of course, the group wasn’t likely to throw anything at me that I had not heard before. Approval to join the group came through and I began to read the posts.

As promised, the FB group was hyper-racist, homophobic and misogynist to the core. Reference to female genitalia was an accepted and standard norm in the construction of any given sentence by the contributors, who were white men. I only came across two women: one with a sensible, middle-of-the-road humour and wit, and the other engaging in badly disguised full-on race hatred.

I introduced myself to the group, my profile image visibly establishing me as a Sikh gentleman with a full grey beard and a white turban. I wrote that I had already heard most, if not all, of the stuff they were likely to hurl at me, and that rest assured I would give as good as I got.

Right from the start, my religion and turban were targeted. Indeed, an initial remark used the exact same wording we Sikhs used to hear in the 1960s. This means that although racism was successfully removed from open public dialogue decades ago, it has been passed down the generations, from great-grandfathers through to great-grandchildren. Without hesitation, I retorted with a frank put-down, which silenced the guy who made the racist remark. He never made a comment to me again. I, in my social media naivete, thought he had gone on holiday until I was told he had blocked me. It became clear to me that I was dealing with grown men who could dish it out but became cry babies when it came to taking it.

Generally, I would make an observation, draw people into responding, and then fend them off with a sophisticated put-down, leaving a third person who was observing the exchange to smile and ask the other person, ‘What does it feel like to be played?

Rather than take it all in good grace, once the members of the FB group realised I could match their observational humour, the gloves came off. Explicitly degrading and disgusting religious, racial, cultural and dietary remarks came thick and fast.

By this time, I was on my third day into this experience. Concerned that there were zero non-white contributors, I scoured the list of group members and found pages and pages of people with African and Southeast Asian images and names – who had never participated in the group at all and seemed, to all intents and purposes, to be fake accounts. They were a front for the UK natives to spout their vitriolic race-hatred could flourish unbounded. The penny dropped that this was the real underbelly of the ordinary natives of Great Britain: their race hatred had flourished throughout the decades, and been passed down through the generations. It did not begin with Brexit.

The attacks on me by members of the FB group became more personal and direct. Seven days later, I decided to write my first post. I informed the group that in many cases their names, when translated into Asian languages, have explicit toilet meanings; and that they, like the rest of the animal world, have disgusting body odour, bad breath and stinky homes. In fact, if they were to meet an honest South-east Asian, this person would tell them that the average European’s freshly-washed smell is like sick.

Well, I could not believe it, my post disappeared. I inquired about what had happened to it. Terrance Ward, one of the group administrators, wrote back: ‘Didn’t you get the message?’ ‘What message is that?’ I asked in all innocence. I had been blocked. Given that the FB group was advertised as an adult, no-holds-barred humour group and its members posted the same, why block me when I had suffered a whole gambit of racial, cultural, religious and dietary abuse?

I left it there, trying to see the funny side of the group’s hypocrisy. My last exchange with them was on 13th October 2017.

Since then, I and my 70 yr old sister have suffered an onslaught of race-hate intimidation, leaving both of us in no doubt that we, and especially me, are going to be killed. The type of race-hate that was the norm in the 1960s is alive and well in our locality. All the Anglo-Saxons of our area check out the car when we are out driving, then the car registration number, and me with my white turban. In the initial days following the final denouncement of my FB group experience, a volley of venomous racial abuse spewed from their mouths. The underlying violent intent was immediately evident, and required only a trigger to be unleashed.

We reported the matter to the police. They noted the details of our case and our genuine belief that we are going to be murdered. The local community police officers contacted us subsequently, and set in motion the requisite procedures.

Like all people, our days follow a set itinerary. It is incredibly easy to log our movements and target us. Thus, regardless where we travel in our locality we are targeted. They, the rednecks, work in teams via multimedia mobile phones: logging the time they see us, they pass the message onwards about the direction we’re traveling, and as soon as we reach a certain landmark another two lookouts are already there waiting to check us out and pass the information further down the line. This has now translated into the message going out to a collective and who-so-ever thereafter notices us feeds back our movement information.

We take photos of them, and their car registrations numbers. WE HAVE THE NAMES AND PHOTOS OF THE CONTRIBUTORS FROM THE FACEBOOK GROUP “ALL JOKES, ONE LINERS, AND GREAT GAGS WITH REASONABLE ADMIN”… AND WE WILL NOT HESITATE TO PUT THESE ONLINE ACROSS SEVERAL MEDIA SITES IN ORDER TO OUT THESE RACIST PSYCHOPATHS.

Now, the question for Anglo-Saxons is this: If you, the indigenous can dish out racist toilet humour then how come you guys can’t take it?

All of a sudden the British bulldogs have turned into pussies? Integration and tolerance means verbal abuse is a two-way street. But for you Anglo-Saxons it just seems to mean that you get to rant, rave, and blame ‘others’ for everything without showing any modicum of maturity. You dish out abuse but can’t take the truth that comes your way. And an inferiority complex and low self-esteem leads you to kill rather than accept that, to others, perhaps your names do reference toilet habits, and you do smell.

You’re a race of psychopaths.

The media who represent you – e.g. The Daily Mail, The Daily Express and a selection of LBC radio presenters – should do the honourable thing for once and publicly announce what you and they really believe: that integration is bullshit (before returning to their usual racial venom).

Because real integration means that if you’re going to indulge in degrading racial abuse towards others, you have to accept the same back.

Sikh Turban, Women & Dasam Granth

The turban of old signified authority, supreme evolved thought, balanced judicial judgment, chivalry, integrity, gallantry, graciousness, politeness, honesty, and deference to higher authority and thought.

In the same way that the system of female global leadership, supported by male life-partners, fell into disarray, so the prestige of the turban fell from grace… until the Sikh elite (the Khalsa) was formed and made to bear secular responsibility.

Following the last evolutionary realignment, seers and sants were unequivocally instructed to shed their aloof dispositions, and instead live their lives of advanced awareness while also fully participating in the secular world, lest their spiritual progress be permanently stopped. This strata of the secular sant is embodied in the Khalsa – the elite of advanced awakening.

The first five Khalsa were beheaded. They lay prone, until Guriji fused together heads and bodies (not in their original configurations, it should be noted) and administered amrit, produced and infused with female energy via Mataji. The beheaded came back to life. But they were not yet invested with the ethical responsibility required of them and that was to be part of their hyphenated secular-spiritual existence moving forward.

The investiture of secular roles and responsibilities for the Khalsa came in the form of the five articles of faith. The first of these, unshorn hair, signifies creation, which is protected and celebrated by the five-metre long male turban and the three-metre long female chunni. The male turban and the female chunni are therefore one and the same.

The turban signals to others that the wearer is ready to defend and protect the weak and oppressed; and women need only wear the turban if no men are available to carry out their responsibility, and only in a context of war and hand-to-hand combat.

For a woman to wear a turban outside of these conditions is an insult to men; it questions the latter’s capacity to fulfill their secular responsibility and it casts aspersions on their valour.

‘Educated’ Sikhs, however, have argued that the turban may be worn by women as well as men. Indeed, they positively demand this ‘freedom’, stating that Guruji instructs the very same. Their claim refers to a poem written by one of the Gurujis. Now, poems as we know are full of metaphor and allegory. They are artistic productions in which poets – like the particular Guruji noted here, who wrote fluently in five languages – take liberties with language to produce certain lyrical and rhythmic effects. And when rendering this in multiple languages… well, we all know the innate untranslatability of words across different languages… then the task becomes one of reaching for a sense and meaning that fits with that language.

So, those who call upon the particular poem in question here to support their claim and ‘right’ for females to wear the male turban, and who see in the poem an injunction to do so, in fact see nothing of the poem beyond their own imperfect interpretation – itself a dynamic product of their individual, social, cultural, political and ideological milieu. To fully know the poem, they really ought in fact to master poetry and the five languages in which Guruji wrote – leaving their own literal reading of the poem, which reflects nothing more than their own desires, at the door.

An important point here: the poem is attributed to a particular Guruji despite being penned in a language whose vocabulary and syntax made use of diacritical marks that post-date the Guruji. This along with several individual theses, pothis and books was eventually brought together into a single volume in 1890. This volume is the Dasam Granth. It contains Jaap Sahibji and Benti Chaupeeji – both of which are inaccurately attributed to Guru Gobind Singhji. These poems (for they are not banis) were subsequently integrated into morning and evening Sikh prayers – confusing and needlessly so.

The alleged poetry by Guru Gobind Singhji forms part of the Dasam Granth and sits side by side with poetry that embellishes eroticism, including BESTIALITY, along with five extremely erotic practices written in detailed pornographic terms alongside mantric and tantric material (which would include kundalini yoga). The entire volume appeals neatly to those within Hinduism who are on the cusp of leaving it in dissatisfaction, and who are mesmerised by the pure subjective Sikhism of Sri Guru Granth Sahibji. And in this volume, long hair or a full untrimmed beard is not a prerequisite; however, ‘keski’ the smaller under-turban, is sanctioned. Based on this misinterpretation contained in Dasam Granth indication is apparently given to wear a turban as one of the five Ks instead of hair – or so it is argued by the likes of the Akhand Kirtani Jatha amongst others. In that case, bestiality is also acceptable, is it?

It is a red herring to assume that the term ‘Dasam’ invokes Guru Gobind Singhji’s authorship of the material contained therein. Sikhs have been thrown, and erroneously shepherded, into this assumption because the word is associated with the number 10, and of course Guru Gobind Singhji was the tenth Guruji. Not wishing to dishonour the elaborate work of Dasam Granth, the Sikh hierarchy gave the publication respect, as they would any other scripture. This accommodation then became the platform for the dissatisfied exiting Hindus into Sikhism to argue in favour of the alleged poems of Guru Gobind Singhji to be formally included into the mainstream Sikh prayers.

One has to consider the period in which this took place. Sikhs had faced an almost total wipeout, with more than forty percent of its population killed during two encounters against an overwhelming army. Thus, any new recruits into Sikhism were positively welcomed, and they held sway. It was a pivotal moment, therefore, when compromises were made including acknowledging the alleged poem – that is the crux of the argument by those favouring female turban-wearing – by Guru Gobind Singhji as a formal bani. In the case of Jaap Sahibji and Benti Chaupeeji, once these attained bani status their integration into formal morning and evening prayers was a mere formality. Unfortunately, until Sikh authority does not officially rescind the Dasam Granth banis to their original status as poetry, their controversial use and attribution remains.

Reverting….

The second point: the saddest part is loyalty to a thought, and inability to give up a cherished ideal, such as that of the under-turban as the formal arbiter of Sikh identity.

Additionally, why, I ask (up to this moment in time), are Sikh women using a literal (mis)reading of a poem to configure their self-worth around the right to wear the turban in place of the chunni, or even – as is happening – underneath it? Why adopt a form of purdah whose removal Guru Nanakdevji was pivotal in championing along with other freedoms and respect for women?

Guru Nanakdevji successfully championed the thought that only a free and trusted woman was capable of giving birth to a child born into freedom of thought and freedom from a slave mentality. Indeed, only with a woman’s permission could a child, especially a boy, be born. He maintained that women, of all races, ought to be responsible for their own sexuality and sense of sexual integrity. He impressed upon Sikhs that men had possessions, and women belongings; and that no man possessed the women in his life, but that they belonged to these women.

Guru Nanakdevji impressed about Sikhs that man is answerable to woman, not the other way around. It may often look like women take a back seat in public and let men run the show; but in Sikhism, ultimate authority lies with women.

So, why, I ask as a Gursikh who takes pride in dressing as chicly as possible, do exquisitely beautiful Sikh women feel the need to emulate men, and forego their natural beauty as women?

The very purdah that Guru Nanakdevji fought to bring you out of, you are now throwing back in his face. You are hell-bent on assuming the Muslim woman’s head-to-toe covering – yet, the Sikh fought to free women in India from slavery and from the religious injunctions of successive empires. Now, living in a free land, you chuck the valour and deaths of your ancestors back into their faces.

In times to come, medical procedures will make surgically attached fully-functioning penises available – will you demand those too, in order to feel fully human? It is not Sikhism which maintains gender inequality – but you are using Sikhism as the battleground for fighting the hierarchies and inequalities of the world around you…. and unfairly so.

Look to Sikhism. Understand that therein women are regarded as life’s teachers; men as life’s students. A man, having reached the highest echelons of inner awareness possible for man, can only aspire to the next layer of progress if he is born into the female phenomena. That is, man has to be born as woman in order to evolve further. This is a highly simplified version of a deeply complex, sometimes contradictory and confusing system, so I am keeping it simple… but consider this: religion tends to focus on men rather than on women, on teaching men of the faith rather than women.

As I said: women are life’s teachers; men, life’s students.

And yet, here you are – so many of you Sikh women today – fighting for a right to be like your men, when you’re already so much more advanced than them. But, go on, please, trample over all the hard-won struggles of your forbears in the Sikh faith, seek out turbans today, penises tomorrow.

Reflections on proposed caste discrimination legislation: or ‘What is this thing called caste?’

The question I put to the British parliament is this; Why is her Majesty and the entire stratum she occupies not included in the proposed caste law, and why is it limited to race and aimed only at South Asians as it is currently tabled?

The Merriam-Webster dictionary definitions of caste are as follows:

  • One of the hereditary social classes in Hinduism that restrict the occupation of their members and their association with members of other castes.
  • A division of society based on differences in wealth, inherited rank, or privilege, profession, occupation or race.
  • The position conferred by caste standing.
  • A system of rigid social stratification characterized by hereditary status, endogamy, and social barriers sanctioned by custom, law, or religion.

My argument:

Please read Caste, Class and Community in India: An Ethnography Approach by Balmurli Natrajan (William Paterson University).

The article’s argument supports my view that we are confusing class/economic distinctions with caste, such that the economic status of social groups is being projected onto, and even conflated with, social caste.

The fact is that like-minded social groups gel and function together as they have intimate nuanced understanding that cannot be accessed by other groups. To put it another way: we humans are neither psychologically nor socially identical, and do not share the same life experiences. This does not, at least in various Indian cultures, emerge as prejudice but is rather a form of snobbishness verging at times on hostility.

Precisely because of this, it makes sense therefore that individual social groups practice social endogamy and establish their own kinship clubs – Gurdwaras are a case in point. And they should be encouraged in doing so.

My point is that caste is a paradigm encased in structured cosociality rather than in subjugation and unequal power relations.

(And if we are talking about the latter, it is worth noting that I have repeatedly experienced rejection by well-to-do so-called lower castes – which blows apart the idea that oppression works in one direction only!)

The problem with the proposed legislation against caste discrimination is that it is embedded in the notion that caste is a form of unequal class/economics relations. It simply does not recognise the cosociality of caste as a valid, necessary and comforting form of in-group identity.

But consider this: in playgroups, babies can clearly be seen exhibiting strong likes and dislikes towards each other; they congregate in like-minded groups. Who taught them such prejudice? No-one. We human-animals psychologically attach ourselves to, and associate and intermingle with like minds.

This is not prejudice. What precisely it is, we have yet to sort out.

Now, for those who say caste as practiced today – in the form of class/economic inequality and hostility – is a historical phenomenon within South Asian societies… go learn your history!

Buddhism, Sikhism and Vedism in earlier times – before Bharat lost her substantial lands and succumbed to successive periods of colonization – did not apply caste divisions as we understand them today.

Indeed, caste division is not ‘Indian’ at all. It began in the west as a form of rigid social organisation whereby people were not permitted to work outside the occupational bandwidths set by the state, as happening to trades people in the United States. The Roman Empire relied on this to protect itself from implosion. Thus, caste refers in this sense to established western practices of restricting people to certain occupational domains, which restricted them socially and economically.

Such casteism continues to operate in the west today, as a cursory examination of recent English history illustrates. The cost of moving beyond the barriers of one’s caste was experienced by King Edward VIII when he deigned to marry Wallis Simpson – he had to abdicate. Even Prince Charles was not permitted to marry at will, but was shepherded into a marriage of convenience.

All of this is not to say that caste is not an aspect of Indian cultures. But as I noted earlier, it was certainly not a feature of earlier Buddhist, Sikh or Vedic societies, especially not in the western form of restricting people to particular occupational bandwidths.

Originally, in Bharat, children were given into the care of faith-teachers whose task was to find the appropriate occupation and role of their wards, and to encourage them to fulfil that. So, a farmer’s child with artisan skills would be encouraged in that direction, while the child of unskilled workers would move into farming if they exhibited the abilities for such work. It followed that people did not necessarily follow in their parents’ footsteps; they moved across groupings freely based on their skills-set.

It also follows that parents did not prize financial solvency when looking for life-partners for their children, rather they laid greater store by a prospective son- or daughter-in law’s capacity to manage their affairs responsibly and maturely.

However, older western societies have come to exert a strong influence on the modern construct that is Hinduism, which is itself the product of a socio-political revolution against the perceived rigidities of Vedic practices. Ironically, Hindusim has curated the kind of casteism for which the whole of India has become renowned, and which it erroneously embraces as an inalienable and intrinsic aspect of itself.

Consequently, we forget that caste refers to a bandwidth of in-group intimacies that in fact have been vital in enabling the successful transnational flow of people. Sikhs and others who moved to East Africa or to the United Kingdom were intrepid aspirants, but they were only able to ease the isolation that migration brings by congregating with others who shared their language, diet, rites and rituals, and who could advise them of local mores and provide a network of support.

Against the cosociality that caste traditionally referred to in older Indian societies and cultures, is the highly stratified system of difference which it exhibits in the west and which we forget to call out because we are so busy misunderstanding and denigrating our own eastern cultural heritages and practices.

And if we are in doubt as to the rigid boundaries that caste builds in the modern western world, let’s consider how our kids from North America and England emerge from university with degrees – equipping them to practice some trade or other, but which actively preclude them from switching trade or following another occupational strand. For that, they have to go right back to university and re-train, and get re-certified.

The same restrictions apply ofcourse to trades-people. Since the emphasis is on economic security and socio-economic mobility, very few people get to change occupational track despite showing flair and having accumulated skill-sets that make them ideal for jobs other than those they’ve been certified to do. The moral degeneracy of this situation is that it stratifies people, restricting them ‘to their own kind’. Yet, when they embody such stratification and hierarchy, we call them out and propose anti-caste legislation. When the system itself enforces this, why blame the people for imbibing it?!

And to what degree will anti-caste legislation be enforced? Will Gurdwaras have to provide a register of how many people of other castes (cosocial cultural groupings, as they themselves see it) attend in order to stay on the right side of the law? What counts as discrimination? Will I, as somebody who has repeatedly experienced discrimination from so-called lower castes, be safe-guarded and be able to pursue my case under law?

Will the British monarchy be allowed to continue to exist in its closed forms, while the average person on the street gets vilified for belonging to a group they know intimately and feel a sense of support, security and belonging with?

Clearly, I am missing the point of the anti-caste legislation, because it feels to me very much like a stick with which to beat Indians. And the best thing is, we Indians are culpable in this, because we know nothing of our own history or that of caste as a phenomenon.

Bhindrawale: an alternative view

‘The Sikhs are the only race, that I know of, who sacrificed their own nationhood in order to free the non-Sikh population of India from more than one thousand years of humiliation, subjugation and occupation at the hands of not just one but two (Semitic) Empires. They did so having fought for and secured their own independence as a nation under Islam rule more than 200 years earlier.’ Avtar

For you to appreciate this hard-hitting essay I need to explore, examine, and briefly lay bare what is a Sikh.

It is a misnomer that being born into a practicing Sikh family makes you a Sikh. Certainly, children practice the rites and ritual of Sikhi. But that is learned behaviour. Even when mimicking their elders, and perhaps even aspiring to be a proper Sikh through such mimicry, children are not Sikh in the metaphysical sense.

A Sikh, as I have written countless times, is a strata above the realm of advanced Sants, Svamis, Sufis, and Saints. A sant is one who has absolute mastery over the psychic realm. A Sikh is responsible for the welfare of the sant realm.

At the times of, and attendant in seva to, the ten Sikh Gurus, (and due to the high originality of advanced innovation), a Sikh was an unbelievably calm pacifist, who, when required, would to lay to rest a repeat killer. The Sikhs of those times never had need to raise their voice. Their psychic bearing and presence was enough.

Bear in mind, in those times artificial voice projecting apparatuses such as the megaphone and later the mic and loudspeaker system, had not yet been developed. So, an orator of that period, regardless of faith, literally had to shout to get his message across. Shouting behaviour has not died, in India at least. People there seem to forget that they are using microphones, and can therefore speak gently. The screaming and shouting automatically raises one’s blood pressure, heightens one’s nervous system activity, and leads to a tensed physiology, which renders one primed for a physical confrontation. The person sounds and behaves assertively.

Another problem of the birth-Sikhs is that they are reared on stories of historical events that highlight bravery, courage, chivalry, and heroism. These are stories of fighting the odds and succeeding, more often than not. However, the Sikh parent imparting such stories is themselves not a Sikh in its full reality, but like their child a Sikh by birth only. And therein lies the problem of Sikhism.

A Sikh is one who, coming from any faith, is the master of, and has hands-on responsibility for, those who are an authority over the so-called spiritual world. That was what separated the Sikhs of the Gurus from the faithful of all other faiths.

Only the best of the best, the most humble of the humble, found a way to be in the seva of the Sikh Gurus. Some attributes of a Sikh:

* An analyser, scrutiniser, and improver…of whatever they may confront

* Addressing every female as ‘Ma’am’ and treating every female with dignity, chivalry, and lack of misogyny

* Studies war tactics and stealth strategy

* Master of hand-arms combat

* Outmanoeuvers opponents strategically

* Sikh men/women are regarded as tender, passionate, sensual lovers by most South Asians

* Remain faithful and loyal to one partner

* Their word is sacrosanct

Only with the above clarity will you be able understand today’s essay.

Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale

According to web searches he was born Jarnail Singh Brar on 2nd June 1947, and he died on 6th June 1984 aged 37. Leader of Damdami Taksal, one of the five formal seats of Sikhism, he was an outspoken orator. He voiced the resentment of the ordinary Sikh about their betrayal by the Hindus: leading up to and even after India’s independence, the Hindus had promised a separate Sikh nation; they reneged on this promise.

His popularity stemmed from his insistence that the faithful remain vigilant, and abide by the high requirements of the elite Sikhs, the Khalsa. Like the majority of Sikhs, he saw the events of bygone times through rose-tinted glasses, rather than accepting that society has always been a multi-spectrum of misfits who dally with idealism and bemoan the failures of others.

The majority of Sikh ‘leaders’ increasingly fail to appreciate what it takes to become a Sikh, and that there are unbelievably high standards of advanced knowledge required to progress into the Khalsa realm. The same was true of Bhindranwale, except that in his case his heart was in the right place. Like other leaders, though, he was not advanced enough to recognise the what or the why that makes a Sikh and the Khalsa uniquely responsible and thus special.

An insight: The sublime is experienced by nearly all practicing Sikhs as a faith-right; however, collectively, it remains an unquantifiable realm. They are moved and ‘protected’ by this arena, but they are oblivious as to how best to describe its existence, or the experiences it yields.

He was precisely in the same boat as your average run-of-the-mill Sikh. Like them, he too sensed, but he could not explain the sensation.

He was a doer, a go-getter, one who could not sit still. He readily took a stance against anything or anyone whom he considered to have fallen from the excellence he thought all Sikhs should live by. Drugs, a hedonistic lifestyle, and irreverence for the image of the perceived Sikh status quo rankled him. His generation blamed all society’s ills on the wealth that Panjab enjoyed as the green, agricultural energy-field of India. Panjab literally fed, and to this day feeds, India. This brought prosperity.

Prosperity in tandem with zero pressure of either local wars or impending invasions, led to parents showering their children with monetary gifts hitherto unheard of in India. Sikhs were, and are, massively wealthy compared to the rest of the non-west European world. In fact, when I traveled the countries that were at that time locked behind the iron curtain almost twenty years after leaving Panjab, I was shocked to see those countries suffering from lower, weaker, almost non-existent infrastructure; and the local poverty was breathtakingly shocking even in comparison to the Panjab of twenty years earlier.

So, Panjab was wealthy. Wealthy enough to send members of their family to study abroad, and indeed to live abroad; these members in turn sending remittances back to the family village and home, thereby increasing the family’s earning and power-prestige further.

The handicap of wealth is improved health. Health, married to wealth, automatically childs conceit, self-importance and delusions of the self as an omnipotent being. Sikhs of his time suffered from the same disease of the avant-garde, technicolour palette of romanticism seducing monologue, with philosophies spiced with short-lived interactions with European industrial civilisation.

In a mixture of multi-complex rationales, he laced his oratory skills with the insistence that wealthy Sikhs ought to pressure their children towards the rites normally associated with a Sikh monastic lifestyle. Its conditions are so confusing to an outsider, especially when each male is meant to see each woman as his sister or mother, yet be anxiously prepared to marry one of these very women, and thereafter, to engage in and enjoy a full sexual life with her. It’s a case of heads I win, tails you cannot live a normal lifestyle, unless you marry. These rich kids, emasculated by the parental pressure he advocated, threw tantrums.

He, meanwhile, gained fame and popularity. For he constantly evoked age-old glories of sword-fighting, small hand-arms defence, and overcoming outrageous odds against trained armies of invaders, or indeed against ‘home grown’ newly settled Muslim rulers. He drew crowds. He spoke uncompromisingly, mired in passion as if he had returned fresh from sword-fighting and hand-to-hand combat. Sikhs so love tales of hand-to-hand combat against overwhelming odds…his popularity increased exponentially. However, he had never set a foot on a battlefield, and he had no formal or informal military and tactical training.

He was an orator, one who had the ability to inflame his audience. He evoked passions. His message stirred people. He became an irresistible force. This drew the attention of the politicians. However kitsch he appeared to seasoned politicians nevertheless he commanded a sizeable vote bank that they couldn’t ignore. So, his ego was massaged, and seduction-hypocrisy gained momentum. Everything has a price. He had a price. It was a matter of identifying that price and leveraging him into the politicians’ pocket.

His price?

A date with destiny, a reluctant delusion that he was ‘chosen’ to deliver respect, along with self-determination to Sikhs within the statehood of a collective India.

Expatriate Sikhs stoked, inflamed, and financially supported calls for an independent state named Khalistan (and not Panjab). I truthfully cannot recall him advancing that particular idea, but the theme of self-determination never left his lips. In reality, all he sought – and as is the demand of all Sikhs – was dignity via the fulfillment of a promise; and the honest barter of that promise made to Sikhs by Pandit Nehru and (Mohan Dass Gandhi) Mahatama Gandhi, in the days before India’s independence.

This set him on a collision course. Prime Minister Indira Gandhi stepped into the ring and offered a staged, well-practiced trade-off; stopping short of Sikh demands for the fulfillment of the Anandpur Sahib Resolution.

A dance of Shiva had begun.

Death was on the cards.

Each thought it would be the other’s.

The death drum gathered speed.

And he made one naive mistake after another. He miscalculated the world of politics. In fact, he had zero appreciation of politics. He did not understand that you cut a tree for firewood one day and the next day you stand on its stump delivering a speech pronouncing your credentials as an ecologist.

His lack of military service became evident in his utterances. He took the bait. He prepared to take on the might of the Indian army’s modern weaponry and tactics with his handful of men equipped with small arms weapons. He was neither a politician, nor a strategist or tactician. His popularity was based on his honesty, earnestness and frankness. He lacked guile. He lacked deceit. He lacked hypocrisy. He lacked cunning. What he said was what he meant. Wonderful attributes for a religious orator. But as a politician and military tactician he was a dead duck.

If he had had a cunning mind, then he would and could have instigated a war between Pakistan and India. This would have brought the Sikh regiments stationed far afield from Panjab back to the border with Pakistan, which in the main is shared by Pakistan and Panjab. Simultaneously, he would, on the quiet, have had his own followers present in various cities ready to occupy main-frame buildings; the armed occupation of which would have put him in control of mass broadcast, and of transportation, thereby causing maximum and immediate mayhem among the people. Thereafter, he could have incited the Sikh regiments to support his quest for the negotiation of the Anandpur Sahib Resolution from a position of reasonable strength. Just for the fun of creating discord and facilitating the possible breakup of India, Pakistan would have supported him to the hilt, politically and militarily.

However, he did what no Sikh army had done in Sikh history. He occupied the holy shrine of Amritsar not for its protection from an imminent attack but for sheltering in. After all, prior to his occupation Amritsar was under absolutely no threat from an imminent Indian army attack.

A majority of expatriate Sikhs were against his occupation of Amritsar. Yes, he had supporters, but they were a minority, albeit a vocal one.

The outcome?

A foregone conclusion.

A mere formality.

He totally played into the hands of the politicians.

The rest is history.

I witnessed the events here in the UK, and am shocked by how many of the people who ridiculed him at the time, including his lack of education, now address him as a glorified, proud, fearless Sikh General.

Yes, they call him General!

He was an innocent man, honest and sincere as the day is long. But a General? Are Sikhs really that desperate that they equate his tactics with those of a General? I absolutely will credit him with fearlessness, courage and strength of character. He did not sell himself short. But a General? Come on, please, you Sikhs can do better than that. Give him plaudits, but let us not get carried away with overly emotional praise either.

Having said that, for me as a Sikh, he gave me the one thing no one else had delivered up to that point.

Let me explain.

While traveling Europe I would come across veterans of the first and the second European war (1914-18 and 1939-45) who many a time would present themselves to me as admirers of the Sikh soldiers and battalion, and who would salute me as an orthodox young Sikh. Apart for these European war veterans, everyone else would confuse me for an Arab, Muslim or indeed a Hindu. I was never recognised as a Sikh.

Because of this sincere, honest, earnest Sikh preacher, today I am recognised globally as a Sikh, part of a nation of people who gave up their own kingdom, their country, in order to free India.

My nation, a people I am proud to call my own, the Sikhs, made a selfless sacrifice foregoing their own nation for the sake of securing freedom for what is now more than a billion people in India.

Yes, the ruling classes cheated us out of a promise. But that is the political Hindu for you. The citizen Hindu and Muslim of India, by contrast, categorically maintains that we do deserve our own statehood. I thank them for their support.

Yet in today’s India, the arrogance of some Hindu politicians is leading them to proclaim that all citizens of India are Hindus.

I once again want to remind them that ‘Hindu’ is neither a race nor a religion.

Hindi is a communal language of communication that slowly gathered momentum following its birth just over one hundred and fifty years after the establishment of Sikhism.

Hindi is like the fabled pan-European language Esperanto. Nothing more and nothing less.

And as for Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale: Sikhs, he was a seasoned preacher, a Giani. He was not a Sant in any shape or form. Please, let us not get over emotional about his credentials. Let us be sincere in our evaluation.

As a Giani, what he achieved for Sikhism is that which the best amongst us will never be able to emulate or attain. He gave me global recognition, a global presence. And, no, I do not accept the excuse that globally, in the age of the internet, race Europeans mistake me for a Muslim. The truth is that they hate me because of the colour of my skin – pure and simple. It is race and culture hatred that they exercise. And the easiest way to murder me is to call me a Muslim. Race Europeans are neither that ignorant nor that stupid that they cannot tell me apart from a Muslim. Exactly how many Muslims in the western world walk around with their traditional very loose cloth wound around their heads? I have only ever seen three in all my years of living in race European countries.

So, the fact that the world now views me as a Sikh must be credited entirely to this one, very basically educated, sincere orator/preacher, who merely wanted the dignity and self-esteem of the Sikhs to be respected by the Hindu Government – the very Hindus who until 1946 had been slaves in their own land for just a little over one thousand years.

Sikhs deserve their dignity and self-esteem to be respected by the Hindu Government of India.

And on the anniversary death of this preacher I hope and pray it will begin to accept a world where Sikhs, Muslims, Buddhist, Jains, Christians and Hindus can live in peace with each other in the land we now call India: as autonomous cultures, languages, heritages, and dignities that together protect our collective defence, economy and infrastructure as these exist now.

 

 

Meditation within: Mechanical Time, Organic Time & Timelessness (German Time Vs Brexit Time)

European concept of time:

On 31st December 1899, a second was determined to be 1/31, 556,952.9747th of a mean solar day. In 1955, the second was re-calculated, using the caesium beam atomic clock, as 1/86,400th of a mean solar day. The present European concept of time was set then, in 1955. The quantum clock led to the femtosecond which is to a second what a second is to 31.71 million years, and to an attosecond, which is to a second what a second is to 31.71 billion years. That clock was superseded in 2015 by an optical lattice clock.

However, earth’s rotation, in conjunction with the galaxy and the universe, is irregular and slowing down, and the mechanical clock is utterly dysfunctional with and irrelevant to bio-organic time phase.

Arya concept of time:

Yuga:-

There are four yugas – Satya, Treta, Dvapara, and Kali. These each have a pre-determined duration lasting millions of years, and they follow each other cyclically. A cycle comprising the four yugas is known as a maha-yuga. Within this is the life span of the earthlings, demi-gods (please check wikipedia for a list of Arya and Greek demi-gods), and gods (Brahma etc).

Satya yuga – 1,728,000 years – golden age

Trata yuga – 1,296,000 years – silver age

Dvapara yuga – 0,864,000 years – bronze age

Kali yuga – 0,432,000 years – iron age

1 Maha yuga – 4,320,000 years

 

The Maha yuga is cyclical in both descending and ascending phase.

 

71 Maha yuga = 1 Manvantara (destruction and then recreation)

1000 Maha yuga = 1 kalpa (night of Brahma)

1000 Maha yuga = 1 Kalpa (day of Brahma)

1 day of demi gods = 360 earth days

 

Demi-Gods live for 100 years of their time scale, and are offspring of gods and humans.

Brahma lives for 100 years of its time scale, dies, after which a new Brahma evolves.

(It should to be noted that the Arya resuscitated the existence of the decimal point and the zero, without which astronomical calculations were impossible. They also re-established negative indices and algebraic rules).

Similar to modern timescales the Arya had a name for sub-atomic units of time and based their calculations on that understanding, called paramanu, where:

2 Paramanus = 1 Anu

3 Anu = 1 Trasarenu

3 Trasarenus = 1 Truti

100 Trutis = 1 Vedha

3 Vedha = 1 Lava

3 Lavas = 1 Nimesha (the twinkling of an eye)

3 Nimesha = 1 Ksana (moment)

5 Ksana = 1 Kastha

15 Kastha = 1 Laghu

15 Laghus = 1 Nadika

2 Nadika = 1 Muhurta

6 or 7 Nadika (depending on length or day or night) = 1 Prahara (1/4 of a day or night)

1 Day = 4 Yamas (6 hour period)

15 Days = 1 Fortnight (alternating between bright and dark period)

2 Months = 1 Ritu

6 Months = 1 Ayana (southerly & northern)

2 Ayanas = 1 day/night of demi-gods

 

Arya micro-timescale against modern time scale, is as follows:

1 paramanu = 60750th of a second

1 truti = 29.6296 microseconds

1 tatpara = 2.96296 milliseconds

1 nimesha = 88.889 milliseconds

45 nimesha (1 prana) = 4 seconds

6 prana (1 vinadi) = 24 seconds

60 vinadis (1 nadi) = 24 minutes

60 nadis (1 ahoratra) = 1 day

According to Arya sun time:

100 truti (atom) = 1 tatpara

30 tatpara = 1 nimesha (twinkling)

18 nimesha = 1 kashtha (bit)

30 kashtha = 1 kala (minute)

30 kala = 1 ghatika (1/2 hour)

2 ghatika = 1 muhurta (hour)

30 muhurta = 1 ahoratra (day)

 

Arya astronomical texts are divided time into two categories:

Murttakalah – manifest time or organic time

Amurtakalah – unmanifested time or mechanical time

 

Arya astronomer Varaha Mihira divided a day/night into 24 Horas (Greek ‘Ora’; Latin ‘Hora’; English ‘Hour’). From this is derived the 24 hour system. This was a change from earlier Arya astronomers divisions of day/night into 60 ghatikas.

The moon was used as the basis for the calculation of the fortnight and the month. The solar month entered calculations much later.

 

Samvatsara cycle:

Means a year. 60 samvatsara rotate in cyclical order, divided into three sections of 20 samvatsaras each. The 1st is Brahma, the 2nd is Vishnu, and the 3rd is Shiva.

 

All of this only comes into its own when we begin to rationalise the puzzle of incidents written in the Arya classics of Ramayan (life exploits of Lord Rama) and the Mahabharata (life exploits of Lord Krishna) into our current timescale. Lord Krishna’s time can be placed 70-100 millions years ago. Lord Rama’s period goes further back, aligning with the destruction of the planet which now litters (the asteroid belt) the space between Mars and Jupiter. It was during this time that Earth’s original moon was destroyed, and to stabilize our portion of the solar system an artificial moon was ‘brought’, manoeuvered, and set into motion around Earth. It is this ‘moon’ we see in the sky. It has secrets, slowly unravelling as humanity comes to terms with esoteric phenomena, albeit it has a sub-strata of three-dimensional Beings living there also – a technical civilisation vastly advanced than our own.

During a recent inter-galactic war, Mars had its protective atmospheric zone vaporized. Granted, it was badly depleted by the un-repentant extraction of its mineral and natural resources by humans, as currently happening here on earth. Also worth noting in addition is that Mars had a full set of oceans, lakes, rivers and fresh water; Earth in reality was a second, substitute home, and furthermore, up to that point ‘earthlings’ also resided on one other sphere within this solar system.

This latest inter-galactic war was a very recent event in the scheme of things. It remains fresh in the unconscious psyche of all non race-Europeans. It is this awareness that my seniors are very mindful of. However, a lower order shared with the Europeans the art of gunpowder, and weapons that could be used for destructive means. Later, a similar lower order gave details of projectiles, and their powering mechanisms to the German Max Muller when he visited old India. Thankfully, European mind thus far has only understood the very basic elements of the powering mechanism. This in-depth critical information was used to develop the V2 rocket by the Germans, a weapon of war during the European war (1938-1945), and is the bedrock of current space travel, of which the cruise missile is the latest ‘avatar’.

A short while back, another lower order was advising a European power on the development of a mechanism, with fuel system, and fundamental stablising factors, that would make the atomic weapon a redundant system; and that would allow travel to the nearest star system in about a couple of hours. The higher order, and I as one who had earned access to the debate, spoke out vehemently against sharing any further information with race-Europeans as they would only use it to subjugate other races; and far worse, they would start a fight with other Beings in our solar system and beyond, resulting in a war that would seal the final destruction of Earth. The exchange of information was duly stopped, and an agreement reached between Chen (Zen) and Indian mystics to stop all such exchanges until humanity has sufficiently evolved to a point where each human cares for their fellow human, the planet, and its resources and other dwellers.

Current technology is so utterly backwards that it can be classified as ‘primate weaponry’. Technically bereft, the current thinking (aka European consciousness) is limited to mechanical thinking. Asian thinking by comparison automatically includes the psychic dimension. Aboriginal thinking is pure and sublime, and is the only thought paradigm that has the capacity to fathom creation and its layered dimensional presence. Indian thought paradigm understands the concept of creation based on the organic timescale, but does not hold the key to unravelling its secrets.

The (Indian) organic timescale differs hugely from the European mechanical system. The contradictory mathematics and rules of physics have to be understood at a psychic level, and that is where meditation comes into its own. Meditation, where thought is held in poise, has to become the normal function; and it is only then that complex, hitherto incomprehensible, maths and laws of physics will allow further venture into creation. At the current juncture, humans can only travel a universe as a concept of an analytical thought-sphere, and even then mechanical technology, with Indian assistance and leadership, will limit travel along a single plane trajectory. It is only when humans appreciate the excellence of African, and thereafter Aboriginal, thinking that they will appreciate multi-layered dimensional life form and existence.

Yet, this very reality can also be experienced by merging into permanent meditation, which allows entry into samadhi. It is samadhi that is the opening portal, facilitating factual recognition of the multi-dimensional cosmos.

It is there that humans will engage with demi-gods, and gods…on a permanent basis.

Reverting…

The English copied the German (1938-1945) practice of beginning a day at midnight for purposes of industrial manufacture. Thus began the idiotic ‘day begins at midnight’ nonsense. It has remained in force ever since.

Now that England has exercised Brexit will it, I wonder, drop the German clock time, or retain the German war-time timescale?

Oh, the luxurious stupidity of ignorance…

Interestingly, it was I who re-introduced the phrase ‘ignorance is bliss’, which was then used in the first part of The Matrix film trilogy. This came about because His Holiness in whose tutelage I was placed during my early teens had input into the making of The Matrix. We were watching the much-flaunted modern Bollywood version of the Mahabharata televised on BBC. We looked at each other and felt utter shame at the amateur depiction and rendition of the Indian classic. Interestingly, several of my tongue-in-cheek quotes had already been used regularly in Bollywood by this time. This happened because His Holiness has direct access to directors and actors from Bollywood. Thereafter, his access to Hollywood directors and actors and the making of The Matrix was a foregone conclusion. The Matrix is our rendition of Mahabharata, and its dialogue of how we explain the esoteric in common parlance.

Reverting…

During samadhi, time changes. It is an event-based system, and time has no meaning there per se. As an event-based system, samadhi doesn’t measure the passing of time. Here on Earth, although time sequence is organic, it is circumstantial. This means you can suffer, remain unaffected, or benefit from a situation. By contrast, in samadhi, events take shape and dissolve, but your circumstances remain unaffected. This is because mechanical time becomes dysfunctional and irrelevant. In samadhi, events surpass 360 degrees… a concept humans understand. 360 degrees is a three-dimensional concept, and limits our understanding of how space obscures, or indeed becomes an obstacle, unless one is advanced in samadhi; and only then it is possible to appreciate the limitation of 360 degree conceptual existence.

For example, space as you see and experience it is the very veil that obscures or hides advanced existence. During meditation, and with guidance on how to remain in samadhi, the space-veil disintegrates, or opens up, allowing experience of multi-dimensional existence. The human brain is incapable of fathoming this reality. After all, death experience is not brain-based; that experience is beyond thought-limitations also. Samadhi is not brain or thought based. One has to accept that several bodies co-exist and surround the physical entity. It is one of them that allows consciousness to experience advanced layers of existence.

It is in that advanced state that one meets demi-gods and then gods. Beyond that state lies a platform, an accepted state that is the domain of an Earth personality named Guru Nanakdevji, who re-established Sikhism…for the umpteenth time. It is Guru Nanakdevji who categorically states in his writing in Guru Granthsahibji that Akaal is an environment contained within yet another environment. Human three-dimensional consciousnesses is unable to understand that reality.

Note: I know this only because under tutelage I attained the pedestal of grace. It is that grace which allows me access to and understanding of certain matters. It is a privilege. And I am the first to say that I do not accept that I have the right to experience the higher states by my own volition. That environment is utterly complex, contradictory, and confusing. It is where, unless guided, one falls victim to the advanced ‘divine’ lure of the limited existence (that’s the devil).

And each of you who think that as a Sikh you need no one to teach, guide and show you the passage and its pitfalls, are ignorant and peddling utter nonsense. My dear Sikhs, advanced awakening is not the same as self-teaching masturbation. This is a very serious awakening and can only be accessed through humble service by not expecting anything in return. The person you are in servitude to is a person who is ultimate in experience and has personal accreditation to enter advanced states.

You must remain humble. If the person to whom you are attached is of a lower order do not fret; as your servitude and humbleness are recognised. Eventually, a guide, a mentor, a sublime light-Being will be assigned to you. That person will find you. An automatic, seamless relationship will evolve. However, that person will have to decide if he is willing to make you his ‘ang’. Ang means one’s own. One’s person. One’s self with itself. Where two become one. For reasons I have never fathomed, I attained that privilege. And it is that privilege that I function through, deciphering facts from assumptions.

For example, commentators regale how the gods are human in form and attitude, and their progeny even more so. In my autobiography, now in the process of coming into publication, I explain how and why that is not the case.

I will leave you with this thought. Look into the night sky. You see a lot of space. In advanced samadhi this very sector of our galaxy is empty space. We do not exist. Now conjecture and contemplate as you look at the night sky, and you see space.

Genesis of Khalsa

It is a noble culture, as well as an intellectual utopia to build on the unseen, that intangible consciousness-architecture where showmanship is put aside and one faces the odds with confusion, chaos, complications, and contradictions while attempting to unravel the unfathomable.

Let’s start unraveling…

A cosmic-psyche has a tangible presence. That presence is consciousness. There is a separate consciousness template for each species. Any given consciousness is the lower manifestation of its governing cosmic-psyche. And each cosmic-psyche has a specific role to fulfill in creation.

The consciousness of a particular cosmic-psyche fulfills the requirements of the noble culture mentioned in the opening paragraph. Globally, we call the material manifestation of that consciousness Sikhism.

In this essay, I intend to share knowledge about Sikhism which Sikhs themselves have difficulty grasping and explaining. Events central to Sikhism fly in the face of widespread assumption that it does not give credence to mystical happenings and manifestations called forth by individuals. In fact, as I will go on to show, Sikhism has at times pivoted on mystical incidents expressly engineered by several of the ten Gurus.

One such example, which I have been writing about for almost forty years, centre on the events at Anandpur Sahib in 1699.

Various political and ruling factions have been able to hide evidence relating to this event that was once openly available, including the suppression of eye-witness accounts from the time, which the old-fashioned Sufi could still share if they wished.

The tenth Guruji was tasked with delivering a dutiful and responsible race that would provide global protection, and keep the Light of Balance from going out. So, at the end of March 1699, he invited Sikhs to a meeting at Anandpur Sahib.

What transpired at the meeting was shocking. To this day, Sikhs are unable to explain it, unable to reconcile in their minds what happened with what they think possible in the world. They have therefore conjured up lies and created a mytho-logical account of the event which presents the tenth Guruji as a trickster and a showman, a mere stage performer – all of which traits are antithetical to the very essence of Guruship.

The story goes that Guruji asked for Sikhs to step up who would be willing to give up their heads for the Guruji; that he whisked them away one-by-one out of sight of the congregation, and that he reappeared each time with blood dripping from his kirpan, asking for the next Sikh to pledge himself. The moral of the story is much like that which Kahlil Gibran writes about love, namely, to follow the Guru, lay oneself at his feet, though his ways may be incomprehensible. A similar interpretation is found in the Jewish Torah regarding Abraham’s sacrifice of his son.

Here is what actually happened in March 1699 at Anandpur Sahib….

On a stage and immersed in a deep, practical-samadhi, the tenth Guruji asked for a Sikh who would be willing to give up his head for his Guruji. A Sikh came forward, offering himself humbly. He walked on to the stage, and was directed to kneel down and bow his head execution-style, and with one swift move of Guruji’s sword he was decapitated. His body slumped, his head rolled around, blood spewed everywhere.

Guruji asked for another Sikh to step forward. Another decapitation followed.

In total, five Sikhs were decapitated on the stage at Anandpur Sahib that day.

Afterwards, Guruji moved towards a large metal bowl containing fresh water and recited invocation prayers. During his recitation, Guriji asked his second wife (he had three wives, and two of them bore him his four sons known as the Chaar Sahibzaade) if she had anything she wished to input. Accepting the invitation, Guruji’s wife added dried pure sugar to the water.

The fact of being a Guruji, and the creation-authority conferred upon such beings, combined to transform the sugar-water from simply being an object to having agency. This agency manifested in its authority over Death to stay the execution of the individual until their duty-responsibility has been fulfilled.

Guruji then knelt on the stage, and fused a head with the body lying nearest to it – not the body from which it had been originally parted. He administered the sugar-water – the material object infused now with life-giving agency – to the newly reconfigured body. The dead Sikh gained consciousness and recovered from his ordeal. He was now Pure, born of neither blood nor flesh. He was now Khalsa.

The procedure was repeated five times in total. When all had recovered, they were escorted off stage to wash and change their clothing. The five earlier decapitated, now reconfigured and breathing Sikhs, reappeared on stage in the now famous saffron attire of the Panj Piyare (the five Pure ones), wearing the five Ks of Khalsa.

[Note: please scroll down to the end of this essay for definitions of the five Ks and other terms, such as Guru, Sikh, Singh, Kaur, Khalsa]

Now came the turn of Guruji, Guru Gobind Rai, to kneel before the Panj Piyare and ask if they deemed him worthy to receive the sanctified authority of the sugar-water. They in response asked him what he would be willing to sacrifice. He agreed to four sacrifices; but these were deemed to be insufficient. It was only upon the offer of the fifth sacrifice that Guruji was administered the sugar-water by the Panj Piyare. And only then was he, like the Panj Piyare, accorded the name assigned to those bearing duty-responsibility: Singh. Guru Gobind Rai thus became Guru Gobind Singhji.

Whereupon, the sugar-water was renamed Amrit, its agency in conferring duty-responsibility to those consume it confirmed and thus sanctified. This means that whosoever takes Amrit is embarked upon the journey of becoming and thus fulfilling the role of a global protector. This was not understood by the masses gathered at Anandpur Sahib that day in 1699. Indeed, many thousands of men and women took Amrit that day, but they did so in the belief that it was an elixir and would liberate them. They did not fully comprehend the duty-responsibility which consuming Amrit would imbue them with over time.

The events at Anandpur Sahib that day in late March 1699 spread like wildfire.

The birth of the Khalsa, its foundation in life-revival – which as the facts related above illustrate was not strictly or only the case, though it was a significant part – spread fear in the minds of India’s Moslems.

Sikhs publicly abhor (white/black) witchcraft, and indeed any type of psychic ESP environment and practice. However, Sikhism has at various crucial moments pivoted on the psychic manipulation of matter, bending the rudimentary rules of creation applicable on this planet.

Islam on the other hand is rooted in awe of psychic machination, and values ESP more than divinity. It hones in on and beseeches psychic intervention, deeming it godly, Allah. However, Islam relies on anger mismanagement and ego-laced arrogance, and its adherents justify their actions as scriptural. But it must be remembered that the Koran mimics and mirrors the Torah, which in turn is not scriptural but is a set of guidelines which its own adherents regularly discuss and debate.

In order to counter the absolute value that Islam places on the psychic, over and above divinity, the Gurujis at critical moments employed the very principle of psychic environments to make a point. However, they never used the facility to protect themselves or cheat death, even though they had dominion over death. However, this changed, to a degree, as a consequence of the events that took place at Anandpur Sahib on the new moon in the last week of the month of March, now celebrated on the 13th or 14th of April.

Despite their fear, the Moslems were in awe of the Khalsa. And in war, when they were sure of death, they would seek out a Khalsa, to die at their hands. They did so in recollection of the indication by their Prophet of a coming race which he referred to as angels. These were the Khalsa.

Incidentally, I had the opportunity once of sharing these facts with a Japanese world war two veteran. He told me:

“We feared the Gurkha of course, but it was the Sikhs who evaded death time and again. We could never understand how at the very last moment a Sikh would evade death until, once his duty was accomplished, he could be killed. We put it down to kismet, luck, something like that; but we also viewed and accepted it as a form of zen shogun.”

Hazrat Mohammad, the prophet, the originator of the more fanatical version of the Hebrew faith, now called Islam, stated that a warrior-honest race will evolve to root out evil and protect goodness. He said, they will keep untrimmed beards, and untrimmed hair. Unlike seers, however, they will comb their hair not backwards but by bending forward at the torso and combing from the back of the head towards the forehead. They will be known for their honesty and truthful lifestyle. They will be seers from an arena above divinity, and they will have the consciousness termed duty-responsibility to protect them as and when needed. (Note – death itself is answerable to duty-responsibility, as the events of Anandpur Sahib described above testify to). They will suffer for their responsibility, a responsibility exercised for the greater good of the masses. and holding a grudge will not be in their makeup.

Old Islam resembles the Europe of today. We see Europe on its way to becoming an Islamic caliphate, choosing to wage endless and traumatic war upon the people of the Middle East, while supposedly showing their compassion by allowing the refugees it creates through such war to settle in Europe. Old Islam – or Mohammedism as it was then known – carried out a similar unceasing war on Aryadesh (now called India). The brutality re-invoked and re-established a protector race that in previous times had occupied the landmass of Europe (all but forgotten now except for the language influences it left behind). That protector race with its ideology of graciousness has, in current times, as in the olden times of its existence, come to be called Sikh.

Guys, the Sikh as a people have not yet delivered on their duty and responsibility. In times to come, when humanity faces certain extinction, the Sikhs will stand alongside others to defend against this but it will be the Sikhs’ contribution that will be the linchpin, that will allow humanity to survive.

People from three other races also hold this cardinal knowledge. Those races live in lands conquered and occupied by Europeans. For the safety of humanity, governance of those lands must revert back to the indigenous races. After that happens, it will take seven to ten generations for their psyche to realign with their past identity and knowledge, and they will be ready to share the Sikhs’ global responsibility and avert this planet from being wiped out. Only a release from the bondage of the present will provide the essential elements for the Sikhs, and then the Khalsa, to manifest a mechanism for our survival.

You cannot all become Sikh, let alone become Khalsa.

Meditation leads to samadhi.

Samadhi leads to practical-samadhi.

But none of this progression is possible without grace.

And grace? Well, it has to be earned.

To earn grace, you have to throw yourself upon the mercy of a Sadhu. You relinquish your life to a Sadhu at each birth. They may be vile, arrogant, whatever; but you must not judge them. An unseen authority will notice your sacrifice; and will send a divine mentor to teach, guide, and honour you with grace. The obstacles are unbelievable. You are set to fail. But it is not the passing or the failing that counts. The telling point is humbleness. Truth will only take you so far. It will not set you free. Humbleness will set you free.

The journey begins with humbleness.

Avtar

…………………….

Here are deeper definitions of Guru, Sikh, Khalsa, and the meaning of the five Ks.

GURU:

First, it ought to be clear from the fore-going depiction of events at Anandpur Sahib in 1699, and of Guruji’s actions there, that a Guru is not a teacher or an enlightener. It is an insult to Sikhs and to India more generally to apply such secularist descriptions to any guru, though these people and many others besides are daft enough to use the title – in its ridiculously false definition – and hope that the person thus conferred the name of guru will deliver them from the cycle of life and death… but as you may have guessed, there’s no chance of that actually happening.

What is more, secular people who refer to each other as guru inadvertently establish an ongoing bond with them whereby the one on the pedestal is obliged to drag the other into the unfathomable. Sounds good, right? But what it really means is that both are tied into to a contract where whenever one of them fails and falls down the selection-progression ladder – from human to animal or insect – the other will accompany them down there.

Call another a guru or jockey yourself into a position to be called a guru, and both of you will seriously inhibit your progress towards being free from the bondage of life and death …so, do not call another person a guru, and do not allow yourself be tagged guru either, is my advice here.

Having clarified what a Guru is not, let’s clarify what it is. Guru is an entity by whose intervention they who are at the apex of divinity attain moksha, albeit the lower level thereof. Guru at this junction is unseen, a sense-teaching entity, beyond the sound-light conundrum. One cannot meditate into moksha, as one can with divinity; one accesses and advances into moksha by invitation, or more usually by recommendation (what we otherwise call grace), hence the need for an intervening entity – the Guruji.

SIK-KH:

Sikkh is the actual and correct spelling for a Sikh when written in English. However, I will use the spelling Sikh for ease of comprehension.

Sikh is an analyser, scrutiniser and improver of every aspect of life, from the secular to the divine…yet they remain humble throughout.

Sikh, despite all the things you may have heard it described as, also refers to a realm above that of the divine. One of the tests of divinity is to be born and live one’s life in a secular household environment. The divine undergoing secular tests are currently born into Sikh households. Sure, divinity can be attained by the recluse – often thought of as the ultimate detached individual – but the more difficult test to be mastered is that of maintaining one’s stature and status while navigating the quotidian and mundane everyday tasks of the householder. Those of my position have seen many a person’s hard-won divinity unravel in such trying circumstances. It is not easy.

SINGH/KAUR:

Singhs and Kaurs are those who have chosen to practice a Sikh lifestyle in conjunction with the secular environment, and who do so without flinching from the challenges the secular may impose on their Sikh way of life. It is the ultimate test of detachment. Singh denotes male-energy; Kaur denotes female-energy (energy – shakti). Shakti itself has many layered definitions. As of course do Singh and Kaur.

KHALSA:

What about Khalsa? Well, it is not a name or label given to baptised Sikhs, as is universally thought. You cannot baptise the baptised. Rather, the consumption of Amrit, symbolic authority made material, confers upon the Sikh a duty-responsibility – which manifests in their new identification as Khalsa – which might more appropriately be thought of less as baptism than investiture. Baptism, insofar as it relates to Sikhism, refers for its part to the attunement of a being with Sikhism which then readies them for birth as a Sikh. Though it ought to be remembered (and this contradicts the previous statement to some degree), that being born into a Sikh family does not automatically indicate one’s attainment of Sikhism; though for the most part, being part of a practising Sikh household is a step in one’s progress towards awakening.

The Five Ks of Sikhism

Note: each of the following has multi-layered, more expansive, and deeper connotations and significances than those offered below. But the following will give you a basic initial insight into the five Ks of Sikhism.

KESH:

Tangled hair symbolises the emotional tangles of the mind that hinder one’s divine progress. The hair is detangled by the act of bending one’s head forward and combing the hair from that position, and thus symbolises the reminder to detangle the mind and it emotions. The movement of bending forward also lowers one’s head, and thus constitutes an act of humbleness too. Only detached humbleness untangles emotional entrapments.

KANGA:

The comb the Sikh wears in their hair. The teeth of the kanga signify, and remind one to use the mind’s thoughts to excavate for deeper and refined awareness from within one’s own antrkarna (soul) using the Atma. The Atma, as I have stated elsewhere and numerous times, is not the equivalent of the soul. The soul is the harmonised cooperation of the body’s internal organs to clear obstacles and allow for ever-increasing awareness, taking one from the lower disciplines of religion, rite-ritual, spirituality, and dharma into divinity and onwards into Sikhism.

KARRA:

The steel bangle, as it is universally referred to, the karra signifies deflecting the emotionality that hinders divine clarification. Once again, one uses humbleness to format a path from one to the other.

KIRPAAN:

The kirpaan has dual symbolism: forgiveness at the point of killing one’s foe, and the cutting edge of refined thought that is the basis from which one progresses into divine awareness.

KACHHA:

This signifies the refined, discriminating, and tranquil expression of all sexual emotions, that lead into higher realms of divinity.

Holi (festival of colour)

On the full moon of the last month of the Indian year (Phalgun – Feb/Mar), a special festival is celebrated.

I first experienced Holi in Panjab, after we had left Kenya during the Mau Mau uprising, and it was eye-opening.

I already knew the three main stories associated with the event. Inter-connected, they stemmed from the Arya tradition, morphed into Vedic tradition, aspects of which were then debunked in Sikh tradition, until they came to be made synonymous with Hindu tradition. The version of the story which one celebrates at Holi is usually chosen after a quick period of introspection as to which story resonates the most.

Story #1

An arrogant and obnoxious king of Multan, Panjab, considered himself the perfect human being – a god whom his subjects ought to worship. This king’s son, Hiranyakashipu (Hira, for short – which in its diminutive means ‘gem’), however, worshipped not his father but Lord Vishnu. When debate, dictates and threats proved useless in swaying the child to do his father’s bidding, the king employed a nursemaid to smear her breasts with poison before suckling the child. The nursemaid died from poisoning; Hira lived. Exasperated, the king then ordered his son to sit in his aunt’s lap – she who, following a prolonged period of penance had been granted the ability to withstand fire – and she would then sit on a pyre with the child in her lap. The son acceded to his father’s demand – his aunt was burned alive; Hira emerged unscathed.

Seldom making its way into this version of the Holi story is that Hira, Lord Vishnu’s worshipper, covered himself in an array of earth elements of various colours, and thus protected himself from the fire. The inclusion of such a critical aspect of the story would have been deeply problematic to a an Arya culture grown increasingly impotent in terms of its capacity for analytical understanding and instead pinning all its hopes on divine intervention. If Hira saved himself, whither the miracle of God’s intervention and grace!

Sikhs have taken up the baton of analytical understanding and insight discarded and lost by the Arya. Indeed, according to their dharma (i.e., Sikhism) there is no divine intervention. Psyche and divinity are logical aspects of creation, albeit at a rarified super-conscious level; though of course, they must get their hands dirty, so to speak.

Accordingly, Holi is celebrated as the victory of good over evil in the form of Hira smearing himself with the colours of the earth. No divine intervention in sight!

Story #2

As a child, Krishna’s skin pigment was deep purple. In fact, he was so deeply and darkly purple as to resemble people from Africa. You can conclude, therefore, what his origins were; I have an open mind about such things, but Hindu India is certainly not ready for such facts. Anyway, Krishna was besotted with Radha. She was fair. He was dark, very very dark, purplish-black indeed, on top of which he had all the usual boyish complexes. Following his mother’s advice, Krishna the child smeared Radha – who up until then had dismissed his approaches – with earth colours. Their differences thus muted, the children played together happily and went on to become the great lovers of Vedic Indian lore.

Story #3

Lord Shiva, a very boring guy should you happen to meet him since he is always meditating, is portrayed as moody, unapproachable and intolerant of mischief and petty conversation. You can decide for yourselves whether that makes him a social outcast or a god, though for my part I respect this configuration of his personality. Anyway, one day an upwardly mobile, divinely-steeped person decided to test Lord Shiva’s meditative focus. Assuming the form of an irresistible damsel, the changeling began dancing in front of Lord Shiva. Where others would have been fooled, Lord Shiva was not. The changeling was burned to ash with one look from Lord Shiva’s third eye, who then gave him back life. Thus, during Holi, ash is smeared on the forehead by the devout to represent the death and the revival of the changeling. Over time, earth colours were introduced too – suggesting some symbiosis of the various Holi stories.

Sikh analysis

Now let’s imbue proceedings with some Sikh analytical thought and insight. For this, I need to revisit my childhood.

As I said earlier, my first Holi celebration took place in Panjab after we had moved there from Kenya. In the days leading up to the event, all the local kids raced around borrowing each other’s possessions as if it were their right to do so (we would now call this thieving). We gathered together things we had thus ‘borrowed’, including from our own mothers’ kitchens, after school and raced to the local playground – basically, a large area of dry and barren earth, around which housing was erected, and which we used for playing gulli-danda, kick-about and, above all, cricket.

Escaping the clutches of mothers and sisters, as we ran we held close our booty of turmeric, neem, dhak, kumkum, powdered red sandalwood, dried flowers, radishes, pomegranates, mehndi, gram flour, vibrant and deep coloured fruits and vegetables such as berries, grapes and beetroot, dried tea leaves and charcoal… and of course most important of all, water.

No single household had all these items, so we each gathered what we could find, and brought them to the playground where the older boys organised for us to take turns grinding everything into a paste using a pestle and mortar – basically a larger flat stone and a smaller more rounded stone. We would then leave the paste out to dry in the sun.

Each group of lads would end up with a fair amount of dry powder at the end of this activity. Three days before the last full moon of the year, younger kids like me were assigned to collect firewood from around the local area. As darkness fell and the full moon appeared on the horizon, we lit a fire to commemorate the symbolic burning of the young boy Hira.

The next day, the fun began. We dispersed our dry powder in large metal buckets filled three quarters of the way up with water. We filled our bicycle pumps, appropriately sealed to prevent leakage, with the colourful solution… and then it was a case of let them have it! No one was spared, as we sprayed all around us with colour, and everyone was a happy smiling target – old and young. Those of us who didn’t have bicycles yet, filled up glass Coca-Cola and Fanta bottles and shook them around. It was playful war.

Misunderstanding the rules, I would often forget the playful aspect in favour of the war aspect, thinking it was my mission to remain as dry as possible while soaking as many other people with colour as possible. One lad too umbrage at this misunderstanding of mine and came after me, glass bottle against glass bottle. The inevitable happened, the necks of the glass bottles broke, and I was slashed deep at the wrist just above the bone, while he was similarly if also less deeply cut. A gaping bloody wound opened up just centimetres from a huge vein that snakes its way around the wrist bone, and was duly wrapped in cloth. Instinctively, I submerged my hand and wrist into one of the buckets of colourful water, and then an elder yanked it out of the water and smeared it with some of the powder we had ground days earlier. I got an earful that day, and I still bear the scar to this day – but damn it was fun!

Looking back at the event now, I can apply some rational thinking to what went on.

The season is turning; bio-systems are undergoing a physical cleanse to release them from the rigours of winter; and the cold virus abounds. Cures and cleanses are sought in homeopathic medicines whose ingredients are earthbound. The beginning of springtime is thus the moment in which we boost our immune systems.

All of this activity is of course stepped in rite and ritual – but its effects are tangible and embodied.

In communities that celebrate Holi using traditional earth ingredients, none of the eye, skin, or inflation problems suffered by city dwellers are experienced; and rates of influenza are lower, as is their severity. In urban areas, by contrast, the use of industrial synthetic colours entails eye irritations requiring hospital intervention, severe skin problems requiring manufactured medicine, and seriously debilitating bouts of flu.

If I were you, I’d make my way to India – off the beaten track there are places where Holi celebrations last a month. Tell them Avtar sent you!

As for the story of Holi that resonates with me? Well, I prefer to conceptualise the event as a turning point away from old grudges, feuds and animosities; and towards the renewal of friendships and reinforcement of existing ties.

The new organic year has kicked off and has brought with it spring and new life.

Happy Holi!

Now, go bury the hatchet…

Spring festivals, Sacrifice, Cannibalism & Sikhism’s New Year

Part I

End of one organic cycle: beginning of another.

This year’s vernal equinox falls on 20th March in the northern hemisphere. Amongst some cultures, this passage of time is celebrated according to tenets opposed to modernism and to modern perspectives. Isolationism couples itself with celebration of glories past. Subjective theorizing, loose philosophy, and a particular cultural moral compass on sexuality, combine to give us brain-drained commonsense, which clings to the cleverness of days long gone, unremarkable now but for the romanticised folkloric memories passed down the generations.

Spring:

Pagans celebrate Ostara, performing rites and rituals in honour of fertility and regeneration, symbolised by the goddess Eostre (a Germanic word meaning east), who represents young women, fresh light, and the budding of trees and flowers.

Fertility and regeneration are celebrated by the gifting of brightly painted eggs, themselves embodiments of fertility and renewal, as are hares (which have symbolic connection to the moon).

Easter:

Historians and liberal theologians believe death and resurrection was initially, in Caucasian consciousness, associated with Attis – a Phrygian (an area now in Turkey) and god of vegetation. In his self-mutilation, death, and resurrection Attis represents the fruits of the earth, which die in winter and rise again in spring. His cult began around 1250BC. The incidents attributed to him were grafted onto stories of Jesus’ life to make Christian theology more acceptable regionally. Elsewhere, other theologians indicate that Jesus’ life events as they appear in the gospels are lifted straight from the life of Krishna.

Easter celebrates Jesus’ resurrection. It occurs at the end of Lenten (‘lengthening of days’), which lasts 46 days from Ash Wednesday (falling on 10th February this year) until Easter Sunday (27th March this year). Tradition counts this as 40 days, and excludes for various reasons Saturdays and Sundays.

The Thursday before Easter is Holy Thursday and commemorates Jesus’ Last Supper. The Friday before Easter is Good Friday, and it commemorates the anniversary of Jesus’ crucifixion. The Saturday before Easter is Holy Saturday, a remembrance of Jesus’ entombment.

The Easter period represents two opposing worlds co-existing – darkness, sin and death on the one hand and resurrection, restoration of light, and spring on the other. The evening vigil between Good Friday and Easter day symbolizes the end of the first and the beginning of the second.

Currently, Easter Sunday* is one of the Christian calendar’s two holiest days. This is the result of public pressure forcing the western church to institutionalize the observance of Easter, despite early Christians not having observed it at all.

*(Sunday is named after the Scandinavian sun goddess Sunna. Sunna, interestingly, is a Sanskrit word used by Buddhaji as well as by Vedic and eastern philosophy. It refers to a state above stillness, quietness and nothingness.)

Around 325AD, Emperor Constantine ordered Easter to be celebrated on the first full moon of Spring, which occurs between 21st March and 25th April. It is noteworthy that the current biblical story of Jesus’ crucifixion took formal root in the western church as a result of Emperor Constantine’s collusion.

The eastern church, by contrast, echoes Jesus’ own observance of the earlier tradition of Passover. It ought to be noted that at no time did Jesus renounce his Jewish religion. Nor did he insist on a new religion. He simply reintroduced clarity, and de-cluttered confusion. This year, Passover begins on Friday 22nd April and ends on Saturday 30th April.

Part II

Cannibalism

Numerous stories in Greek mythology involve cannibalism, but only between close family members. It was practiced to maintain purity and specialness and mirrored the Egyptian Pharaohic practice of incest, which aimed to retain the purity to the royal lineage bestowed by the gods.

Not too dissimilar to the Islamic practice of marrying within the family pool, cannibalism and Egyptian royal incest associated purity with, and emerged from, as well as being bounded, by kinship.

Privilege, prestige and oneness were the core precepts of cannibal practice originally, before it became widespread globally.

In Gough’s Cave, England, there is evidence of communal cannibalism practiced around 15000 years ago. In fact, evidence exists that cannibalism was actually still practiced around 2000 years ago in Great Britain, and across Europe during various periods, until recent times.

In World War II, there was reported cannibalism at the siege of Leningrad, among Soviet POWs dying in Nazi camps due to extreme starvation, and also among German troops when they were besieged in Stalingrad as well as when they were later transferred to prison camps in Siberia.

In India, the Aghoris (Indian ascetics), consume human flesh that’s been cooked on the funeral pyre, after the family of the deceased has left. They believe the flesh provides spiritual benefits, and they claim that it tastes like chicken.

In the USA, in 1931, New York reporter William Buehler Seabrook secured a chunk of human meat from the body of a healthy person killed in an accident, from a hospital intern, and he cooked and ate it. He reported, “It was like good, fully developed veal, not young, but not yet beef. It was so nearly good, fully developed veal, that I think no person with a palate of ordinary, normal sensitiveness could distinguish it from veal, and cannot be mistaken for goat, high game, or pork.”

In his book The Gulag Archipelago, Alexandra Solzhenitsyn describes cannibalism in 20th century USSR, where children, dead by famine, were eaten by their parents.

When the Uruguayan Air Force Flight 571 crashed in the Andes on 13th October 1972, the survivors resorted to eating the deceased during their 72 days in the mountains.

In England, on 23rd July 1988, Rick Gibson ate human flesh in public, in Walthamstow, London. The country does not have a specific law against cannibalism. He did so again on 15th April 1989, in Lewisham High Street, London. When Gibson attempted to eat human meat in Vancouver on 14th July 1989 the Canadian police confiscated his meal. However charges were dropped, and he went on to eat another piece of human flesh on the steps of the Vancouver court house on 22nd September 1989.

Part III

Cannibalism, Spring Festivals and Sikh New Year

Paganism has an unbelievable amount of words, rites and rituals that overlap with Vedic Brahmanism, as indeed do many of the Voodoo rites and rituals practiced globally. Brahmanism, briefly, denotes living in harmony with nature and venerating the organic template. It believes the egg has a special symbolic meaning, hence an old Pagan ritual of ‘sacrificing’ an egg by placing it under the foundations of new buildings for protection, well-being, and progression.

Nowadays, during Pagan and Christian spring festivals eggs are coloured brightly, the brightness communicating renewal, freshness, fertility, and the propagation of spices (which also represent fertility).

The Latin proverb “Omne vivum ex ovo”, meaning “All life comes from an egg” coincides perfectly with pure knowledge, the Vadantic scriptures, and the most modern de-mystified writing that exists today referred to and addressed as Sikhism’s living Guru. These all acknowledge that the whole universe was created from an egg. Creation, in Sikhism, is in fact repeatedly called an egg.

The egg thus continues to circulate today as a meaningful emblem of life and as an allegory for rebirth.

Sacrifice, nowadays, takes the form of a nominal food offering, a monetary donation to a religious or dharmic organisation, or to a charity, or else seva (selfless service for the benefit of another).

The sacrificial practice continues to be led by the elder male of a family group. The sanctity of the occasion is duly observed with reverent introspection, and a silent expression of gratitude that one is capable of offering the gift or service in the first place. It is interesting how without any external prompt humbleness automatically surfaces during the sacrifice.

We now live in a cycle of negative Shiva, as opposed to a cycle of positive Shiva. This represents transmutation, negative technology, self-interest presiding over charity, and the search for self-realisation. Thus, the charity of this cycle is the sacrifice of money, and/or giving away articles and items of wealth.

Charity was also practiced during the negative cycle of Brahma. That period witnessed the beginning of the hallowed activity of sacred sacrifice of a living Being. Initially, the living Being was ordinary grain. Then it was fruit and eggs. Later, the sacrifice was elevated to one’s personal possessions, a sacrifice of personal wealth; hence the beginning of animal sacrifice. It began with small domesticated farm animals including the hare, until people’s grandiose egos pushed them to sacrifice ever larger animals. Then the (now) unacceptable happened. For numerous emotional and/or seasonal reasons, the sacrifice became human, moving from infants to adult females and adult males. However, the most potent sacrifice was deemed to be the sacrifice of young females.

Sacrifice, right from the beginning, involved conscious acknowledgement that the gift became sanctified through the act of sacrifice, that it was blessed and imbued with grace. Once sanctified, the offering was shared among attendees, so that they might be blessed by consuming the sanctified object – first grains, then eggs, then animals, and eventually humans. But human flesh consumption was limited in the Brahma period to the royals and the high priests.

This practice changed, as the governing thought-energy changed. Four of the five thought-energy states are:

  1. Maiea
  2. Brahma
  3. Vishnu
  4. Shiva

These each have three expressions of which two are applicable to ordinarywallas (being the positive and negative cycles). It has to be remembered that all four states are interwoven and interlinked. They exist in both their positive and negative templates as an everyday occurrence, and they flip between various expressions moment to moment.

Ordinarywallas are familiar with the trinity state concept of Hinduism, namely, Brahma – the coagulator, Vishnu – the stabilizer, and Shiva – the transmutator. Enveloping and preceding them is state one, the Maiea symmetry.

State one: Sacrifice of the inner self. Doubt is sacrificed, and clarity sought in the process.

State two: Grain and seasonal food become the sacrificial norm. Ego gains importance.

State three: Animal offering, followed by human offering, becomes the status quo.

State four: A proxy sacrifice is established in place of personal sacrifice, such that material objects become the sacrificial lamb.

Whichever way we look at it, the practice of making an offering during the period of regeneration, i.e. Spring, is driven by the norms of one’s customs.

To begin with, nature make a sacrifice of crops, and humans harvest and consume that sacrifice (death) once the crop or fruit is ripe. Thus, the concept of consuming death is itself nature-driven. We as humans eat death. Many, like myself, who are life-long lacto-vegetarian, pompously register our distain for eating death in the form of flesh. Yet we consume the dead. The dead in our instance are dead vegetables.

Pomposity in us compels us to declare we are superior to flesh-eaters. But are we, outside of our own high-falutin’ sense of authority, really superior at all to, and more internally advanced than, those we think of as emotionally-retarded, spiritually bereft, dead-flesh eating savages? No, we are exactly the same.

What is a vegetarian (Indian)? Let’s clear up the gobbledegook western terminology:

Selective Vegetarian (SV)       white meat eater, will consume eggs and fish

Vegetarian (V)                           will not consume eggs or fish – however, is not a vegan

Restricted Vegetarian (RV)     will not consume root or commercial vegetables

Vegan                                           will not consume dairy, eats commercial vegetables

Inaccurately, in the west, those who do eat eggs, fish and commercial vegetables, but not dairy, call themselves vegan. To date, however, I have yet to meet one who fulfills the criteria of the ultra strict vegetarian diet of Jainism.

Side Note: Dairy, natural yogurt and ghee are quintessential staples of the diet of Jain ascetics The above sentence is part of an old argument people would try to hammer me on regarding fats and cholesterol, when I maintained that fats and cholesterol are a quintessential components needed for a flexible healthy body, while manufactured foods are the evil that we need to reject totally. Thus, honey is fine as well as all nuts, but white sugar and processed food will prove to be the foundations of virulent disease, as opposed to dysfunctional bio-sphere disease. God, I was even hammered mercilessly when I maintained that healthy four-times-a-week sex was vital to retain youthfulness.

Smug?

Well yes, it is nice to be proven right, however if one is treading the inner awakening path, tutored by a descending Being, then sexual activity goes out of the window totally lest it be under strict conditions, in tandem with strict adherence to diet, coupled with several other observations that are mandatory…and the chances of meeting, and then being taken under the wing of a descending Being are between remote to never.

Leaving aside the pompous grandstanding of the vegetarians or those who follow the Jain diet, I put forward the concept that animals who eat a living Being, be that a leaf still attached to it stalk and branch, or an animal consumed alive, are better dieticians and far more honest Beings than the hypocrite vegetarian looking down on the meat-eating human.

And to the meat-eaters I ask: Simply because the animal you eat is not configured as a human does this make you any less a cannibal?

The majority of animals consumed share more than 50% DNA with humans. So how is it that eating an animal, which shares any percentage of DNA with a human, is not cannibalism?

Serious points to ponder.

An interesting side note: Fertilizer, earth and water, and the transformation of the three energy systems via a seedling into an edible vegetable is Shiva configuration in action. This is a very good example of transmutation. In simple terms, death of one entity giving life to a more progressive life form.

Reverting…

The concept of a sacrifice, in honour of nature’s regeneration in the northern hemisphere, is built into the human psyche. The Sikhs, annually, make the same sacrifice.

This year, Sikhs will celebrate their New Year on 13th March 2016. This date is lunar-based and changes annually.

Globally, the sacrifice the Sikhs will make on this date is several hours of repetitive prayer that invokes dissolution of

  • disease
  • mental problems
  • emotional ill-will

…and that seeks to replace it with peaceful resolution amongst all living beings, be they human or non-human.

But at the same time, Sikhs love a party, and the arrival of Spring will be no exception.

This year, from 25th – 27th March, the spiritual activity of defensive war games, hand-to-hand armed combat and other such disciplines will be practiced and celebrated in Panjab, and by Sikhs globally. The food offered and consumed will be lacto-vegetarian, and not a single desire for commercial partying will be exercised.

Please, join me as I invite you to share a miniscule moment of your time by either visiting a place of worship to say a prayer, or expressing a thought for global peace amongst all humans.

Alternatively, light a jôt or candle*, but like me do it on the quiet, and buy someone less fortunate than yourself a meal.

*(Candle and Jôt: Represents light. The wick is humanity’s ego, the beeswax or ghee is sinless purity. The flame is the divine nature. Five types of incense are used, representing five positive classifications of awakening. The five negative classifications are Kama-Lust, Krodh-anger-rage-wrath, Lobha-greed, Moha-attachment-delusion, Ahankar-ego-arrogance-nescience; or as I prefer, the five positives are non-violence, truth, non-stealing, controlled-chastity, non-attachment.)

My prayers are with you all, and I request that you accept my wish for your health and emotional well-being…and smile. No matter what, just smile.

The Crucifixion Tie

From a young age I had a natural flair for perception that entailed an intimate understanding of phenomena beyond self-consciousness. Artistic simplifications, such as marrying multiple and totally unrelated colours, made complete sense to me though others found it confusing. Even now, when I paint, if my paintbrush touches a colour I never baulk at using it regardless of its relationship to adjacent colours. Eventually the colour palette looks satisfactory; and albeit that it may seem strange, it appeals.

Similarly, quantum consciousness is an omnivorously transcendent yet simplistic entity. However, to the ordinarywallahs it is like a swaggering revolution, laced with panoramic blandness.

In the England of my childhood – a hard, unforgiving, intolerant, rude, obnoxious society – I chose to wear unshorn hair proudly. Then, upon entering the secondary school system, aged eleven or so, I chose to wear a full adult turban. The turban made me stand out, ofcourse. However, no one ever made a demeaning or derogatory remark that I ever heard regarding my turban, in school or outside of it.

At a personal level, growing up, I greeted some people with humour, and kept others at a distance, since by now my ESP gave me insight into their nasty minds, and so I kept them at arm’s length. Humour and mischief were my natural traits. The combination would get me into trouble, and just as often get me out of many a tight situation.

When I took the first steps in a career that I chose rather than the one chosen for me, I found it irritating to have to wear a suit, boot and tie. The regimented dress felt like being back at school. But what my chosen career environment allowed me to do was to use my intuitive ability against the tax regime, and to suggest appropriate legal vehicles for lowering or mitigating death duty, now called inheritance tax. I was good. I read endlessly, especially the older tax regulations, and I always found an overlooked or forgotten law or rule to resuscitate that would help lower tax liabilities. The joy was not the income I derived from such work, but the intellectual sharpness I engaged to manoeuvre the tax regime in my favour. In fact, I found the taxman (they were all men at that time) very friendly and accommodating, and not in the least overbearing or threatening. They were there to complete a remit given by the government of the day. And they did that very well. I was there to see a way around the government’s latest methods to raid more of one’s income, saving or inheritance.

An accountant’s job is to tell you how much tax you have to pay. A tax planner’s duty is to locate a legal framework to lower the same. They are two very different disciplines. The most telling aspect of my personality was my strict adherence to the fact that tax had to be paid, and that foul means would not be entertained in order to circumvent this. Coupled with this was my ability to see an investment opportunity in the financial or property market. I worked mostly on a limited part-time basis, and only to assist the select few, and increasingly I refused to accept any monetary payment in return. My job satisfaction was derived from being able to find a method to lower tax liability which others from the same discipline were unable to find or hadn’t even considered. Money never motivated me. A sense of accomplishment enthused and sustained me then, as it does to this day.

One day, when I was visiting a colleague to advise his team of financial advisors, his boss invited me for a chat in his office. He offered me a job with a very handsome remuneration package. I asked if he was a practicing Christian and also a stickler for office discipline. His answer to both was affirmative. In response, I suggested that he appoint somebody else since I would have to decline his generous offer. He was dumbfounded and sought an explanation. As a Sikh, I told him, I refuse to wear the insignia confirming my adherence to Christianity and which underscores Jesus Christ of Nazareth as my god-conduit. The man was taken aback, but he composed himself and offered to exempt me from having to wear a tie. I thanked him, before pointing out that office discipline was vital for productivity, and that others would follow my lead and request various laxities and relaxations around the office, which would in turn affect the functioning of the office.

About twenty-five years after this incident, and while I was at a Gujarati curry-café (what the hell is a curry house?) someone called out my name; the face looked familiar. We greeted each other warmly and the man insisted that I meet his family, who were dining at the same place. Gathering his large extended family together, he pointed to me and said, “You know I am always telling you about a very proud Sardarji [Sardarji is the title for a turban-wearing Sikh], with very strong principles, who would not sell out his faith for any amount of money? Well, this is that gentleman.” Duly impressed, the family returned to their seats, and I turned to ask what on earth was he on about. The man reminded me about the job offer that had been made me all those years ago, recounted to me my reasons for turning it down, and relayed to me how impressed the company’s entire staff – of whom he was one – had been with my integrity for not selling out my strong beliefs in return for a very handsome financial package. “As a matter of interest, how much does that position pay now?” I enquired. “With someone of your ability, well over a six figure sum plus bonuses”. “Wow”, I thought to myself, “I turned it down, I must have been mad.” Yet, the reality is that even today I would refuse to accept that offer if it meant I had to wear a tie.

All my shirts are collarless. And I have always worn an amended version of the traditional Indian jacket/coat over the shirt. And, yes, I look very handsome in that outfit.

Since my early adulthood, I have been sharing why non-Christians need not wear a tie, as it signifies being a Christian. The tie stands for both the cross, and the crucifixion of Jesus Christ of Nazareth. However, the fear of not getting a job, or even of losing one, exerts enormous blackmail-style pressure on individuals to wear a tie. It is a very sad and indeed narrow mindset that makes the European world insist that everyone dress like them, or else you will not get a job, or land the much-needed business deal. What do the Europeans fear?

Is the race-European any less moronic than the Islamist who insists women wear the face veil and be covered from head to toe?

It seems you can paint your house any colour, as long as it is bland.

Someone is suffering from a lack of self-esteem, and in doing so they are the mirror image of the “fanatical Islamist”.

To the Sikhs who appear on England-based television stations I appeal: please have the dignity to not wear the Christian tie under your long beards. You are not Christians, nor are you emotional cowards. Your confused dress gives out an equally confusing subliminal message to the viewers. It says: be a Sikh, but put a higher value on yourself by dressing like a Christian.

How sad.

I do not want Christians, Jews or Muslims to dress like me, a Sikh.

You call only your mother “mother”, and I call only my mother, “mother”. Why do you insist that I have to call your mother and not my own, “mother”?

Please, grow up, and enjoy cultural diversity.

We in England are very lucky to have a fantastic and fascinating global community, culture, diet, and integration. Yes, we are integrated. And no, we do not want or need to mimic the European cultural-ethnic style to indicate integration, for that is insulting to both the host migrants and the new migrants. We need to value diversity, and not crucify it into blandness like the indigenous migrants demand.

And always remember that the people now called Indians were the ones who vacated the land that came subsequently to be occupied by Caucasians, and that now is called Europe.

Humans have always been and will always remain migrants.

Another truth humans cannot escape is that we are guardian-tenants of a land, we are never its owners.

Something to reflect on.

On revising scripts and calendars: An open letter to Maharani Preneet Kaur of Patiala

Improvements, revisions, and modifications are deemed a necessity lest an academic is pigeon-holed as a non-entity. Applause of a newer schism is acceptable, but to be ignored or deemed unremarkable is the ego-death nail to an academic.

The above paragraph is borrowed from my essay ‘Changes to Alphabet’. In that essay I discuss how English letters evolved, being in some cases joined together, eventually either to be dropped or replaced. The essay took shape after a Sikh academic from North America descended on this little island and delivered a polished, well-rehearsed gobbledygook word-speak. A mooncalf let loose simply because he could deliver a polished talk. As for the content – I was left waiting for content, but it never arrived. What I heard instead was nonsense packaged with the panache of a campus novelette.

The problem with revisionists and academics is that in their desire to ‘be someone’ they attain Idiocy. Many who read my work are aware of the definition that we, from our background, use to identify ‘stupid’ – an individual who has read five books on a given subject and thinks that makes for expertise. An idiot takes that belief to a whole new level and begins expounding the ‘idealism’ therein.

Sikhs make for a great anthropological study. A recent history. An evolving culture. An old cultural heritage whose source is lost in antiquity. Sikhs are consciously and constantly redefining themselves. However, their psyche repeatedly pulls them towards their inner source – into events and time that current conscious memory has forgotten …my kind of a big deal, really.

Yes, I am privileged to be born a Sikh (each birth in a given faith and culture has a reason – the subject for different essay), and I love studying Sikhs. Doing so is primarily for my own benefit in that I explore, examine, explain, and understand myself; and this then allows me to better understand how established cultures, languages, and scripts evolved.

Take the example of the Sikh calendar.

Sikhs have been in haste to separate themselves from ‘Hinduism’, which to this moment they consider a curse on their identity. Yet, as I have openly and vociferously explained, Sikhism precedes Hinduism by 150 years or so. In such an environment limited knowledge can be a dangerous thing. The so-called educated elite, those who scraped through to the Ivy League institutions in the United States, were unable to explain why the birth of Guru Gobind Singhji, the tenth Sikh Guru, sometimes has two birthdays in a calendar year, sometimes one, and sometimes none. They decided the fault lay with the Hindu calendar and Hindu mischief, and they wallowed in their complete ignorance of the facts behind such things.

This educated elite were/are so dumb that they could not explain that the phenomenon of Guruji’s birthday happening once, twice or not at all in a year was due to the fact that the Gregorian calendar starts almost two-thirds of the way into the Vedic (Sikh) calendar. Thus in the Sikh calendar, Guruji’s birthday indeed happens only once a year. Nor could they explain that all Sikh, Vedic, Hindu and Buddhist dates are aligned with and in keeping with the organic function of planet Earth, and are based on the cycle of the moon. In this cycle, dates change annually: the organic conveying a procession that is neither mechanical nor machine-precise. Being organic, it requires grey matter to comprehend its function, the very grey matter that is fast becoming extinct due to the lazy reliance on, and utilization of, computers.

Hell, even I have become a victim of computers, for I have forgotten how to spell basic words, relying totally on spell-check. On top of that, I am fast losing my in-built sense of direction, which I have always used to sense the position of the sun or where the cardinal points of the earth lie. I have become utterly dependent on GPS systems to get around.

To revert, the USA-educated elite who graduated in one type of ‘ology’ or another, rather than use their commonsense or become masters of astrology or astronomy, bleated endlessly and ran down the Sikh hierarchy and authority at Amritsar. They called them illiterate and rural and accused them of not moving with the times or being modern enough. The global rolling stone pressure exerted by the rest of the expatriate ‘educated’ Sikhs forced the Amritsar authority to sanction a study.

Sod’s law, where idiots reign more idiots mushroom to champion the new idiotic thought.

A Sikh lecturer in Canada took hold of the reins, aware that if he could muster enough money for a seat at his university he would become a professor. He duly raised funds on the back of the emotional outcry over the Sikh calendar, and in his spare time he ‘studied’ astrology and astronomy.

Idiot can only lead idiots. The idiot led. Idiots followed. The authorities in Amritsar voiced their objections to the ideas taking root, only to be called rural (an insult in India denoting backwardness).

The idiotic professor, having secured his chair, became a chameleon, changing colour to suit his surroundings. He touched a raw nerve and exploited the belief that Sikhs were being misled by Hindus. The Hindus, he exhorted, have been manipulating the calendar since the beginning of time, and they caused the demise of Buddhism in India. He further claimed that the Hindus have every intention of overpowering Sikhism and turning it into a branch of Hinduism just as they did with Buddhism. He conveniently leaves aside the fact that Buddhism ebbed out of India and flourished in Greater India, Myanmar and beyond, simply because this suited its emotional requirements.

The Sikhs bought into the myth he spouted. The masses loved his delivery. After all, he was a professor at a Canadian university. One does not become a professor at a western university without deep powerful knowledge.

Wow. Deep powerful knowledge. Professorship! What next? Sun, shine, backside – and hey presto, a professorship!

The professor went on to detail how in 13,000 years January would become June, and June would become January, if Sikhs followed the Hindu calendar. All of this was down to the cunning Hindus and their calendar, insidiously mocking and subverting time.

All however was not lost. He had an answer to the problem. A knight in a shining armour he was for the Sikhs.

His solution?

That the Sikhs ditch the Hindu calendar. For, Sikhs are not slaves of Hindus. Instead, Sikhs should take up a solar-based calendar, the Gregorian calendar in effect.

Err, excuse me, is that not swapping one slave master for another? Never mind me, I’m just splitting hairs. Did you get that pun? Splitting hairs…and me, a Sikh!

The educated Sikhs clamoured for the company of the saviour professor. An alien Guru had descended on Sikhism from a university in Canada.

I recall how I stood alone and apart from the braying crowd on the issue. Nobody wanted to listen to facts when they could instead organise Sikhism’s separation from Hinduism, finally freeing themselves from those they believed were their progenitors. Nobody at the time wanted to hear or accept that Hinduism was invented 150 years after Sikhism. A minor detail, irrelevant, they told me.

So, the Sikhs recreated their calendar, throwing it in the faces of the very Gurus who had accepted the tradition of the Vedic calendar. The very same Gurus whose written word in Guru Granth Sahib Ji they themselves deem sacrosanct, were dismissed out of hand as a mirage, along with the calendar dates cited within the Sri Guru Granth Sahibji, because it suited the ‘educated’ Sikhs to do so.

The wonderment of the new Sikh calendar flew in the face of commonsense and reason. It gave Sikhdom a single shared date on which to celebrate the enthronement of one Guruji and the cremation of the preceding Guruji.

Educated idiots at their excellent idiotic best.

But, hey, at least the calendar separated Sikhs from Hindus. Never mind that the dates of events were now totally out of sync with reality, and were not in keeping with the monthly, lunar-cycle based prayers set forth in Sri Guru Granth Sahibji. You see, for all their denial about astrology, Sikhs in fact conduct prayers at the new moon as well as at the full moon, as set in the Sri Guru Granth Sahibji. But since the Vedic traditional cycle month, as accepted in the Sikh scriptures, starts one third of the way into the Gregorian calendar – or to put it accurately, the Gregorian calendar starts two thirds of the way into the Vedic calendar – the advent of the new Sikh calendar overthrew many a traditional event.

The basic fact which the Sikhs would not accept from me was that the alien Guru Professor from the Canadian university had misled. He did not share the information that the 13,000 year astrological process is in fact only half a cycle, and that when the full cycle takes place, after 26,000 years, June would again fall in June. But, hey, that’s a minor omission, as long as the Sikhs are able to cut their ties to Hindus. That the Hindus evolved after the Sikhs was another truth unacceptable to the Sikhs at the time of this debate.

When are we taking about? 1998.

Almost 20 years on, I am pleased to share with you that Sikhs are getting around to ditching the new calendar. In time, it will be totally ignored.

But, if you think a lesson has been learned by the Sikhs as a result of this debacle, hell no!

For now we have Maharani Preneet Kaur of Patiala, an MP there until 2014, who has funded, via a ‘Local Area Development’ scheme, the ‘Advance Centre for Technical Development of Punjabi language, Literature & Culture’, at the Punjabi University of Patiala.

Her Royal Highness Maharani Preneet Kaur is an excellent example of an apologist ignorant of real facts, who supports an idea as long as it sounds good and gives her credit in some way, shape or form.

The first point to note is that after more than half a century of independence, people like Her Royal Highness do not have the presence of dignity, mind, or credibility to use the correct spelling of Panjab or Panjabi, insisting instead on using the ignorant Anglo-Saxon spelling of Punjabi or Punjab.

So, what should I expect from her involvement other than ignorance masquerading as fact, and the advancement of false knowledge?

The study group has under the patronage of the Maharani announced on its website that a new set of letters has been added to Punjabi/Panjabi.

Excuse me, since when did Panjabi (Punjabi) become a separate script from Gurmukhi, (its original name) which was formulated by the Sikh Gurus, and completed particularly by the second Guruji, Guru Angaddevji, under instruction from Guru Nanakdevji, thereby making it sacrosanct? Panjabi is not a separate script from Gurmukhi. They are one and the same. Yet, Her Royal Highness, out of sheer ignorance, or desire for importance like the educated idiots, has allowed her name and prestige to be connected to a mess very much like that of the 1998 Sikh calendar change.

The argument she and her acolytes make is that as Sikhs interact on the global stage, so they adopt new foreign words, which in turn requires that Panjabi (Punjabi) create new alphabet letters to deal with them. Ok, let us examine their argument.

I have yet to come across a similar example in any of the European languages, where foreign words beget new letters in the alphabet. Even in Magyar, the language of Hungary, a language entirely separate from its neighbours and which is spoken by only 10-12 million people, new words find a resonance and are integrated within the existing vocal context and written spectrum. There is no inferiority complex requiring that the word be pronounced exactly as it is in its original language, or that new alphabet letters be arbitrarily created to pay such unnecessary homage.

The Anglo-Saxon spelling and pronunciation of the majority of Indian towns, cities and landmarks did not require race-Europeans to re-examine their own script to accommodate these Indian names and terms. To this day, I do not know what Punjab is or what it means. I know what Panjab is. But Punjab? No idea, other than a deliberate desire to insult the Sikhs by mispronouncing the name of their country.

Jaggernaath is a Vedic term limited to indicating a large rolling-wheeled mechanism that carries a particular Vedic, now Hindu, object of reverence and worship. Indian maturity and sensibility would never consider or allow the term to be used in any setting other than that. Anglo-Saxons abused the word and its connotation and designation. They changed its spelling to fit into English alphabetic constraints, whereupon it was spelled ‘juggernaut’, and came to mean a large-wheeled lorry carrying any kind of cargo including meat, whereas its function and name had originally referred to a conveyance limited to religious and faith-based use only.

Bombay. A word which people of my father’s generation and those before him found insulting, but which they were forced to use by the British. How on earth could the (arrogant) British not pronounce Mumbai? Instead, they overcame their own inferior self-worth through intimidation, bullying, and threats of exclusion from mainstream affairs, and forced Indians to adopt the new spelling and pronunciation of Mumbai. Hence, Bombay.

Avtar. The actual English spelling is meant to be Av-v-tar. Above the first ‘A’ is a diacritical mark that requires that the following character be pronounced twice. Yet the Anglo-Saxons initially insisted on pronouncing it as Avta. The ‘r’ would remain silent. Then the pronunciation in western America changed it to Av-a-taar. How on earth does Avataar spell Avtar?

Yoga/Joga. Yoga is very much older than Sanskrit, but is used in pure Sanskrit. Regardless, in all north Indian languages it has always been pronounced as Jog or Joga. The word Joga is used in Sri Guru Granth Sahibji by the Sikh Gurus. So, now, will Her Royal Highness champion the removal of the word Jog/Joga from north Indian speech because the Europeans are not familiar with the word and refuse to consider its usage? Europeans were initially introduced to the word Jog/Joga in the nineteenth century and it is found in the literature of that era. But imperial self-consciousness and lack of self-worth meant that the word had to be changed to Yoga, which the Europeans found to their consternation existed in pure Sanskrit.

In Panjabi we have a very soft ‘t’, a medium ‘t’, and a hard ‘t’. The English lexicon to date refuses to accommodate the need for the real three dimensational Panjabi letter ‘t’.

So, why, oh why, do the Panjabi and the Indian ruling elite think they have to construct new letters to accommodate words from around the world, in order to speak them as the natives do, lest they be accused of lacking ‘modernity’, when nobody else does?

If the Panjabi educated ruling elites’ sense of self-worth is measured by their servile need to create new Gurmukhi characters, then I invite them to huddle together and create a totally new alphabet for social, commercial and enterprise usage and to leave Gurmukhi alone as a language and a script solely for Sikh religious use.

If she is to be engaged in anything, let Maharani Preneet Kaur of Patiala sponsor and support that kind of activity. Her current course of action focused on denigrating Gurmuki/Panjabi script – and seemingly reinforced by the common person in Patiala who lionises her (but who those of her ilk cannot see as anything other than beggers and spongers) – is akin to the Nazi destruction of German literature in 1933.

Leave the gift of Gurmukhi alone.

Your Royal Highness Maharani Preneet Kaur of Patiala, please stop interfering in an excellent language originated by the Sikh Gurus, unless you feel you are better equipped and ought to supersede them. Your Royal Highness, you are making a colossal mistake. A mistake so gross in its ramifications, that it will be a harbinger of the demise of Sikhism as it stands.

Your Royal Highness, consider yourself advised…or reprimanded.

Your choice.

You choose.

Sikh and Meditation

Throughout this life’s tenure, I have witnessed the goodwill intentions in all living species. Such intentions turn out, however, to be unbelievably short-lived, especially when confronted with the self-preservation that comprises the core element of most species’ existence. That said, outright hatred seems to be a trait specific to no species except humans.

As I have developed, I have come to recognise that the disparity between humans and other species, the leap from self-preservation to hatred, has myriad causal factors. I also am aware that neutralizing the ethereal cloud would enable the human bio-system to express and exercise balanced caring behaviour – goodwill, in other words. I also know, however, that it is unfortunately impossible to effect the neutralization necessary to make this happen.

Yet, people do want to escape the iron-ore prison cage of this planet; they do long for escape routes out of the straitened conditions and structures that poison their goodwill with hatred. Meditation is the means by which to achieve this goal. And Sikh meditation, in particular.

So, what’s the problem?

The problem is this: meditation is the proto-theorists’ unpolished sculpture; a figurine poem personified as a satirical memory of holier preservation, misunderstood by all except itself.

The point missed by all is this: mediation is a living entity. It is a life-form. It has its own boundaries, its own likes and dislikes. Let me give it a gender, and then it will make sense.

Meditation is female. She is demure, seldom raises her eyes, communicates subtly, suffers willingly, and never complains. Meditation is always accommodating, never demanding. She cannot be enjoyed through brute force; nor seduced by any means. She decides upon whom she will shower affection, if at all. But if you are not standing in line, along a path that she may pass, then you have zero chance of experiencing her.

Let’s face it, if meditation was yours to have as and when you choose, then you would all be the Buddhas and the Guru Nanakdevjis of this planet.

In what follows, I endeavour to explain the whys and wherefores of meditation; and in the process, I introduce you to the higher echelons of Sikh meditation. I do so through a combination of facts and analogy, having long realised that tangible explanations that people can readily relate to drive the point home better than any regurgitation of throw-away scriptural lines ever could.

The human species is divided into three groups. The topmost group comprises the sexually unmoved. The other two groups are the gays and the straights, the latter comprising the ‘straight darwinists’ and ‘straight deists’ (SaD).

SaD males know where Antarctica is, but none wants to go there. As in life, so in love-making: men have zero interest in acquainting themselves with or understanding the clitoris. They know it exists, but it does so as an abstract, an ephemeral thing even. As with the clitoris, so with meditation. And women, mimicking men, miss the point too; they also fall foul in their endeavours to even recognise where the essence of meditation hovers about them in order to establish contact, engage in communication, and eventually become its resident.

To enter meditation you need to experience death. In fact, you need to die. Death followed by cremation is the dissolution of all internal emotional, physical, and psychological connections. The psyche has to die, or if you prefer, be ‘liberated’. Individuality has to die, (or merge) into the greater individuality. ‘You’ must not exist. It is not enough not to fear non-existence. You must become non-existent.

At their apex, the Advanced Beings (now a distant memory) developed several methods to try and achieve self-understanding. When Guru Nanakdevji assumed the responsibility that others before him had failed to comprehend, many of these Advanced Beings took birth during his life period in order to try and move beyond their own attained statuses, into a more refined arena. To be part of his entourage they had to accept Guru Nanakdevji’s test of social integration coupled with social detachment.

The initial Sikhs were extremely advanced beings. They all belonged to one particular set or type of meditation: dangerous, frightening, and capable of leading to your demise. The first time practicing such meditation is very scary indeed. A group of Sikhs forced me in my younger days to show them this form of meditation and to put them through the process. When I reached the end stage of the first level, the idea facing them made some of them scream, while others were deeply frightened, and the rest visibly shaken. Never again have I allowed an unqualified group to experience the same.

Here I am going to introduce you to the lowest rung, the initial base, of the old Sikh meditation regime. It is not in fact different from most meditation techniques. Of course, I am not going to share how to recognise the meditation cloud about you. That would be irresponsible and dangerous. People allocate some of the most absurd attributes to meditation. You have no idea how fatal meditation can be. It is not peace, love and lentils, where hippies wear open-toed sandals and make love to their own long beards, and where women skip in the summer breeze in flowery full-length flowing skirts and cheesecloth blouses sans bras and their hair in braids. No. Meditation is a loaded gun. And one does not leave a loaded gun lying around.

The rungs of advancement in meditation are diet-based, thought-based, and emotion-based, in this order. Eventually one enters the humility and servile base. I have called it ‘rungs of advancement in meditation’ but none of this is meditation. It is preparation, the digging of the foundation. Meditation hasn’t even started yet. In fact, you are pre-programmed to fail if you attempt meditation since none of this preparatory work has been done, and which would itself take several decades to complete. So, although you can see the rainbow …that is all it is and will remain: a rainbow, a pathway, a map marked with a big ‘X’, but with no clue as to which spot on the planet the ‘X’ refers.

Now do you appreciate why meditation always fails?

People assume meditation is about finding peace or calmness: ‘I am balancing myself’, or ‘I have centered myself’, or best of all, ‘I enter the light’.

What?

What ruddy light are you talking about? When I am in a mischievous mood, I ask people who say these things whether they have ever met a blind person and have ventured to ask them if they have seen the ‘light’. The question is, how would a blind person recognise light? This is one of the misnomers of my environment. A sure-fire way we differentiate between the wannabes and the rare genuine article. The light we refer to is not light per se. You either experience it or not. Those who experience it communicate with each other through the medium of light. So those at my level know who is connected to the light and who is not. But, hey, why undermine the wannabes? At least they are not enthusing each other to kill for the sake of self-importance just because the ‘other’ is different.

Another End of a Beginning

A new club is formed. It makes a set of rules, followed by regulations. With these new conditions in place, the club becomes a humanitarian society, its ethos is to care for everything. It is eventually relabelled a sect. The sect then takes on the mantle of religion. Eventually, the ordinary, thoughtful activity embedded in humanitarianism becomes a fully fledged rites-and-ritual society. Once evolution has taken its toll, the rites-and-ritual evolves into Dharma: A lifestyle, unquestionable loyalty, an emotional bedrock sustaining well-being of the mortal coil to the unseen. At this juncture, modernity can take a running jump unless the forefathers had the insight to ensure that their new club had a place in modernity, and its ongoing manifestations, for better or worse. Non-European and non-Semitic belief systems fall into the Dharma bracket. European Christianity remains at the religion junction. Interestingly, Christianity practiced by non-Europeans automatically and immediately roots itself in the Dharma arena, due to their subjectivities and their racial traits.

A European Christian’s vehicle for control and conformity of the masses occurs via an organised church retaining a classical ethos – a society founded on Hebrew, Latin, and Greek literature and history. The church: A venerable organisation once held in high esteem, now arcane, and a relic at odds with its comical repackaging, where the dog collar and ‘father and mother’ or ‘brother and sister’ habit-wearer shelter as a new sound-image-bite of casual clothing and first names, in the vain hope of retaining a semblance of its past mystic authority and glory.

Dharma (pronounced ‘the-r-ma’): the non-European belief system is a lifestyle encompassing the realities of several astral lifestyles enjoyed in any given moment, and it is accepted as being as real as you are to yourself. By problematic comparison, religion limits itself to the here-and-now, with unsustainable concepts of the afterlife.

The term religion has become so obscure to all but its practitioners, as to curtail broader public acceptance, such that we now have people searching for its meaning, and being guided to the classics for this.

Europeans, toes curled as if enduring extreme pain, eventually admit when asked to being religious. It’s as if membership is an obligation rather than an honour. Christianity is throwing money at marketing itself and reinventing its core image, in the vain hope of curing its decay. Endowments are provided to re-image its doorways and its gatekeepers. An earnest attempt is made to re-package the word religion itself. Meanwhile, in order to retain a semblance of similarity to its origins, its erstwhile leaders hang on to its classic roots as if to some fundamental design template, and its connection to the antiquities.

Consequently, it emerges as Janus-faced and foists this emblem of confusedly facing both ways upon its members. They in turn look confusedly for an identity, a shelter, an image that might make them equal with Dharma.

Of all the Greek writers, the comic playwright Aristophanes would have the biggest field day with all this confusion.

Religion is literature. Dharma is soul. Europeans are desperately seeking soul, but their loyalty to the literature of ‘Christianity’ complicates their stance. Losing face, and internally admiring of Dharma, they feel themselves traitors for embracing this logical ‘other’ in their midst.

Religion has never been a healer. Religion is an earnest corrector of textural errors. Beyond that it flounders. Through religion one can become a great word-gamer. But word games do not feed the soul. They do not heal the psyche within. Mythologies, Biblical and impressive, are a scholar’s nightmare. Where on one hand they decree love for all, in the next sentence they give unequal authority over everything in creation: God created you, but gave you free will outside God’s domain and control. What next, the statement that woman was created from a man’s rib?!

Dharma has one theme. It is simple. You are created by an unseen, unfathomable source. You are answerable to that source, full stop. You have no authority other than to protect and care for all creation. It’s a simple code that does not sit well with the Jews, Muslims or Christians.

As an outsider, and when as a child I observed the conundrum of Judaism, I concluded that a Muslim is a Jew who will not tolerate anything outside scriptural lore. A Christian also follows the Jewish faith, but colours it with its psychopathic meanderings; a killer who enjoys killing for the sake of enjoyment.

If we look at pre-Socratics societies, we learn that Hellenistic scholars argued and developed glossaries and ideas, giving phonetic notes in order to arrive at a conclusion. Roman scholars took this as a base and ran with ideas that underpinned monastic norms. The modernity of the time we now dismissively call the medieval age stole a march on all this, in a way that is still confusing today. Not so medieval after all. The term medieval was coined by religious scholars around the 17th century, and was the result of about three hundred years of classical resurgence.

During the Reformation period, the monasteries reappraised the Jewish texts, and their offspring the Biblical texts. However, unpalatable truths reared their ugly heads. The enlightened thus engaged Jews of Hebrew descent from the Holy land. These Honest Johns spoke truths and facts, and maintained that the phoneticization of their language by earlier European scholars was a false construct. Hence, they maintained that official Biblical texts contained serious errors. Religion took a hit. It haemorrhaged. So, a compromise was arrived at that sullied, diluted and removed the formal boundaries. A mishmash was contrived.

The contrived mishmash now accepted as gospel won’t allow for detailed study of Christianity. The true facts are shrouded and left for scholars to debate over. Erudite academics, and outsider scholars, have created arenas challenging the Christian scholars, creating an invisible apartheid, where each side is frightened of the eventual outcome, so they gloss over the facts hoping for piece-meal acceptance of the minor revelation as and when revealed, where barbaric rites-and-rituals are watered, and the unacceptable behaviour of the Greeks and the Romans quietly hidden under carpets, eventually becoming material for anthropologists to unravel.

Christianity’s glue began decaying around the mid to late 19th century. Lip service seeped into the adulations and attachment of Europeans to the religion. Venturing physically outwards and en masse, into worlds thus far known only through folklore, Christians realised just how weak and petty their religion actually was. The automatic, natural, and evolutionary revolution that should have taken place in Christianity, but which was suppressed by the rulers and their monastic aides, prevented any opportunity that European religion might have in developing into Dharma. Authority, ignorance and fear triumphed over natural progression and selection.

The Bible has now become the intellectual’s ‘Harry Potter’ books. However, the detrimental effect of the loss of a formal reference and its subjective avenues has left the European race functioning as a human-born paraplegic. The mind wants to participate, but the formal, natural, physical limitations are an obstacle in experiencing the inner reward of participation in Dharma. Cyber limbs allow participation, but there is always a ‘what if’ or ‘if only’ in such minds. European Christianity as it stands today cannot and does not heal the soul. Due to this stunted growth, the mid 20th century witnessed a formal attack on Christianity’s irrelevance. Leninist learning replaced Greek and Latin literature, and well-founded arguments were made as to whether Rome was the creation of a tyrannical uprising turned imperialistic power.

Today, I see European Christianity trying to find its footing as a basic humanitarian sect, willing at times to embrace global literature in an attempt at self-study rather than remaining isolated. However, when I visit Christian seminaries unannounced, I experience the same age-old isolationist impulse that subdues the internal intellect and instead wants outside influence to rearrange core Christian scripture, while also lacking the humility to seek that input and without addressing the perceived inadequacies and inherent lies that underpin the Bible. Personal study of the original texts in ancient Hebrew is dismissed, and opaque translations from the internet are used as an authority.

However, I see in the Christian leaders’ eyes despair and recognition that they cannot genuinely debate immortality, samskar and the hereafter.

So, what hope for the ordinarywala in the street, fed a diet of psycho nonsense that we are about to be attacked by ISIS – who in all honesty cannot organise an orthodox Islamic wedding without getting into a long-term feud over appropriate rites-and-rituals?

The new religion of Europeans is an endless stream of ‘knowledge’ of the antiquities from Hollywood. Powered by such anti-knowledge and its nouveau Christian complexion, the ordinarywala is manipulated into yet another war against an enemy who is foaming at its mouth against followers of its own faith.

The white elephant in the room questions: ‘Had Christianity evolved centuries ago, would it still want to bomb, for no other reason than that ISIS is from another racial group, albeit a side involved in a primarily internal Islamic fight?’

Let’s imagine that during both the 1914 and 1939 European wars China had the means to autocratically bomb the hell out of each and every part of Europe in order to ‘stop’ an attack on itself based on an irate Christian announcing that European lack of self-worth was due to the modernity and achievements of China. How would the rank-and-file Europeans feel towards the Chinese?

The rank-and-file European would feel anger and hatred about the Chinese ability to arbitrarily kill one section of a European community after another.

Had Christianity evolved in its normal manner into Dharma, then the current ongoing Europeans lack of self-esteem and mass inferiority complex that requires killing of others from a different racial group and engaging in race-hate wars, would not take place.

The Mumbai carnage response was Dharmic, compared with the response to the twin towers attack.

I maintain that if someone cuts off your arm, pray that no one cuts off his hand. This is Dharma in action. Guys, life happens. It is an inescapable template. Each and every insult and attack does not always require an equally or more forceful answer. Life is for living with an open loving mind, and loving thoughts.

After all, cancer is a disease. So why do the Europeans not bomb it?

Islam, a faith I personally have great difficulty with, is undergoing evolution. It is going through birth pains. Leave it alone. The sooner it relaxes into its evolution, the sooner that area of our very small globe will find peace.

I, as an old fashioned Sikh, can only indicate. The rest is up to the motley crew who are confused with what exactly is their role in the world. Europeans without a religion which, by all rights, ought to have evolved into Dharma, are confused and at a loss. As a result, they feel the need to lead.

But a toddler cannot lead nor give advice to its adults.

Europeans, you need to grow up. How you come to terms with your inferiority complex is for you to work out.

But, please, work on it. Global peace depends on it.

Sikhism & Chakras: Kundalini & Yogi Harbhajan Singh

In my book ‘Mischievous Mystic’ (considered too contentious for publication), I indicate how many a chakra is ignored in favour of a normativised acceptance of, and reference to, only seven of them.

NOTE: Mischievous Mystic is an account of my life.  I detail how, born with ESP I soon learned to button my lip lest I received an open-palm smack across the face; and how ESP was developed, and of a future where ‘human hybrids’ will devastate humanity as we know it. The book is hard hitting, however, about the current European Empire and its psychopathic nature…not nice reading if you happen to be  race European, thus it is considered unpublishable.

To begin with, please remember, as I am constantly at pains to remind everyone, that Awareness is Complex, Confusing, and Contradictory. This triumvirate reality is assimilated from birth as a result of ongoing awakening from previous births. It can’t be spoon-fed.

Okay, so let’s get some of the ambivalent, Machiavellian, pseudo-philosophical adjunct debate cooked in an oven of over-imagination where fertile masterpieces are baked in wishful brothels built on out-of-the-way piety fantasy, totally out of the way.

Chakras are not a ganglion, nor are they a junction point, nor an area where several of the physical pathways and routes congregate or coexist.

Let me explain. Ask an amputee, even years after the amputation, as to how often they get an itch at some point along the length of the nonexistent limb. They will tell you that it happens, and happens quite often, in some individuals. While nothing physical exists, however, they still feel an itch, and at times they actually itch the point where they feel the sensation.

Now let’s bring this around to ancient Arya Vedic knowledge, which details the following:

Each bio-system has multitude of bio-signature-frames…inaccurately termed ‘subtle bodies’ (more about that another day) overlapping and interwoven into and onto the actual physical bio-frame. Each of these bodies is a separate independent bio-signature with its own mind, in which resides its thoughts. These thoughts are separate from the thoughts of the physical frame. For example, after a heart transplant, the thoughts of the recipient also change, because now he has two currents of thoughts co-existing. And in the same manner where brain transplants have also become a normal procedure – although all that will need realigning in that case is to put names to pictures of relatives and close associates for the bio-system to have points of reference – two currents of thoughts will co-exist.

In that situation (brain transplant) the sum total of thoughts will change somewhat, and will seem more profound than the change of thoughts after a heart transplant. People assume that a brain transplant will radically alter all thoughts. No, that will not happen because thoughts are the sum total of a relationship of all the other organs of any given bio-frame working in cooperation. Thus, a new brain will have only a small spectrum within which to operate out of sync, as the very spectrum it has to operate in is controlled automatically by the unifying energy of all the organs of a given bio-frame.

The same principle governs the function and interplay of chakra ‘energy’ to its physical relative.

Chakras are an independent entity and thought system; not an energy per se. This system, where it intersects the bio-frame causes a flux. The points where the sensation is felt is at the bio-intersection of nerves, blood vessels, and glands. If one surgically removed the gland and the nerves at this point a sensation would still register, due to the impact this interaction has on the local cells and blood vessels. The resultant wave of this contact is felt by the nerves along the blood vessels and the blood, right into the heart, the brain and the rest of the body. And don’t forget each cell has at least seventy thousand working parts to it; and each cell and its parts have their own consciousnesses.

The point that is misunderstood and needs correcting is that the chakra interaction is not an output of an impulse by the glands’ interaction with the nerves and blood vessels of the gland itself. Furthermore, what is not openly understood is that the chakras exist outside, surrounding, the body. Thus, simultaneously, the chakras exist internally and externally to a given bio-system; they exist in the frontal aspect of a body, as well as in the back, legs and arms, and of course (as well documented) along the pathways of the spine.

The much published and gleefully consumed information about the seven chakras housed along the spine in ascending order is the stuff that most people assume to be the sum total of the chakras. Thus, we have the base chakra at the base of the spine. The second chakra is located on the spine opposite the navel. The third is opposite the point, below the diaphragm, where the front of the rib cage terminates. The fourth is behind the point where the heart is located. The fifth is at the bottom of the neck, behind the base of the throat. The sixth is towards the middle of the head at the level corresponding to the point between eyebrows and ears. The seventh is the dip, the indentation, at the top of the head.

And then comes the Marie Antoinette of the chakras: the irresistible and misunderstood Kundalini chakra. Often spoken of in hushed terms, and usually by the holier-than-thou chakra hijackers possessing little knowledge and over-inflated glossy-magazine cover sense of their ‘are you out there’ astral ability, is the eighth chakra. It is located at the lowest point of the trunk of the body – difficult for men to find, but much easier to ascertain in the female anatomy. Two centimeters above, internally, the area between the anus and vagina is this cashmere jewel-bedecked cipher of misinformation, pathological reverence for which sways between God-like status and that of the Devil’s playful mistress.

The kundalini chakra and its energy impulse has a unique pathway totally independent of the spinal dual-carriageway. Yes, it does interplay with the spinal motorway, but it has its own path. This energy has a direct influence and affects the heart, as well as the seventh chakra based midway in the head/brain area. Screw this chakra and you’ve well and truly screwed the emotional tide as well as the rhythm of the heart. This is one chakra you do not touch nor interfere with under any circumstances, at all. It has its own governance and operates best if left alone.

The kundalini chakra is the counter-balance mechanism to the main physically-based chakra expressions. You can mess with the other chakras to a point, because they will be brought under reasonable control by this mechanism without your knowledge. But start messing with the masterpiece that is the kundalini chakra… and you’ve had it. We from our level do not touch this mechanism. If held in respect, this chakra has the capacity to control the severity of a heart attack (though a genetically unbalanced kundalini chakra is, it must be pointed out, incapable of doing so).

The kundalini chakra is a little beauty, and must be left to her own devices.

A Buddhism/Hinduism chakra interlude:

The Buddhist chakra system had to succumb to the prevailing Vedic formulation several centuries after Buddhaji had initially cleared the air about chakras (some six centuries before the attributed time of birth of Jesus). About a century and a half after the formation of Sikhism, Hinduism was formally established. Hinduism was a creation made to encompass varieties of Vedantic rite, ritual and knowledge practiced in the countries and princely states of the old Aryadesh and comprising India, Pakistan and Afghanistan, in order to bring a coherence that might be easily grasped by the nonplussed British colonialists.

Each of these Aryadesh countries and states also had their own language; so a common language was established too in an approximate amalgamation of the variety of words and idioms strewn across northern India. The language, Hindi, was that of everyday commerce and interaction, the slang of its time. It was not the language of a religion, taken nowadays to be Hinduism, but an aspect of what Hindiusm really was and is: a culturally-respectful vehicle of commonality, a paean to the fact and reality of pluralism. And yet, in the very process of its rising collective presence, bringing several hundred million of people together, Hinduism gained supremacy; and overpowered much of what it originally sought to respectfully amalgamate.

Such too had been the experience of Buddhism a long time ago: piqued by its desire to bring together disparate and valuable kingdoms of thought across Aryadesh, and consequently led to subsume the same, until they and it were diluted into a one-size-fits-all symmetry. Thus was Buddhaji’s clarity about the chakras lost, leaving varieties of Buddhism across the globe each as different as the taste of the water from these regions.

Nothing remains pure for long.

Sikhism and chakras:

In Hinduism, the root chakra at the base of the spine is the initial power that has to be ‘energised’. Then the same process is repeated as one moves higher up the spine. At the point of the heart chakra, one has attained the level of an advanced Sant and Svami. Then at the ‘mastery’ of the throat chakra one has advanced in to uber-refined awareness, although the journey carries on.

Purity and unconditional detachment, as well as being able to see the oneness of the Creator’s presence throughout the physical world, are the minimum abilities one has to have mastered, in the absolute, in order to deal with the material world; and this is usually only accessible to the very advanced. And in fact, once the throat chakra has been mastered, (actually, it is not mastered but assimilated with), one seldom interacts with the material world of people.

However, a title conferred by a very ancient language for one who permanently resides and functions from the throat chakra while simultaneously interacting with the secular world is that of ‘Sikh’. So, Sikh is a person who has successfully assimilated the throat chakra and does not dilutes its principles in dealing with the secular world.

Guru Nanakdevji, who rejuvenated and refreshed an ancient truth dove-tailing it into the prevailing modernity, set this high standard as the minimum entry point for any who wished to follow and expound his teaching; with utmost humbleness the prerequisite to even being considered entry, for one is still learning, one is a student of the art; but it is a complete misnomer to regard a Sikh as a naïve learner placed on the bottom rung of the ladder.

Having said that, it is equally wrong to assume that having been born to parents who practice and attain the status of Sikhi one is de facto also a Sikh. As a secular everyday person, even a religious one, a person cannot in an absolute sense be born into Sikhism. You attain Sikhism through advancement of awareness. Only Guru Nanakdevji was born as a Sikh, others had to be ordained into it.

How Sikhism differs with respect to the chakras is in its enunciation, in the common everyday prayers detailed by Guru Nanakdevji, of twenty five chakras – of which the throat chakra (whose attainment usually signals the topmost achievement by some, and is accompanied by their retreat from the material world) is merely the first. To become Sikh one must traverse through, and assimilate with, all twenty five before attaining the right to trip the light fantastic permanently.

To add further complexity to this – where we’ve gone from identifying seven chakras, to adding the kundalini chakra, before pointing to the existence of twenty-five actual chakras – is a little-known fact (or at least one not shared with the masses): each chakra comprises its own multilayered existence. Some have four, others have eight or nine, while others have eighteen. You will fall down the scale of any given chakra if you fail to operate within the very detailed layers comprising each chakra. Each chakra has its own regulatory thought and administration centre. Each chakra has the authority to fail your progress and thus downgrade your access to refined Awareness. I will share more of the detail of this environment in a subsequent post.

Guys, this stuff is not easy as it first sounded when work began at the base chakra.

For ordinarywallahas, the Hindu chakra system is a must that they have to master. For a Sikh the journey of self-discovery only truly begins from the throat chakra. Having said which, one cannot just begin a journey of self discovery from any but the lowest most chakra that your given bio-signature is designed for…and mess up the chakra system, and Dame Kundalini will mess you up good and proper in turn.

Thus, the Sikh chakra system doesn’t in fact differ from the original system clarified by Buddhaji. Though in current times there is a sense of the Sikh chakra system as a tentacle of Hinduism, as diluted by the latter’s own simplicity.

Sikhism & Kundalini:

Yogi Harbhajan Singh found fame in California teaching kundalini to those who had self importance embedded in them as a racial trait. They in turn now teach kundalini yoga with all the misplaced pomp of buying a must-have classic parfum over the counter of a Parisian boutique counter situated in the middle of the Gobi desert. It is both sad and utterly wrong. These people may be, and in fact are, fellow practicing Sikhs, but they are wrong; no matter how much I must respect their defence and claims to being right.

The point they have missed is that humbleness is a prerequisite to assimilating even the base chakra with one’s bio-frame, let alone the other chakras. You can’t assume that you’ve been chosen to teach the world, and then speak of kundalini awakening in the same breath! No way guys, no way.

Now let me make sense of this drama.

A negative into a positive:

Yogi Harbhajan Singhji had a role to play in the scheme of things. Consciously he did not know he had this role nor what it was: he simply went about teaching about kundalini chakra so that others in turn, non-Asian Sikhs, would go forth and spread that teaching. But his role, and a crucial one at that, was to initiate arrogance into self analysis. Why? Because only arrogance can challenge arrogance.

Now, I have steadfastly maintained that North and South America, Australia, New Zealand and Tasmania have to be freed from the European Empire. The Europeans have to hand these lands back to their original inhabitants. The arguments and the policy needed to revert to rightful ownership cannot be achieved by the Asian or African race thought paradigms.

It can only be achieved by the Sikhs who follow Yogi Harbhajan Singhji’s teaching. An Asian following his teaching will fail. It requires a mentality steeped in visual Sikhism, as are his followers, who have the mental dexterity to argue points with the European Empire’s masters from a race-thought paradigm consonant with their own.

This is why I am forever at pains to remind my listeners that advancing and advanced Awareness isn’t a simple matter but is in fact shrouded and grounded in the Trinity of Contradiction, Confusion and Complication.

Kundalini is wrong yoga. However, to free the occupied lands from the European Empire requires the raising of the kundalini. A prime example of Trinity C in operation.

Finally, a note to Asian Sikhs:

To all my fellow Asian Sikhs the world over, I share the following. In the early 1980s you belittled me when I contacted you about teaching yoga from Gurdwaras. Nowadays you are falling head over heels teaching not just yoga but the dangerous kundalini yoga at that.

Today, I invite you to consider the following statement; “You have to earn the right to practice Sikhism, and then after that earn the privilege of becoming a Khalsa. Simply born into a practicing Sikh family does not make you a Sikh. You have to live the code of Sikhism daily, moment by moment. Can you? Sikhism’s yoga starts from the throat chakra. Did you even know that? My fellow Sikhs, please, do not dilute the privilege of Sikhism by repackaging it into the lesser frameworks of secular rules and rites. Please don’t do that. I can only ask, and I have asked. The rest is up to you.”

One of the responsibilities required to be a Sikh is to acquire detailed education about each and every religious scripture, preferably in their mother tongue. Then comes the responsibility to correct aberrations practiced by the faithful of those religions, without demeaning them. The authority of this responsibility has to be exercised with due cultural care and respect. All this is just one of several ‘duties’ you have to have mastered.

Being a Sikh is not only about standing out in the crowd wearing the 5 Ks.

It is a damn sight more than that.

Trophy Wife

Nothing infuriates cultures, societies and communities more than drug use within their circle or when an outsider from another racial, social, lower-economic group, religious or dharmic background wades in and charms the attractive, desirable, marriageable girl to marry him and convert to his faith group and bring up ‘her’ children in his faith.

It amuses those of my background that a family whose structure is steeped in rite and ritual (religion) or conducted according to the edicts of one’s faith should foam at the mouth when a girl hailing from their community elopes with, or with the support of her parent/s marries, her amour from another faith and follows his tradition.

If all faiths are identical (a red herring ever there was one), then why the knee-jerk sense of loss of ‘respect’? Should you not be pleased that your daughter has left one faith and is now following another faith with greater fervour than she did her own?

There is an art to, and an equal amount of violence in, the practice of religion and dharma. At a religious level, violence constitutes hands-on murder of those who fail to mimic your own religion; at a dharmic level, it is less overt, more sly.

Commonsense takes a vacation and the fervently devout are consumed by a need for vengeance at any cost. But Why?

Philosophically and historically, societies at the apex of materialistic grandeur have a reasonably relaxed attitude towards interracial, intercultural, and interreligious unions. Aryadesh exercised it. So did sub-Saharan Africa, China and the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans. Now the western world is experimenting with such tolerance. And it is not by some elitist reverse-engineering of mentally retarded notions that such tolerance is allowed.

The basic cause of tolerance and respect of inter-group alliances centres on accumulation of personal wealth. When the masses enjoy a very high standard of material life, their obeisance to the dictates of rite and ritual becomes a lesser priority. But take away the veneer of wealth and the feel-good factor it connotes, and notions of social and communal ‘respect’ become the arbiter of self-esteem and prestige.

If from the apex society a suitor wooed a woman from the financially challenged community, then, somehow, the proposal is accepted in relative terms by both sides. However if the suitor happens from  an equal financial community, but of course from an outside faith, then the pain of this union by the girls parents and family is registered in suicidal and vengeance terms, where eye, tooth and life are bartered as if one was at a market buying ones daily ration.

So far, I have focused on the reaction of the ‘victim’ of this cultural insult. Now let me turn the tables on the suitor.

It is seen and enough evidence exists about how ‘high’ an African-American feels landing a European woman as his wife. Regardless of his commercial status, the happy, buzzing, high-heel kicks seldom leave his face, or his peacock walk. The sense of having pulled a master stroke and beguiled the European race and community by winning the affection and love of a European woman seldom leaves his or his communitys’ sense of attaining the unattainable.

However, we read in newspapers the sorry mess that the African-American pop singer Diana Ross had to endure at the hands of the Norwegian shipping magnet’s family whose son chose to marry her instead of a blonde blue-eyed Scandinavian woman.

It seems that if the rich marry ‘beneath’ their racial station then the knives are out for the couple. Yet, the same marriage seen from the racially ‘inferior’ party is viewed as payback for the horrors of centuries of subjugation.

Now, into this mix let us bring the motives of established Indian movie ‘studs’, of whom the vast majority are Muslim, while their partners are invariably from non-Muslim traditions. So, why, when more Muslims live in India than in Pakistan, do these Muslim movie ‘studs’ chase, woo and seduce non-Muslim women?

Is it that by doing so they will enter heaven and be overwhelmed by virgins for the rest of their stay?!

In any case, what is the duration of this heavenly vacation? And what happens to the virgin once deflowered? Is she rejected while he moves on to the next virgin in the queue and so on and so forth? And if heaven truly is heaven, presumably there’s no place for unclean things like blood – so do the virgins soil the sheets and are these hung out to attest to her former virginal state? Is the deed done in the heavenly home, and if so, surely its overcrowded with ancestral males involved in an endless conveyor belt of deflowering virgins. And Muslim women who enter heaven – what is their celestial reward: virgin males with bulging biceps and six-packs?

As I have maintained all my life, I have yet to meet ‘God’. So I seek education in this matter from those who lack my abilities, yet who are somehow more accurately able to state what goes on in Muslim heaven.

So, back to Muslim Bollywood movie stars and ‘studs’ – God’s gift to women and seemingly too good for Muslim women.

Why?

Why do these men invariably choose a non-Muslim woman?

Because esteem and wellness accrue from finally being allowed to sit at the high table. Self-respect and self-worth are measured in the ability to chase, woo and marry a non-Muslim Indian citizen. In ordinary life, in the realm of inter-religious marriages that I observe, the most sought-after liaison is with a Sikh partner. Male or female. Among the Sikh men who marry Muslim women, they always consider themselves to be married to a Sikh woman and there is none of the fanfare and shouting from rooftops at having converted a girl to your religion as is the case so often among Muslim men marrying actual Sikh girls.

Sikhs treat their inter-religious marriages as normal Sikh marriages. They never try to radicalise the girl or convert her or her offspring. They marry the people they love and go quietly about their business, believing the union is established by a higher order – nothing more, nothing less. The very opposite is true of Muslims – they mire their wives in emotional turmoil, impelling them to convert, to use a Muslim name and to denounce their origins and heritage.

One day, and I know this day will come: Islamic people will wake up and behave like the tolerant faith they really are.

Honour Killing

Honour killing is an emotionally fuelled sacrosanct ideal, and is meant to define human ethos, ethics, conduct, sensibilities and sensitivities.

To understand honour killing, as opposed to honourable death, heterosexual men have to attend gay bars on their own, get friendly with the patrons, accept their advances, agree to accompany them to a private party where several of the person’s associates are present, then be physically overwhelmed when he refuses to engage in one-on-one sex, then be brutally – and against his wishes – repeatedly anally and orally raped.

Now, how many of you men are prepared to go through the rest of your life reliving your powerlessness over the incident and believe that you have the ability to detach yourself, forgive the perpetrators, and even forget the entire episode.

Now, let us open another thought-window…

You are lying anaesthetised on an operating table. The incision begins. To your horror, you feel each and every cut. But you’re unable to move or physically register an objection to the continuing cut of the knife. Can’t imagine how that might feel? Ask somebody to stab you repeatedly with a pin in various parts of your body – as the pin punctures your skin, remain passive and totally unresponsive.

Can you do that?

Now, let’s add another layer to this, specifically, the Asian and European mindscapes.

Until the mid c.20th, the concept of Judgement Day and the idea of life after death were realities. As personal wealth increased among the European grassroots, these cherished centuries old ideals along with that of an all-seeing judgemental God dissipated; and life was theorised and lived as if it were all about the here-and-now, and that after death came nothing.

This mindscape is the ground-zero of modern psychology. And it is based on the experience of American GIs in Vietnam. During that war the American soldiers on one hand were happily ensconced in their helicopters engaged in shooting defenceless people on the ground; on the other hand, when at the receiving end of firepower they experienced fear of death in terms of a fear of no return.

Where did this reimagining of death emerge from?

The live-for-now attitude was forged in the challenge to such unwritten social rules as respect for elders. Rebel Without A Cause was accepted not as mere silver screen entertainment but as the motto, the cornerstone, the edict, the demigod of a new society. Children were rent asunder from the multi-generational living mode, away from the guidance and interaction of their grandparents. They were brought up by people who were child-adults themselves and who had zero experience in child-rearing, and who now no longer had the stability and vision of their own parents’ experience to lean on.

Parents adopted a radical modernity, granting unfettered freedom to their children; and the latter, once set free, set about defining their own parameters. Freedom engaged sexual revolution in the 1960s, and chucked out the foundations of the European psyche whereby socially-inept and sexually-frustrated religious practitioners chastised their flock for success in these arenas. Sexual freedom did away with the wrath of God, and focused on the here and now, on the belief that you only live once and ought therefore to live it to the full.

This ‘new thinking’ rewrote psychology, adjusting and readjusting Freudianism. At its core was the near-death experience of American GIs, whose fear was turned into a euphoria about this one and only life and was then rammed down the throats of a new generation – not only in America but globally. One vogue came to replace another; one idiotic idea displaced another – freedom wrapped in fear became the psychology of the day.

Opposing this psychology is the one cherished by nearly all non-Europeans as an absolute truth. It is that one’s actions here and now are like a bank account in which passive, caring, humane behaviour accumulates positive points which are then bartered for an easier, healthier, wealthier, trouble-free human cycle next time around.

Within this non-European mindscape there is more emphasis on life lived within extant social parameters, these latter being the arbiter of retribution, punishment and boon for one’s actions that will be the net characteristic of one’s next life – unless your actions are so heinous that your next lives will follow the life-pattern and template of animals rather than humans.

This mindscape is based on Buddhaji, who detailed the journey of his ‘life’ from human form into various plant and animal forms, and eventually into human form again – the accumulated experience of which allowed him the attainment of enlightenment. Since others of Buddhaji’s level have described similar journeys, this template of existence is embedded in the non-European psyche as an absolute.

Within this journey, various hierarchical realities exist; there are no black and white life-patterns, all is interlinked and interwoven. The higher levels correspond to social and ethical behaviour, the lower ones to shame and failure of discipline individually or among one’s family.

A soldier who follows orders is honoured. A soldier who disobeys orders brings shame on his regiment. This shame is not dishonour – both are as different from one another as the truth is to a lie, as sunlight is to moonlight.

Shame is shame. It stands on its own merit.

So, where does honour killing fit into all this? Well, it emerges from, and belongs to, yet another mindscape altogether.

Very few people in the world experience the reality-emotion of living death – that space where you are alive inasmuch as the body continues to function, but you are intellectually and rationally dead; where you are clinically alive but psychically dead. To experience living death is to be a walking corpse.

In living death all that registers in one’s mind is that an aberration of correctness has taken place; and that if left unchecked it will reproduce that aberration, unless and until the anomaly is reset. Assuming that you will take birth as maybe the third but definitely the fourth generation of the same lineage and family means that the original aberration – the state of functioning outside accepted social parameters – will pursue you into that lifetime.

You then have to ask yourself the very serious question of whether you want to be born as an ostracised member of your community, generations along, and where nobody wants to deal with you or marry you or be connected with your family.

The reality of such isolation, coupled with being a living corpse, is what compels the act of what I call resetting the anomaly. Hence, honour killing.

I should state here that I have deeply personal problems with this reaction. My deeply ingrained Sikh mysticism and ethos lead me to reject the notion that the anomaly leading to the aberration of correctness is the fault of the woman involved.

In this world of male dominance a woman – even in the European world – is answerable to the man in her life. It is the man who chases the woman of his desire; the man who is the aggressor and pursuer, refusing to accept the woman’s rejection (which normally she withholds for the sake of a peaceful life), and coercing her into an act which when it comes into the open light of society creates the state of living corpse – usually in the woman’s father.

This living corpse state and mentality has no remedy. Time does not heal the pain; it is so deep, so thorough, that words cannot explain it. As an old-fashioned Sikh I am adamant that if you must kill the woman who has been compromised and coerced, then the man responsible must first be killed by his own family. If they refuse, then there can be no basis for killing the woman either.

But the question remains, how easy is it to relive, again and again, the horror of being violently gang-raped?

Imagine that the rape lasts several hours, includes physical beatings beyond any measurable threshold, and is committed on a public stage with your local neighbours taking part in your humiliation. How do you live in society, being mocked and verbally humiliated on a daily basis by all and sundry?

If you had an opportunity to kill the protagonist(s), would you really let them off the hook?

Folks, there is no such thing as honour killing.

A living corpse has neither a sense of honour or shame.

So, to those of you who are among the heterosexual men I addressed at the beginning, I now ask: where do you stand on the inappropriately termed honour killing?

Seva

In this post, I seek to explain how the human world divides into distinct bio-structural groups and what this means for nishkam seva (selfless activity).

One group, mature advanced consciousness (MAC), has a fully-developed and active organ-mechanism to permit inner awakening. The other, egocentric consciousness (ECC) has a hibernating organ-mechanism which acts to inhibit attunement with advanced awareness.

Mechanically, both bio-structural groups can engage in selfless activity. However, having lived in the UK for fifty years, I can attest to the fact that in the ECC group this manifests as a passing fad – albeit committedly undertaken – that doesn’t endure over the longue duree and is not saturated with selfless-consciousness.

There is, for the ECC, instead a wariness about being pushed beyond one’s limits of selflessness – a self-preservation consciousness that draws the line in order not to be taken advantage of – and it’s there to see in the eyes and body language of European converts to Sikhism and Hinduism.

Among the MAC group, selflessness is not conditional. It is intuitive, innate, natural, humble service. Whereas the ECC regards parents as birthing pods to be discarded or farmed out when they hit old age and infirmity, deference to parents and elders is part-and-parcel of the MAC bio-signature. The selflessness that European converts undertake with all manner of caveats is, for the Sikhs and Hindus a privilege.

Nishkam seva used to be relished by the Indians of Britain. Lately, though, I’ve noticed a soiling, a weakening, a creeping impurification of this purest of activities in the minds of those doing selfless service.

MACs are becoming ECCs.Why?

Well, one reason is the proliferation of a media culture, bulwarked by right-wing devotees, and entombed in right-wing discourse that fosters and projects a form of thought graffiti that creates factional high-mindedness. Hence, supreme truth is sacrificed at the altar of cultural hierarchy, incarcerated by rigidly demarcated and authorised versions of reality that invite scepticism about the apparently unattainable and outdated dreams of our elders.

So accelerated is the contamination of nishkam seva among Sikhs that they now conduct it with fear, serving gur-langar (blessed food) – in the Gurdwara kitchens, to anybody who wishes to partake of the wholesome free food – as if those they serve have a contagious disease.

Where once valiant Sikhs stood fearless in the face of physical violence or black-magic operators, such fear is unbelievable. Where once, anybody who came to the langar hall was served with openheartedness, nowadays I witness gur-langar being served with selective openness, rather than with the abiding consciousness that all are equal in the eyes of God – and it is cowardly.

Seva has historically been linked with karamjôg (jôg in Panjabi is a higher state than Sankrit’s yôgā); karamjôg denoting an interaction wherein one’s humility and selfless service provide a mental opportunity to remain actively egoless for a certain period of time, and to thereby help lose the egotistical weight gained in one’s everyday interactions with others

This type of activity was sought after and actively enjoyed, and people had to await their chance to cleanse their own negativity. The more demeaning an activity one engaged with egoless attention during seva, the greater the burden of negativity one was able to neutralise and cancel.

Unfortunately, the Europeanised Asians, now well into their retirement, are steeped in fear of the same unknown that Sikhs used to tackle with ease and fearlessness. Lacking practical guidance from seasoned ESP-able Beings has created an argument in their minds against the rightfulness and deep sincerity of seva. How sad.

Those who are ESP-able, like myself, are hounded on a daily basis and viewed with suspicion, aided and abetted by the cowardly occupiers of positions of power within the Sikh faith – who lay claim to advanced awareness (Sant), yet cannot dig deeper than the regurgitated Gur-stories in their claim to fame.

Ask them for deeper clarity about ESP and the higher layers of consciousness and they are left floundering for answers. Having said that they are doing a sterling job in containing and guiding the masses, teaching them the rituals and rites fundamental to gaining entry into the advanced realms, and which must be mastered faithfully decade after decade before one can be inducted into deeper thought and teaching.

Until that happens, deeply sincere and humble selfless seva have to be engaged in as often as possible, week in and week out. Doing seva while also passing judgement on those about whom you hear salacious stories being passed around the community is to effectively relinquish your opportunity of inner cleansing, and the egotistical weight piles back on.

And additionally, something which is not explained widely enough, is that in judging another person you secure a connection whereby you suck their negativity of their psyche into your own psyche, which as you interact with your nearest and dearest becomes shared amongst your dearly beloved.

Any place of worship is an opportunity to cleanse one’s negativity by focusing on your own faults without sitting in judgement over whoever enters your eyesight or your wandering mind.

Non-judgement. That is the first type of seva.

The second type of seva is active participation in the operation of your chosen place of worship, without seeking the limelight or applause. Simply go and help. Let others, who are stupid enough to seek adulation and status and power, hand out orders.

The opportunity for sincere humble service is theirs too, and if they choose to ignore or discard that opportunity, so be it. For your part, just be grateful that you have an opportunity to step back from day’s hard toil and to reenergize your battery of purity and positivity.

As for the ECCs – I am determined to help the race Europeans (for that is whom the ECC references primarily) seek and find the trigger point for activating their participation in inner awakening. I know that I will fail. But I shall never give up trying or hoping that I will succeed in this endeavour.

To the MACs – well, please do not give up hope. You are on the right track. The journey is very long indeed, but it has an end. And you will be surprised what awaits you at the end… and they say God does not have a sense of humour?! Just you wait and see.

 

Sikh Mystic

Sikhs are caught in a strange paradox. A paradox without parallel in their history. They are hurtling towards a pattern of behaviour inimical to their very being; where once they lived not merely in alignment with, but expansively beyond, the samurai code which Takaharo Kitamura defines thus:

“The samurai must maintain his faith in his beliefs, even as the social or political climate shifts and alters. He must be patient, must act in a manner that may at times seem irrational or illogical, must resist the temptation of instant gratification, and must work towards fulfilling what may seem to be an impossible idea. As a result, the samurai is often sometimes an outsider, a rebellious figure because he refuses to conform to the habits of the day.”

Whence the stupendous fall from grace of the Sikh mystic? Why are Sikhs going, not into the mystic, but resolutely away from it? To answer this question, we need to explore the death of Sikh humanity – that quality of being humane and benevolent, of eschewing judgement in favour of empathy. Okay, ‘death’ may be a tad overwrought – but certainly Sikh humanity defined in this way has entered a period of ruination equally ruinous to the existence of the Sikh mystic.

Now, I have absolute empathy with that age when PhDs were conferred only once a student had accomplished mastery of, and successfully defended their theses on, no fewer than eight subjects. An age when PhDs were attained well beyond the age of 40. Today of course, entry into just one PhD programme is difficult enough, and mastering just the one subject is a life-consuming venture for four years or more. – but to master eight subjects?! I’ve nothing but admiration for that kind of feat – a norm among PhD students in a long-ago age, and one in which the Indian universities excelled, welcoming students from across the world.

What the Sikh mystic did however, was to extend the scholarly curriculum, to revolutionise the armchair-debating speciality of Aryadesh’s scholars and the subject-focused study of their research students. Sikh mysticism deepened the scope of education and expertise, integrated this to extend to body as well as mind. Thus, while an erstwhile research subject included mastery of war – Sikh mysticism required that this have a physical component, a practical counterpart to learning about strategy and tactics. It was a radical departure from a theory-only curriculum, and from the kind of mystic enquiry that limited itself to fathoming the unseen – Sikh mysticism brought to the table a pragmatic imperative; knowledge for the sake of dealing with life’s everyday problems.

If pragmatics had been valued enough, it’s possible that the morning on which the Mohammedans (the original name of followers of Islam) conquered north-west Aryadesh for the umpteenth time might never have come to pass. Indeed, one young mystic – following a householder’s lifestyle rather than that of a recluse or ivory-tower theoretician – pleaded with his senior mystics that they take a physical role in defending and repulsing the invading army. The response was along the lines of “We will sit and meditate, and materialise a sheet of mirror to confront and blind the invading army as it marches across the desert along the north-western frontier.” Meditation did not transform sand into a mirror with blinding properties. North-west Aryadesh was conquered.

And the young mystic? He is now known universally as Guru Nanakdevji. The founder and first guru of the Sikhs. (I’ll write more about what a guru is in a future post).

Guru Nanakdevji was a reformer. He jettisoned reliance on subjective and ethereal knowledge alone. He believed that the human world would be governed by those who master technology – which is where this sentence ends from the European (including American) perspective – and harness it for the benefit of people, animals and the environment. This is written into the Sri Guru Granth Sahibji, along with other of his observations, such as the imperative of strenuously tackling, confronting and improving circumstances to effect a more balanced state rather than meekly accepting karma.

The ‘knowledge-and-action’ based humanity of Guru Nanakdevji thrived through the other nine progressive Sikh Gurus. Hence, pragmatics – Guru Ramdassji (the fourth Guru) encouraged horsemanship as well as the mastering and carrying of arms, in a legal environment forbidding this – shared the limelight with scholarly pursuit.

Consequently, Sikhs were not exactly flavour of the day. Challenging ages-old traditions of Vedantic and Vedic philosophy, with their mass following and off-the-mark translations of Sanskrit scriptures (before Hinduism came to encompass everything in a hazy amorphous mass), was – and this is too often understated if explored at all –unpalatable to the mystical elite.

Yet, as with all reformist movements, the earliest adherents to Sikh mysticism comprised disaffected scholars and elites from within the ruling but increasingly defunct system – the rationality of their argument in favour of Guru Nanakdevji attracting more followers in turn. Yet, Guru Nanakdevji’s wasn’t Aryadesh’s first reformist movement by any stretch of the imagination – Bhagat Kabir and several others before him had tried and failed. What marked Guru Nanakdevji out was his born-enlightenment quality – that advanced divine awareness of his that came from birth, and gave him absolute abilities in exposing weak arguments and won him acclaim within the highest echelons of the Divine community of his age.

To put this into context, Gautaum Buddha was a self-enlightened; while Jesus of Nazareth and Mohammed of Makkah were taught-enlightened. At a pedestrian level, these strata of enlightenment are unseen, exchangeable with and inextricable from each other – what is necessary is to extrapolate the individuals involved; at an advanced spiritual level, the enlightenment forms are distinguishable but understood to more importantly comprise part of a cosmic continuum in which the bio-signatures of the individual are irrelevant categorizations.

So, we have a born-enlightened reformer espousing knowledge-action based humanity that integrates mental acuity, physical prowess, and pragmatic action – a figure in the form of Guru Nanakdevji who is a superior dialectician, unraveling the confusions of the Vedic norms and the ambiguities of the Mohammedan edicts, and joined by many an interlocutor won over by the rationality of his equal and balanced lifestyle argument.

And while this followership expanded to the masses, the source of Sikh mysticism’s initial attraction was the elites – the educated. (This social constructivist basis of group identity is well-documented within anthropological research – including the role of elites in setting the agenda, and articulating the symbols and ideology that attract the masses into believing, or in this instance cleaving to reform).

To a huge degree, however, Sikh mysticism was its own PR. It’s access to, and explanatory value and practical importance for Aryadesh’s lay population, came at the moment of its unveiling on the global stage – when Guru Gobind Raiji presented the Mystic-Warrior Sikhs formally at Vaisakhi at Anandpur Sahib and thence was baptised under their auspices as Guru Gobind Singhji.

But it also came in response to the Sikh mystics’ successes in battle – those demonstrations of power and prowess that speak volumes to a mass population excluded from the exercise of esoteric knowledge that is the elite’s domain. Mohammedan warriors sought out Sikh mystics in battle in order to die at their hands, such was the blessing and aura connoted with being a Sikh mystic.

Together, these attainments combined to attract many fame-seekers, excited by the prospect of the adrenalin of battleground victories and of becoming Sikhs – Singhs – in the process. At its apex Sikh mysticism was venerated as itself being at the apex of all dharmas and religions; and the achievements of the Sikh mystics, ordinary householders who mesmerised the population, were legendary. With the passing of the tenth Guruji, crucial adjustments leveled out the equally crucial distinctions between dharma and religion, and the criteria for becoming a Mystic-Warrior Sikh – the triadic cornerstone of mental acuity, physical prowess, and pragmatics in the service and advancement of humaneness and humanity – were relaxed to an unprecedented level.

Consequently, the baptism ceremony to become a Singh resembles a ‘conversion job-lot’ and I am unyielding in my opposition to this. For me, Singh and Kaur denote, for men and women respectively, “a Sikh mystic who is deeply and thoroughly educated but has chosen a hands-on, warrior-secular lifestyle, committed in their refusal to let truth be humiliated – even if they have to stand alone and must give up their own life in protecting truth” (Avtar).

But what I witness is angry people unable to command their own emotions being encouraged into baptism as Singhs, as if there is a contest to see who can secure the most conversions. And they take place several times a year, year in, year out – across the globe. It’s an absolute nonsense. I would even support the conversion of these manipulated innocents if they were, at the very least, entered into a stream of education that would result in their inner awakening. But they’re not and, so, I shan’t.

Think about it, the criteria for becoming a Singh are: a vegetarian diet, abstinence from alcohol, tobacco and drugs, a promise to wake up early and do two sets of prayers, one in the morning and one in the evening, not cutting their hair and wearing the five kakkars.

You may as well put out a call inviting everybody who’s ever been told by their doctor that for the sake of their health they need to eat a vegetarian diet and give up alcohol, smoking and recreational drugs; and who, on top of that, don’t get around to trimming their hair… convert to being a Singh, you tick most of the boxes already.

If only it were that easy to become a Sikh mystic!

Vegetarianism has always been a mainstay of the Indian diet; keeping hair untrimmed has always been the choice of those seeking inner awareness…these are hardly edicts of an advanced dharma, then, but merely extrapolations of long-held local practices, and not a whole lot to crow about, after all.

Sikh mysticism is a tad more complicated, and yes, I would revert to some strictness about who may take the next step in their inner development with respect to initiating them into Sikh mysticism. Remember the prescriptions of mental acuity (to the level of scholarship), physical prowess, and pragmatic resolution of life’s everyday problems? Entwined with the qualities of humanity – truth, protection, empathy?

In all of this, there is no place for arrogance; and I would strip that out of any wannabe Singh by asking them to précis their knowledge of current scientific and philosophical research; prepare and formally defend doctoral theses on four subjects of their choice; demonstrate recall of all the world scriptures, and be able to extrapolate the theological differences between them. Fail in any, and you fail totally. Please pass “Go”, you don’t have what it takes. You cannot become the Khalsa.

What you actually see happening, however, is open baptism season, accompanied by a lot of venom and anger and utilization of media platforms to see who can shout loudest. Of the oft-quoted Kahlil Gibran phrase “Rest in reason; move with passion”, only the second half seems to resonate and even then without qualification or balance or temperance. And the newly baptised then fragment into social cult groupings, their fealty occurring at the cost almost of Sikh unity.

One inspirational Sikh took a more outlandish path to inner awakening and gained mystical status as a result, only for this acolytes to follow the method without achieving what he had; it was a case of ignoring the interplay between an individual’s bio-signature and the method of self-awareness suited thereto, and thinking that fervently rocking and atonally and loudly repeating a mantra would allow you to reach the heady heights of enlightenment though your bio-signature requires a different method altogether. Ask the acolytes, however, and they will, to a man, deny that they haven’t advanced spiritually.

The mesmerised are never taught the simplest truth of all: which is that you must find what works for you. I can’t emphasise this enough – focus on your aim not on the individual who appears to have reached it.

Few can become mystics. Weakening the pool through mass, emotionally-charged conversion doesn’t help anyone. While there is nothing to fault in the initial fervour of the newly converted, eventually the veneer peels off and they come to see the ultimate aim/objective with the naked and dispassionate eye, and in all its unattainable reality.

For example, almost everybody misses the point of being a warrior: it is to find every conceivable way to get out of a fight. A Mystic-Warrior must first try to create an environment which allows both sides to save face. Only when all attempts at this are rejected does the Mystic-Warrior move into the phase of shielding the weak, protecting the vulnerable, and disarming the aggressor. If the latter raises arms and takes aim, then it is permissible to put them to peaceful rest. A Mystic-Warrior does not sit in judgement, but accepts human frailty and ignores ambition.

Yet, to see the veins practically popping out on the foreheads of the baptised Sikhs, who huddle together on the Sikh television channels here in the West, creating a frenzy of argument and anger, clenching their fists in demand of their wants, substituting freedom of speech for the freedom of thought that is already theirs by right… well, Mystic-Warrior Sikh is not the first description that comes to mind; nor is Sikh, let alone Singh.

There is genuineness in their desire to see justice fulfilled as they regard it, but while admirable, they remain demeaning examples – all too widely emulated – of that which fully and truthfully is the Sikh Mystic-Warrior. As Rumi writes: “It is not thunder that grows flowers, but water.” 

It is nigh on impossible to be a Sikh Mystic – but for all that, it is neither unattainable nor unlivable as a lifestyle.

Sex: Sufi Svami Sant Sikhi

Sex. If sex were only a mistress, women would remain celibate and function only as child bearing incubators. However, sex is not a beguiling mistress. Sex is a life force with a viable right to exist, albeit within the boundaries of chemical reactions laced with emotions of belonging and ownership.

Yet, when we envelop and dovetail sex with ‘love’ we create a paradox; more so, even, when the love-construct of sex is considered in relation to the Leading Lights of a faith – with the ordinarywallahs, themselves utterly lost as how best to deal with the raging chemical-reaction battle of the sex/love conundrum, coming to sit in summary judgement over those Leading Lights.

Why is it that humans initially idolise and segment Leading Lights from the normally accepted parameters of society, positioning them as beyond such parameters, only to then demonise them for not adhering to the parameters? Why have we put sex and lovemaking out of reach of the very ethos of faith, as being somehow against the teaching at ‘God’s Education Institution’.

If lovemaking and sex did not exist then none of the great Messengers, Prophets and Gurus could not have taken human birth. I have yet to hear from them in person, and I am still waiting to find out if their birth was indeed super-normal and different from the general public. But in the meantime, I have to deal with this matter in a sensible pragmatic way.

Out of all of the Messengers, Prophets and Gurus, only Guru Nanakdevji, originator of the Sikh faith, states in his writing that lovemaking and sex is an acceptable activity to be enjoyed between a couple. He further clarifies that a couple means a life-long (wedded) pair. Nevertheless, ordinary Sikhs and faith-stage-performing Sikhs carry with them a judgmental condemnation of sex and lovemaking, denouncing sexual desire by anyone who is engaged in ‘faith-work’.

If Sikhs can get it so utterly wrong then what hope is there for other faiths in getting it right, faiths whose scriptures aren’t written by their originator but by ordinarywallahs doing their best to capture in writing what they think their originator meant seven hundred years previously.

The most remarkable thing about sex as contained in all the scriptures, besides the Sikh’s Guru Granth Sahibji, is that it is rendered and judged in pretty much the same way as it is in books/writings by educated secular writers with a distaste for sex. You will find very little difference between the leading world scriptures and those secular writers’ distain for sex.

Even the do and don’t of all the other scriptures seem to be human consumer interrelationship laws as seen in practice in the political secular society of law courts.

Thus, faith is denuded of its intricacies, complexities and gracefulness and is borne along by society and its rules. When the two worlds – faith and society – are forced to collide in this way, society’s rules get the upper hand. Thence, confusion as to what a Chen (Zen), Sufi, Svami or Sant can or cannot do in the eyes of the public who seek their advice on demystifying mysticism.

Now, indulge me as I set some formal ground rules about the hierarchy of sex, sexuality and sensuality as observed from those of my background. My opinion is that if the hierarchy is not followed then the whole edifice falls down, collapsing into misunderstanding about sex, sexuality and sensuality.

For all my faults, and I have far more than others, I nevertheless was allowed entry into the higher echelons of advanced awareness. Entry into that environment is encased within a particular responsibility, and only the ‘fieldworker’ elected and entrusted with the duty is allowed formal residency – albeit for a period of sequential events which the fieldworkers oversees like a  project manager. It is from that pedestal and as a part of my fieldwork that I share some of what I am privy to, in the hope that it clarifies certain ambiguities about sex for instance.

As destiny and samskar had detailed – and here is a prime example of the confusion of terminology: initially penned by poets the word ‘karma’ has erroneously displaced ‘samskara’ and modified its import in the process; samskara is the ebb and flow, a reaction to an action; karma is the entire caboodle that governs creation into its four creative states and then the same period of what human awareness considers non-creation; and this one cycle of creation and non-creation is under the governership of one template – a template called karma, within which is another template, specifically samskar.

To return… as destiny and samskar had detailed it, when a High Being entered my life and began his teaching (by what can best be described as osmosis teaching alongside practical discourses), my education about sex evolved.

I was by nature a reasonably gifted dancer. With permission of the High Being, I accompanied older lads who would take me along with them to weekend nightclubs as they knew I would probably be the second best dancer there. A gift which would then allow them access to girls. I disliked the environment and usually found an excuse not to be dragged along. One time, as I was making my excuses, the High Being interceded and indicated that I must accompany the other guys – that there was a lesson I needed to learn and understand.

At some point while we were at the nightclub I saw a large cheering mob gathered, ostensibly hidden away from prying eyes, and I went to investigate. I found a girl worse for wear from drink, being groped and kissed as the boys enjoyed her to their satisfaction. Where they would normally keep to themselves, the English, West Indian and Indian lads – fuelled by drink, hedonism and the free availability of sex – had removed their racial divisions, and one guy after the one took their turn. The girl involved encouraged them all.

The next day the High Being asked me about the incident and my views. I shared my intrigue at how lack of command and control over sexual desire led to deracialised involvement in an activity by a group of boys who wouldn’t otherwise be seen dead together; and by the girl too. So began my education about sex, sexual command and control.

I cannot underline the point enough, that unless a man (and this precludes women) attains full realisation of how to command and control the chemistry involved in sexual desire then advancement into the higher echelons of advanced awareness is impossible. From that pedestal you can indulge in sex almost like an ordinary person, but you do so selectively. In turn, command and control over the chemistry involved in sexual desire cannot be achieved unless the entire package leading to advancement into inner awareness’s refined echelons has been taught and mastered.

At the time, I thought the nightclub incident to be another exercise to sort out the wheat from the chaff among the High Being’s students. This turned out to be partially correct. In my case, and as he had indicated at the outset, my authority in the arena of control would pay for itself as the future unfolded. Those events unfolded when the UK police targeted me, trying to set me up as someone from a high religious status with weak sexual control.

They sent three women my way who would normally never give me a second look, and when each lady cried over the phone about why I did not consider them to be sexually attractive and had refrained from climaxing in their arms, the police who were recording each conversation and incident realised that I was somewhat different from ordinary faith activist.

If I had not mastered sex-desire, whereby I can be engaged in sex but never allow myself to orgasm, the UK police would have ‘outed’ me a long time ago. Thus when I share my views about sex then perhaps I do know a thing or two more about the subject matter than your ordinary ‘experts’.

I need to clarify certain points before I simplify the ongoing message. Advanced Beings, be they female or males, can instigate the process of birth by their sheer thought. But they do need a partner of an equal calibre in order to facilitate the matter. They can also, though more seldomly, instigate a birth for a couple who are desperate for a child.

All of this is conducted under the direct and absolute instructions of Maiea symmetry. She orders and we fulfill that order as per her request. To assume that we can summarily wade in willy-nilly is the height of ignorance; and it is this ignorance that also pens grand commercial novels about wars between the Good and Evil.

No, I cannot emphasis this point enough. Whatever I am, I am due to the permission of the Maiea symmetry. She controls, and nothing functions outside her set parameters. And herein lies the misunderstood teachings. It is from this base I share the following observations – because I am permitted to do so.

Ordinarywallahs make childlike assumptions about how the advanced mystics should act. If they behave within those set perimeters then they are acclaimed as Great Beings. But fall foul of the confused parameters set by secular ignorance, and you are condemned as the Great False Being and are garlanded as a Charlatan.

To gain and cement the title of Charlatan not only must you fall foul of the rigid expectations of sexual activity, but you must also be financially well-off. The oft asked question posed as an observation goes something like this: ‘You are so fortunate(!) that you do not need money…as we living in the world do…’. How precisely do you think spiritual folk and the mystics move around and pays their bills?

If the stupidity of ignorance were set to one side and the Advanced Beings allowed normal life expressions, then you would find that like you they too drink water, eat food and go to the toilet. They have a biological body and a chemically controlled mind-frame. They too want to enjoy whispers of undying love and passion. They too want to behave as normal human beings. The rub is that the unbalanced society in which they have to function does not want them to behave normally. Why not?

Why is it that of two mystics, one who because of some internal chemistry does not engage in sex often and one who for the same reason does, both are sought for consultation but the latter is considered to be of a lower order of mystic knowledge because of his/her greater sexual desire and activity?

Why indeed?

The answer lies is in the idiotic expectations of the ordinarywallahs that those who excel at explaining mysticism must somehow not function as they were created – lest they fall foul of the extraordinary expectations of the ordinarywallahs.

An apple cannot be expected even if covered and encased in the skin of an orange to taste like an orange.

Humans are created out of passion and sex. In that creation they carry the core fundamentals of passion and sex. So when the ordinarywallahs expect the mystics to be supernormal, they the ordinarywallahs have to ask themselves whether the mystic was created by supernormal beings out of thin air, and if not, then they need to expect that High Being to behave within normal human parameters.

If the erroneous pedestal were not created and these ordinary people with ordinary chemistry flowing in their veins were treated as normal people, then the majority of sex abuses by the ‘clergy’ of the Christian faith would not have existed in the numbers that they do.

My sincerest hope is that just because someone has the capacity to demystify mysticism it does not automatically mean that that person does not eat food, drink water and refrain from going to the toilet. That is utter nonsense. Such drivel emanates from people whose expectations are wound up in a fantasy of God as being above sexual and financial intrigue, and who then apply this fantasy to the bio-frame of the individual human being to whom they have gone seeking the demystification of mysticism.

Here I must make another point clear. The foot soldiers of faith, e.g., the clergy within Christianity, have zero ability to demystify mysticism. The ability and responsibility for this resides only at the very top most position of advanced awareness. And these Beings seldom interact with the general public.

So, you need to get real guys.

Another absurdity of the ordinarywallahs is to pray to God – this Ultimate Being who is considered and even demanded to be above sexual and financial intrigue and beyond interracial feuding – to find them their perfect sexual-life partner, fill their bank account to brimming and instigate interethnic peace at the wave of a celestial wand.

It’s like visiting a back street tailor and asking him to fix a small medical problem… say, sewing the hole in your heart!

Get real guys and smell the coffee. Get out of cloud-cuckoo land. Deal with reality, and stop placing Advanced Beings and Mysticism Demystifiers on a pedestal that prevents them from partaking of ‘real’ life – they can do both, you know. They are no less advanced because you ordinarywallahs castigate certain behaviours as sinful – whatever that means.

Please take responsibility for your own behaviour in their company and take full responsibility for your children’s welfare, and remember first and foremost to treat all religious activists as human beings with human feelings, desires and longings.

For they are human first and demystifiers of mysticism second.

Sants, Svamis, Sufis

Everybody it seems is an expert on the boundaries that a leading Dharmic light must confine him- or herself to – but these opinionwalas and their conjectures aren’t ‘expert’ at all, they’re mostly emotion-led attitudes that acquire acceptance by sheer force of everyone else’s emotional musings on what Dharmic responsibility should look like. It is a little known fact that Dharmic hierarchy is very strict and punishes those who transgress or abuse the system.

Opinionwallahs wouldn’t for one minute judge the teachers, lecturers and professors who teach guide, mould and instruct our children. The social condemners know nothing of the sexual orientation, lifestyle, politics, marital status, or position in the education system of these educators. So, why attack the leading Dharmic light who provides succour and teaching to the average person – a person who manages life and its obstacles sufficiently well for themselves yet who seeks some additional comfort?

Why not leave seekers and their preferred Dharmic light alone – leave them to their isolated, self sustaining group communion, leave them to develop inner awakening at their own pace.

We are, after all, not talking of groups involved in mass intoxication or criminal activity.

Who among us has card-carrying authorisation to act as the Creator’s agent on earth? Not one of us. Yet up rises a mass emotional outcry, declaiming the hypnotic, cultish, subjugating hold that a mesmerising leading Dharmic light has over his or her group. The experience is never tested or studied; it is simply challenged, and blame apportioned to the shepherd. Yet the sheep are implicated in a contract of protection by the shepherd – and it is precisely this vital, valuable aspect underpinning the entire relationship that judgmental opinionwallahs fail to appreciate.

In education, each teacher is different from the next. Their commonality is their remit to impart information to their students for digestion, consideration and improvement. Dharmic leading lights play a similar role. Think back to your schooldays…you didn’t like or get on with all your teachers, but this did not stop them from being teachers, from fulfilling their remit as teachers.

Dharmic leading lights ought to be considered in the same vein. But, and the difference is significant here, whereas teachers learn and train to impart information and knowledge about specific subject-matters, Dharmic leading lights’ engagement is samskaric and dovetails with their previous births. Their disciples and followers are the schoolchildren of the classroom.

So the key learning here, and my suggestion, is that everybody ought to observe, study and learn before articulating disapproval – become the expert you seek to critique – and if a ‘student’ seeks your assistance then support them without attacking and vilifying their Dharmic leading light. Let the secular justice system take that individual to task if so needed. You should remain opinionless in the matter.

A Sikh does not judge or condemn based on emotion.

Khalsa negotiates a given problem without casting blame, while protecting the weak and the victim of injustice, doing so at personal cost to themselves if need be.

Khalsa’s path is protection of others through compassion for all.

January 2011. A Fresh Perspective On Sikhi: An Interview With Avtar (sent to To Jaspal Singh Bains of Sikh Times)

A Fresh Perspective On Sikhi: An Interview With Avtar (Interview conducted and compiled by Preeti Kaur)

You are a very cheerful, chic and colourful person, yet a pura Gursikh – that’s a very rare commodity in Sikhi. What is your background?

I was born in Kenya into a Gursikh household. Sant Hari Singh of Kaharpur, District Hoshiarpur, gave me as a blessing to my Bapuji. Upon my birth, Bapuji installed Sri Guru Granth Sahibji in the largest room of our house. From then, until his death, he slept on the floor of the room in which the Saroop was parkash. When he came to England, the first item he brought with him was that same Gurusaroop. Therefore, you see, I have always maintained that before making the decision to take amrit every Sikh household must use the largest upper-storey room for Gurusaroop and must do seva at home. It’s crucial that the children of the house observe and participate in this, and become an integral part of this culture, so they don’t feel isolated or ‘apart’ from their own identity.

The second most important thing Bapuji did was to put me under the tutelage of a very elegant Hindu Svami who, it turned out, was a prince that had left his privileged position. This Svami was master of two of the main nine schools of Hinduism. He also had a double doctorate in medicine and law via a European education system. His first words to me were ‘you are more fortunate than I, because you were born into and retain, whilst living in England, your Sikhi roop; and though I am much senior to you in metaphysics, I have the misfortune of not being born as a Sikh. If you are to learn from me then it is on the absolute agreement that you will never forsake you Sikhi roop’. I never have. I even rejected marriage proposals because the girls’ parents wanted me, their son-in-law, to drink, trim my beard and eat meat. I refused to do any of the three. Therefore, I never married.

In any case, via Svamiji I met and then began to advise leading figures on appropriate topics. I was also pivotal in establishing the Hindu faith’s presence in many European and American cities and towns. In time, this presence will pave the way for the re-introduction of Sikhi back into the mainstream European psyche. My education also meant I had to have in-depth contact with advanced metaphysical personages of all faiths, in order for which dialogue and interaction – and test of progression of my metaphysical abilities – to take place, I had to master in-depth knowledge of the major scriptures.

What were the most telling lessons you learned from this association with advanced metaphysical persons?

Never to quote stanzas from scriptures just to make a point. The stanzas within the scriptures are sacred. They are personal to you and your own development and their meaning will evolve and transform as you grow and develop. To quote scriptural stanzas during discourse is to quote nothing more than what you understand those stanzas to mean at that moment in time, in that specific context. You are crystallizing the sacred, shoehorning it into a definitional cul-de-sac… and by the time you’ve done it, uttered the sacred stanza, its meaning for you will already have changed. The lesson is that your relationship with the sacred is processual, dynamic.

I also learned that those outside Sikhi are truly envious of the unity they perceive as existing among us Sikhs. Now, it’s true that the faithful in all faiths bicker, argue and participate in generational feuds; but sadly, we are undermining our own positive PR and brand reputation. The three (now two) Sikh television channels in the UK portray nothing other than grey-bearded men exchanging angry volleys with anyone who dares to hold an opposing view. I personally wish the Sikhs had never secured the open forum provided by television through which to make fools of themselves. Mind you, I also pray to Waheguru that they learn to hold a civil tongue and leave the vitriol for off-camera discussions.

We are as a community very new to this media format, and it is to be expected that we revel in the opportunities it provides us to air our grievances – even at each other. But it is to be sincerely hoped that once the initial excitement wears off, once we are done with using television as an outlet for that much-vaunted phrase “freedom of expression”, then the calmer elements and individuals of the community can take centre-stage and present Sikhi in its true colours: as a commonwealth of views – within which all opinions are aired with mutual respect – undergirded by one shared mindset.

For my own part, I never engage in debates such as those we witness on the Sikh television channels. My method is to contact the influential person(s) regarding any given matter in a personal, private and humane way – and to express a concern and advocate a way forward. I achieve so much this way that is simply out of reach of those who mire themselves in committee discussions and elaborate debates.

Sikhs have forgotten the simple declaration set in motion by Guru Nanakdevji: a Sikh is an analyser, scrutinizer and improver of whatever is placed before them. So, my assessment of a point differs vastly from the run-of-the-mill Sadh, Sant or Svami. For example, doctorate-holders and professors are primarily information-gatherers unable to disseminate knowledge (beyond exchanging information with their academic counterparts). All my life, I have challenged these ‘experts’ – and successfully so, because their forte is that of information gathering. Therefore, you could say that I see matters very differently from others.

Can you begin by giving me a brief assessment of the status and treatment of Sikhs historically in India, as you see it?

In 1850’s, the British rulers in India stoked public dissent and then went on to forcefully put it down: during June of that year, an estimated 10,000 people were hung from trees, telegraph poles and any other natural or man-made device that appeared fit for the purpose of massacre. More than 97% of them were Sikhs. And the ostensible reason for this erstwhile show of British dominance? An Indian had dared to walk along the shady side of an avenue housing Englishmen! This incident had nothing to do with the Indian Mutiny.

It was not the first time, nor the last, that Sikhs would be used as cannon-fodder by a British empire entering its last century of ill-gotten power. Jawalan Bagh is another state-managed incident of Sikh slaughter that comes immediately to mind. Pre-independence Sikhs made their representations truthfully and honorably but the duplicitous, cunning, deceitful power-brokers of England and representatives of India and Pakistan impressed upon the Sikhs that a minority could not form a ruling government as such a template did not exist anywhere in the world. The Sikhs knew they were being lied to, as Israel was in the process of being declared a sovereign state where the minority ruled the majority, but they aligned themselves to the ‘Hukam’ of Waheguru since ardas at Harmandir Sahib had been done to accept the prevailing resolution and its outcome.

Whether we assess this decision in terms of accepting the inevitable or following ‘Hukam’, the bloodshed that followed the division of our country was once again paid mostly in Sikh blood. It was just another exercise, by a ruling power that had already calculated the likely outcome – massacre of Sikhs – of spreading misinformation and generating as much confusion and mayhem as possible during partition. The British managed this massacre fantastically. Their fear was that if India were not split along religious lines then a unified India incorporating Sikhs, Pathans, Gurkha, and Rajputs would be able, within a few generations, to successfully challenge the dominance of any European power. Their strategy, therefore, was to target India’s most successful and focused ethnic culture during participation in order to strangle the opportunity for unity. The Sikh ethnie was the natural target back then, and became so again in 1984 – an episode that more than any other in our long history of repression reigns supreme in Sikh collective memory.

What lies behind the recurring repression, abuse and massacre of Sikhs?

What is common to the incidents mentioned above is a template for governance whose very success in enabling long-term autocratic rule has caused it to be enacted ad nausuem by rulers throughout history. That template involves a none-too-subtle game of conflict-brokering: whether it be internal ethnic friction or war with supposed foreign oppressors, such conflict draws peoples attention away from the domestic policies of oppression and repression that they might otherwise agitate against, away from the fact of ineffective government that is staring them in the face.

The Sikh Raj is one of only two instances of governance, in recent history, which broke with the traditional template and furthermore was based on neither slavery nor the dictatorship-through-consent that is emblematic of the ‘free’ western world. The other instance, also provided by India, stretches farther back into history and was lauded as far away as Siberia and eastern Europe.

I’d like to explore the link between what you call the ‘dominant governance template’ – and its interplay of manipulation and repression as a means to achieve total State control – and the events of 1984, which remain possibly the single most evocative source of collective Sikh memory and pain. 

European readers are quick to cite the prescience of George Orwell’s “1984” when assessing the rise of the autocratic State in modern decades. But what that book laid out was based not on the author’s uncanny ability to see into the future, rather his ability to portray in literary form what governance is and has always been about: namely, sustaining total State control via oppression of its people. The events of 1984 reveal the extent to which the dominant governance template, particularly the linkages between power and oppression, have shaped our Sikh history.

Without detracting from the personal and collective tragedies that are immediately called to mind when we speak of 1984, it is irrefutable that 1984 was a stage-managed event by the then ruling government of India to assert its dominance and use its massacre of Sikhs as its calling card. It did so with the aid of the country’s security apparatus; and of course, with the full knowledge of western powers, which, true to form, provided undercover support and arms to both sides in the conflict.

Look beyond Sikh history and we can find the western powers indulging in the same game of manipulation and hypocrisy in relation to other communities and conflicts – Sri Lanka is one. On one hand the west granted asylum to victims of violence in the Sri Lanka conflict, while on the other it maintained and entertained ties with the Sri Lankan government – meanwhile, it supplied arms to both sides. The result – the west secured and retained the emotional subordinate attachment of both sides in the Sri Lanka conflict. Brilliant!

The outcomes of 1984 followed a blueprint established by the British and other Europeans during the centuries of their rapacious colonizing: create conflict; encourage agitation against the rulers; suppress and demonise the agitators, and remind people that the power of the State is absolute! In 1984, therefore, the State’s choice of armour, the positioning of its troops, and even the type and number of rounds those troops fired in any given town or city was predetermined and followed the blueprint provided by the British.

Thus, 1984 was an example of the time-old, cyclic devices the State uses to cement its power.

In a slightly different configuration of the power-conflict relationship, the State sometimes seeks to generate conflict with foreign states (as the British have done in Iraq and Afghanistan) in order to bind and blind its own people: bind them in support of war and blind them to the need to agitate against their government’s oppression of its own citizens.  In yet another configuration, as in the South Pacific archipelago of Fiji, it will incite conflict, even violence, among constituent communities at home, and manage that conflict to suit its own power agenda.

Moreover, if we examine the current 2011 English riots it is blatant how the United Kingdom security apparatus totally manufactured, gave out misinformation about a bullet lodged in a police officer’s radio during the gun attack and murder of an innocent Afro-Caribbean man in Tottenham north London by the police to justify his murder. The first bullet, we are expected to accept, was fired by the black man and lodged itself in one of the police officer’s radios. Hence, another police officer shot the black man dead. It later emerged that the dead man had not in fact fired his gun; and it became necessary to explain that the bullet lodged in one of the police officer’s radios was in fact a result of the other police officer taking aim at the victim, whereupon the bullet went through him and was caught in the radio.

It’s curious, is it not, that in order to cover up the initial lie which so angered the victim’s family and his community and people across the country, the police presented an alternative scenario that flouts completely a cardinal police rule: not to discharge your weapon unless you have a clean line of sight, certainly not if the bullet may go clean through the intended victim and into a colleague or anybody else. In reality, the bullet was already lodged in the police officer’s radio before the standoff with, and premeditated murder of, Mark Duggan took place.

And what of the subsequent riots themselves? Let us remember that the threatened police cuts had not yet taken place, and that the riots began not on the busy weekend but early in the week – both of which give the lie to the police statement that the force was short on numbers to deal with the riots. Repeatedly, we witnessed footage of police drawing back from the rioters, giving them space and time to carry out their attacks on homes and businesses, and ultimately to kill three men who stood to protect their community.

This is not the action of a police force threatened by a large group of hooded youths; it is the action of a police force with footholds in the criminal world contriving to escalate the rioting. They even aided and abetted the rioters: standing back and grinning at each other, and providing a protective cordon around the youths who set fire to a white Dhillons catering van in the middle of a road in West Bromwich. The footage, filmed by a Sikh television channel, illustrated for all to see how the state’s security apparatus aided and abetted rioting.

The primary reason for this violence illustrates the extent the United Kingdom police force is prepared to go in conniving from the Treasury and the Home Secretary to effect only negligible reduction in the police force’s budget.

The security apparatus of every country sets the parameters within which its governance operates. For example, the police of an isolated state like Britain have the power to put an end to drugs in this country. But they won’t. If it were to do so, it loses its own lucrative funding and generous pension package. Thus, it works in tandem with the criminal element to oil the machinery to maintain its own financial package. Fractures within the criminal fraternity provide a police force with scope for ongoing arrests and prosecutions to maintain its fictitious role as protector of the state.

Although, if for reasons relating to its own PR, the police finds it efficacious to disassemble any given criminal fraternity it can and does so, in a manner befitting any well-coordinated state security apparatus. Hence, there is a tried-and-tested governance template that can be applied to any country. It is European and often Anglo-Saxon in origin and features, and is designed to maintain a system of law and order advantageous to the state’s security apparatus rather than to the citizen.

Despite the totality of state power, in the form of the unassailable power of a state’s security apparatus, is the energy and anger of those who fight against, as the Sikhs did in 1984, not a positive thing? 

Close to three decades after the event, it is claimed that Sikh individuals involved in 1984 continue to languish in prison. In the UK, Sardaar K. S, Chahal – enthused by firebrands during a visit to India, where he was subsequently a victim of torture, was thrown into a British prison for six years without charge, immediately following his return to this county. The firebrands behind Chahal’s eventual imprisonment, and that of many others, spoke forcefully from stages in the US and UK about the need to fight. Their passion and anger was taken up by any number of Sikhs who went willingly to join the fight in India, bulwarked by promises of financial assistance in their efforts to create an independent media in India, to implement grassroots education, and to agitate for separate Statehood.

Reality, as experienced by Sardaar Chahal, was that those with financial clout – never mind the community at large – never delivered on the promise of assistance: the sad fact is that Chahal’s wife received nothing more than lip service in the way of assistance during the first few months of his imprisonment, and thereafter, not even that. Only one person was dedicated to Chahals release throughout and they almost lost the family business through their dedication.

Fast forward to August 2011, and the insults extended to the Sri Guru Granth Sahibji in Panjab. This is not, as some would have it, an internal community-rooted problem. Rather, it is the latest instalment of the Government of India and its security forces partners’ plans to ignite a Sikh conflict which it can then smash, in order to drive home the old message – yes, among Sikhs, but really to all constituent communities in India that want self-rule – that you had better bow down and tow the government’s line. As ever, the lesson to be imparted is that of peoples’ subjugation.

If I understand correctly, you’re heading towards the statement that in order for the cycle of Sikh repression – and let’s be brutal about it, our eventual annihilation – to stop, we need to rethink how we Sikhs set about defining and enacting our role as warriors vis-à-vis totalitarian State power?

Indeed, the stage is set for a new generation to participate in the cycle of government incitement to conflict, community anger, and bloodshed of innocents of which 1984 was a part… the questions facing us are: How shall we Sikhs play out our role as the eternal ‘cannon-fodder’ this time around? Do we have alternative methods of articulating ourselves and therefore avenging State repression? Is there a better way to achieve our aims, without accepting that bloodshed is a necessary component of that?

What are our options? How can Sikhs achieve freedom from the cycle of repression and massacre, once and for all?

There are three options, all of them grounded in three very different types of intelligence. Which option do we choose this time around: The one that advocates commonsense? The one rooted in a certain low-level educational intelligence? Or shall we plump for the role shaped by refined academic intelligence?

To give our choice some historical mooring, let us consider that the fall of the Sikh Raj was predicated on the application of commonsense; and that 1984 was the child of redactive commonsense and education intelligence. Times are different now, and the tools at our disposal are too: consider that in 2011 we have an independent, user-driven, electronic media with a massive potential for emotional outreach that although embryonic (in terms of human potential for technology) is nevertheless a rather impressive powerhouse.

Is the media, and social media particularly, really the way forward? I can see how it replicates (in a peculiarly twenty-first century way), the success the Muslims have had in creating the notion of ‘ummah’ (pan-Islamic unity), but will this stop the desecration of Sri Guru Granth Sahibji in an isolated village in India?

You have anticipated what I was going on to say: which is, that before we embrace twenty-first century technology as the medium through which to break Sikh shackles, we would do well to remember that the State has already assessed its uses, and will already be devising strategies to utilize this medium of communication for its own end and to defeat freedom-fighters like the Sikhs.

The State has already anticipated the internet and social media’s influence in aiding mass mobilisation; it has already tested the capabilities and limitations of the ‘free’ Sikh media that is the basis for our modern-day outreach to diasporic Sikh communities across the globe; and by tactically playing out the removal of a Sikh’s turban on the global media stage, it has been able to analyse the Sikh community’s response to this as well and that of global media. Knowledge like this is priceless. So, my point is that we need to be intelligent about how we use twenty-first century resources, because you can be sure that our oppressors are using them too!

Can you expand on the options you defined above as being based on commonsense, limited educational intelligence and refined academic intelligence?

The recent insult to the Sri Guru Granth Sahibji has to be understood as an event engineered by the State to incite armed Sikh agitation, which it will allow to forment before crushing the Sikhs once again. It is nothing more than an exercise for the State, one more act in its stage-managed play that will result in our very own ‘final solution’.

Supposing that this time we accept that we are being manipulated in the tried-and-tested way, then unlike the fall of the Sikh Raj and 1984 perhaps this time we ought to resort to using our third gambit: that of refined academic intelligence, in order to counter or circumvent the insults so readily being extended to us.

Whereas the commonsense and limited education intelligence approaches tell us respectively to shrug and bow down to the inevitable, and to take an impassioned, brawn-over-brain stance, refined academic intelligence seeks a third way.

It demands that we improvise upon the format and medium favoured by our oppressors to articulate and stage our own fight. What’s the format and medium that our oppressors favour? Deceit. Cunning. Manipulation. All cloaked by a veil of innocent paternalism. I’m not advocating that we resort to those tactics or sink as low as the State does. But we do need to understand the full arsenal of tactics used by our oppressors, and based on that holistic-political understanding emerges a holistic-political approach to ending the role of Sikhs as pawns in the game of domination that government is intent on playing.

What precisely does this holistic-political – refined academic intelligence – approach entail? 

I pleaded from 1981 onwards that we, the Sikhs, should engage all the states of India in a shared aspiration for self-rule while maintaining federal fiscal, defence and foreign policy and establishing a common national language (Sanskrit or Hindi) that once and for all displaces the continuing dominance of a colonial language. Within this federal system, all states would be empowered to enshrine their own culture, language, history and heritage.

I was the sole voice insisting that we need to unify ‘our’ Aryadesh (noble land), the original name of Bharat before it was renamed India, given that we Sikhs are a part of the original Arya (Noble) people, by bringing both Pakistan and Bangladesh back into our fold. And that following this, the governance of Bharat should be chaired by all its ethnic states in a revolving eight-month duration. This is not as difficult as it sounds.

If the pre- independence map of Bharat is superimposed on Europe it would stretch from Iceland to Moscow and from north of Scandinavia to the north of Africa. This shows how large-scale a problem we have in the multitude of races, languages, cultures, heritages, history, morality and ethics – a complexity far greater than that of present-day Europe and its flailing attempt to cobble together the unity requisite to be a major economic power, and a diversity that we can make work and have made work before.

Consider for instance that Aryadesh, as it once was, included Afghanistan as well as Burma, and was the imperial power as far as Vietnam and most of the Pacific. It was the power bloc that most of Eastern Europe looked to for guidance also. In ancient literature ranging from eastern Siberia and Scandinavia to ancient oral traditions of Africa, Aryadesh is acknowledged and lauded.

Don’t forget in all of this that the combined populations of North America, Europe, the former USSR, Australia and New Zealand are less than the population of present India. Thus, we are a major power and await only the combination of our energies with those of Pakistan and Bangladesh to resume the absolute – and peaceful – authority over the globe we once had.

Ofcourse, I wasn’t listened to back then. However, mark my words: one day that unity will come. And our land and people will once again be called the Noble people from the Noble land. It was Aryadesh that devised Sanskrit and disseminated it globally: Sanskrit names abound in the names of rivers, valleys, mountain ranges, and towns all over the world. Even the word ‘Sikh’ is found in many of the north European languages, just as the words ‘Avatar’ and ‘kaka’ exist in both European and oriental languages. Though in most cases the meaning has changed, the words themselves continue to be spoken and pronounced in line with the rules laid down by Sanskrit.

Therefore, when a Hindu announces that Sanskrit is his ancient language he is lying. It is my ancestral language. Hindu came from me and my ancestral race, not the other way around. My race’s name may indeed be Sikh now but I am a very ancient race and I emanate from the Noble land. Thus, India belongs to me first, then to the Hindu. In fact, Hindu is not even a religion or a race. Hindu is a ‘tag’ only. A tag that has gained respectability for sure, but a tag nonetheless. I challenge any Hindu to prove that Hindu is a religion and indeed a race.

Ethnicity is a force de majeur in the post-colonial world, often traced back (a little lazily, it must be said) to the fall of the Soviet Union in the 1980s. When ethnicity is such a potent and viable means of organisation and identity, how then can the ethnies of almost an entire continent be refused right to organize and regulate themselves along ethnic lines on the basis of their shared language, territory, culture and origins.

Of course, all my arguments fell on deaf ears back then. In 1984, the firebrands carried the day, and understandably so given that mass mobilization on the basis of shared self-identity fires up the emotions in a powerful way. Perversely, though – and this too is characteristic of the rules of the mass mobilization game – the firebrands fired everybody else up and then returned to the luxury of their western lives. They and their families emerged from 1984 unscathed, while innocents in India lost their lives and their families continue to suffer to this day.

Mobilising people to agitate in the streets and take up arms will not work for us, in India. I agree that it has a very visual impact – think of the demonstrations in the UK against the war in Iraq and more recently against government cuts, but neither of these demonstrations resulted in policy reversal. We had a voice, we used it, and politics carried on without a second’s thought for what we had to say.

We need a different approach, much like the one that I advocated some thirty years ago, and which was used by the Sikh Gurujis as their primary tool of engagement. Yes, we need a fully armed, officially trained corp that can impart its knowledge to the masses as ongoing information for the community’s safety and protection; but this must be developed alongside the use of refined academic intelligence.

So what is a refined academic intelligence and what are its advantages? As I stated earlier, refined academic intelligence recognizes that the rules of the game, the game itself, are defined by one’s opponents and are stacked up in their favour. The trick is to rearrange those rules to suit one’s own strengths. In this instance, it would work in several panzer style, double-pronged attacks and relate to (i) fighting for independent, culturally nuanced constitutions that make sense to the lives and ethos of the people they’re developed for; and (ii) fighting fire with water…

Why is it so important to focus our attention on constitution-building? How will this assist us in ending the cycle of Sikh oppression?

Firstly, I propose that in every Gurdwara we should have a copy of the constitutions of India, Sweden, France, Israel, Japan and the USA, since 99% of countries around the world use the European template constitutions as the basis for their own. How many of us know the tangible aspects of each of these documents, which essentially control our lives? Very few of us, if any at all; we have no knowledge of their content other than what we are told by experts, whom we trust on faith.

The conundrum for we Sikhs, like so many non-western civilizations maintaining their cultural heritage whilst living in the West, is how to anchor that distinct cultural heritage to an alien Western ethos. And therein lies the crux of the problem: the imperative to make two irreconcilable things coexist. We are constantly mired in the need to present ourselves as having a good balance of East and West… ever hear a European struggling with the need to maintain a balanced West-East lifestyle? No, because it is the non-Europeans who are bullied to ‘civilise’ themselves and prove themselves and manage a contradictory and confusing balance of lifestyles as a test of their humanness.

If we follow in Gurujis’ steps, we the Sikhs are capable of freeing not just ourselves, but the pan-non-European community and all non-European states from constitutions that are utterly redundant in the face of their cultural norms (and, it must be said, their cultural ‘flux’)…. We the Sikhs can bring much needed peace to the citizens of non-European states: Sikh-led freedom for all the states of Africa from the slavery of an irrelevant, meaningless, alien document is within our grasp.

The challenge – and it’s no small one – is that we must continue to operate within the laws of the land as they stand. And in the context of the recent abuse of Sri Guru Granth Sahibji in Panjab, this means that we have to make representations to the current powers-that-be in India. The key difference from 1984 is that we refrain from taking the bait and leading ourselves and plenty of innocents into an unwinnable physical war, as we did almost thirty years ago, and avoid our role in reproducing the same conflict – albeit slightly reconfigured for the times – generation after generation after generation.

Let’s use our western freedoms and our position here to launch the freedom of ethnic groups globally. Let’s lead the war on behalf of the silent majority of the dispossessed through academia, where state security apparatus’ are by-and-large powerless to intervene.

We will achieve a bloodless victory globally.

I have witnessed many a killing in my life: in East Africa; in the wars between China, India and Pakistan; in Eastern Europe. The wars were cultural but were fought over alien constitutions that applied in no good measure to either of the warring sides.

If we develop an Indian constitution that is free of all European imprints, then we safeguard the wealth that is India’s mind and spiritual psyche. How on earth is the Indian security apparatus going to silence Sikh input into human history then?

Future is an organic entity. In changing history, we shape the future. Future demands a ‘thinking outside the box’ attitude. Look at simple things like football. We can evolve its rules to suit today’s market and mental attitude. The list below is one we could introduce to the game through our gurdwara teams label as Gurdwara Football Association Rules:

  1. Remove the offside rule
  2. If a foul is committed in the defending half by the defence, then only one defender plus the goalkeeper faces three attackers until a goal is scored or the play results in a dead ball
  3. Winning a fourth corner automatically converts into a penalty
  4. When a corner is won the only players allowed to be involved are three defenders and the goalkeeper against up to eight members of the attacking team
  5. Committing a foul results in that player and another from the same team (nominated by the opposing team, and excluding the goalkeeper) being sent off the field of play for ten minutes
  6. A red card results in the offending player being sent off permanently and another of his teammates (as nominated by the opposing team) being sent off for fifteen minutes

What I propose will bring the fun back into football… and probably a lot more than the measly 1 -3 goals that we watch being scored in an average match, as well as a return of more technically advanced play. For, we must remember that football is basically a cardiovascular exercise for the players, and a channel of relaxation for spectators. The English attitude to football is – curiously – one of war. They call it a “man’s game” – meaning it is inherently connected with violence and intimidation. No. Football is a game to exercise the heart, lungs, mind and various groups of other muscles of the body. It is not war.

But reverting to the matter at hand.

Abdali Shah silenced the Sikhs for a while but he could not silence the written Sikh ethos. The sword can kill the writer but not the Word. Living in a free country as we do, we must accept its advantages as a gift from the Gurujis and utilize these to produce work that will be replicated globally for the benefit of all humanity.

And what do you mean by fighting fire with water – which is the second in your proposed two-pronged offensive against Sikh repression?

The second in the double-pronged attack that I advocate is this: if one Sikh’s turban is forcefully removed, I want five Sikhs to adopt the full image of the Sikh here in the ‘free’ west. If five Gurusaroops are desecrated, I want ten handwritten copies to replace them. That’s why I call it fighting fire with water. Fighting fire with fire is easy but achieves nothing: you enter a cycle of repression, retaliation, greater repression, increased retaliation. But think about this: It’s water that gives me sustenance in a desert, it’s water that allows things to grow and multiply. If we are abused or insulted, we multiply the sheer number of us that there are to abuse and insult. It really is as elegantly simple as that.

The holistic-political approach you talk about as the path to ending Sikh repression is seemingly simple and elegant, as you say. But why aren’t you speaking in terms of values that resonate more easily with people like me who were born and live in the west, such as democracy?  

The problem we all face, and I’m talking about all non-European residents of the European world, is that western parameters have come to define the sole terms of our existence and value. We are brainwashed into supporting a contrived, constrained, and confusing ‘ideology’ called democracy. Marketed as something that grants freedom, equality and a voice for all, democracy is nothing more than a commercial behemoth that beguiles the masses, through unfulfilled and unfulfulling promises of freedom and equality – and more importantly, through controlled financial independence – to collude in amassing untold wealth for the small minority: power-wielders, which in the modern world, means the heads of multinational conglomerates.

The vanguards of the so-called democratic enterprise have successfully created a gulf that pits ethics and morality against personal selfish interest, to the glory of the latter. The individual gets dispensation to exist so long as (s)he does so within the straitjacketed parameters set and regulated by a partnership of the State and conglomerates.

Today, more than ever, the citizen is a prisoner of the State-Conglomerate. Your every movement is traced. You are no longer a name, nor even a number. You’re just a cog, a part of the machinery engineered to produce ever-increasing profits for the State-Conglomerate.  This is western democracy. So, when you talk about democracy as a value that resonates with we non-Europeans resident in the west, you’re really talking about a machine that eats you up and spits you out. You’re talking about a tactic, a device, a mechanism that beguiles us with sweet-talking nonsense into prostituting ourselves for the enjoyment and ultimate gain of the State-Conglomerate.

Holistic-political Politics is a different proposition altogether. It takes the ethos of Dharma, a realisation too far advanced for the European psyche to understand, and evolves this into a political system that harmonises with both the natural environment and evolving human awareness. Thus, the individual is the cornerstone of the community. The pace of commercial growth occurs in tandem with the needs of the collective as long as it does not transgress against nature. Inner wellbeing takes precedence over the accruement of material glitter. Disease is limited and containable. Wealth is measured in terms of achieving balance between one’s physical prowess and inner sublimity.

Technology, likewise, is of a constitutively different order, advancing beyond anything that the European psyche can grasp and humanely deal with, and it does so without poisoning the natural or human environments: for example, a wealth of knowledge of advanced space travel is detailed in our ancient scriptures, as is information about fuel systems that will propel a craft to our nearest star within an hour or so. Share even an iota of this knowledge with the western world, and technology is wrenched from the imperative of harmonious development and aligned to the goal of wielding power through subjugation of our people; hence, missiles, warheads and germ warfare.

This is a far cry from Dharmic technology whereby we travel out into the cosmic worlds peacefully. All non-European races are equipped to live in this style. The problem is that nobody has thus far come forward to rewrite the communal template that draws out and celebrates the inner self instead of greed and selfishness. So, you see, western democracy is the antithesis of a balanced, aligned, harmonious and dharmic holistic-political-political way of being.

Just look at how western democracy has invaded our places of worship. We’re obliged to hold commercial elections rather than nominating selfless persons to act as out stalwarts. Health and safety regulations are commanding how and where we prepare and cook our GurKaLangar. Deg, the embodiment of Guru’s essence, is regulated by health and safety protocol. What next? Will the Europeans rewrite our Guru Granth Sahibji for us? Will our fear of the health detriments of certain foodstuffs, as prescribed by the Europeans, lead us to bow to the Guruji whose essence we implore to invest our Deg, and then turn our back on the grace that is proffered by Guruji in the form of Deg by accepting only the merest morsel because we fear contagion? Such are the blindness’s we have already begun embracing as our future Sikhi. Yet, woe betide the stranger who desecrates our scriptures?!

The irony and sheer hypocrisy is painful. We have become collective assailants of our own Dharma, demoting it to merely a religion. Which begs the question: what gives us the right to rise in anger when somebody throws our scriptures into water along with alcohol?

We know we have the right to feel anger, inside ourselves, at such desecration. But we sabotage our right to express it, to counter it through action.  A case in point is presented by the issues of the dastaar and kirpaan: we complain about our dastaars being removed by airport security personnel, but we failed to stand steadfast in our representation to Britain and later the United Nations about why our kirpaans must have nine-inch long blades…  The progressive chipping away of our faith is par for the course among European powers, but why do we have to collude in it? Because, we have come to blindly cherish the spectre of democracy – with its lure of small-time wealth, passing media fame (and infamy), and the carte blanche it gives us and our children to blow small fortunes on irresponsible commercial ventures and divorce settlements.

Today, a Sikh never acknowledges a fellow Sikh on the road unless they belong to the same caste/Gurdwara. And it is we, the Sikhs, who seek an independent state – why? How are we going to treat each other any differently, any better in our own independent state than we already do? The illusion of freedom is always sweeter than reality. Actual freedom entails acting responsibly for, and towards, others before yourself; it’s when somebody takes care of you without being asked; how many Sikhs among us have gone to assist a fellow Sikh at our own cost, upon hearing their problem? Not many. So, what really is the use of an independent state – so that we can continue to abuse our own people but in the luxury of a place that we can call our own and in which we can wield unyielding power; so that we can go on to oppress our own people the way our current oppressors do?

Sikho, it is not an independent State that will alleviate your suffering at the hands of the current State powers. It is you looking after another Sikh’s interest that will go some way towards alleviating your suffering. Living in this ‘free’ west we gleefully celebrate fellow Sikhs’ misfortunes – what makes you think that having gained independence you are going to care for each other any more than you do now? Panjab is governed by elected Panjabi Sikh… what boons have they given to the disenfranchised Sikhs of Panjab? None whatsoever. That too will be the reality of your own independent state. Self-interest will reign supreme, and everybody else can go to hell… but, hey, at least it will be an independent Sikh hell.

Many will have a negative reaction to what I’ve just said, but we all know it’s true. We all know that we’re adept, in the way of the western world, of talking about supporting each other, but turning our backs at the very moment we need to deliver on that promise. Of course there are instances when mutual support is provided, but it’s not the norm; and quite frankly, securing an independent Sikh state will not magically transform us all into model co-responsible citizens.

It is time for we Sikhs to act like a nation, to make ourselves worthy of being a nation and of having a state of our own: we must transform ourselves now; we must start living our current lives in the ‘free’ west on the basis of our own precepts, and central to these must be the joyful imperative of supporting one another without judgement or precondition.

We can’t sit on the fence anymore, take our ‘blending’ of east and west to inexplicable degrees of confusion: on one hand we are quick to condemn an act and assign responsibility, on the other hand we announce that everything that happens in predestined. Which is it?  On one hand lies self-power, on the other is Hukam. Do you want to dream of a utopian state, or do you accept Hukam as a totality? Judgement begets evil, while reflection on the totality of all things sees humanity as one and opens the eyes to different ways of attaining your desired end.

You’ve raised a really interesting point about the different ways in which we can view the recent desecration of Sri Guru Granth Sahibji, and how these offer us crucially distinct ways of dealing with this latest installment of violence and oppression against Sikhs. If I understand you correctly: by focusing on assigning blame and responsibility we’re perpetuating a cycle of judgement, anger and impotence; but if we reflect and accept the way of things, then actually that gives us the power to effect the change we want to see?

Absolutely. We can either point the finger at our aggressors and dream of being free from them in our own independent Sikh state, our utopia, our heaven on earth. Or, we can reflect, and accept that we are but slaves of the Hindus and that such is our destiny for the time being.

It may not seem like it, but the power for change and attainment of our own independent state lies in taking the second path…

It comprises two equally controversial aspects. The first is that of an independent Panjab – attainable only if we are regarded as natural warrior-statesmen by the west. Consider that the two decades of war against Muslim countries has become financially untenable for the west, added to which it is forced to accept asylum-seekers from the communities of the same regimes it is fighting. This asylum element is gathering momentum and will, in the lifetimes of its western-born children and grandchildren explode like a time bomb and wreak havoc on the same streets that sheltered their parents’ generations earlier.

The west needs another ‘Israel’ only this time on the western border of India. This nation will stretch from Kashmir to Karachi and from west Panjab to few miles outside Delhi. The west would arm it totally, finance its survival and develop its education, health and general infrastructure. The Chinese would use the same nation to target Islamist problems on its western borders. The Russians would use the same nation to tackle an uprising in the  Muslim states along its southeastern border and the west has two nations at opposite ends of the main Muslim countries it can use to subdue any danger it feels coming from the Muslim states. India would be protected along the very border that has seen her raped time and again. A Sikh state of Panjab is in everybody’s interest as it will be the local police in the very same manner Israel is presently. Being an economic power will also give it a mandate to dominate the locality in tandem with India. Nevertheless, the reality of such a situation begs the question: are you prepared to live in a constant war zone for generation to come?

If that is controversial then the second element is even more so, and it goes like this…

I, the Sikh, am a slave of the Hindu. Let the Hindu hate me. Let the Hindu kill me. He will succeed in killing me if it is so destined. But, let there be no mistake, that I – the most humble and ardent of all the Hindu’s slaves – will empower and free the rest of the non-European world from slavery. How, let me elaborate.

Let us, the Panjabi slaves of the Hindu, present an annual commemorative plaque to India, received by or delivered to the Prime Minister of India, that celebrates our ardent slavery. Let that annual celebration seep into the annals of tradition and rewrite Indian history, acknowledging that it was a Hindu slave rather than a Sikh who fought bravely and won freedom from the ruling Islamists; that it was Hindus – and their slaves – rather than Sikhs who fought and gave their lives in the wars of Europe.

Let us invite every Hindu to look their slaves in the eyes, and remove our dastaars with their own hands, and cut our keis-dhaari with their own scissors, and celebrate our life of slavery in the full glare of the media. For we are slaves of the Hindus, and we must rejoice in this. After all, Hindu India’s self-esteem is wrapped up in the hatred it has for the prestige of the Sikh dastaar and we ought to honour that. So, let us proclaim 1st August as World Slaves’ Day.

Right now, people – Sikhs – are asking how it’s possible for me to say these things. I say to them: we are Sikhs. We are not frightened of the truth. We are born to celebrate the truth. We know that the truth sets us free, that it is not to be feared. And the present truth is that we are slaves of Hindu India. If Hindu India can be proud of its continuing legacy in maintaining the slave state of Panjab, then it will rejoice in World Slave Day with us.

If Hindu India feels capable of being as strong in practice as it is in the quiet of its mind, then alternatively it will give Sikhs their own independent state, aligned to the collective Union of India. Otherwise, we must accept gracefully, as Hindu India itself must, that we are slaves of a greater cowardly slave mentality… Hindu India itself.

The path to freedom from oppression lies in bowing one’s head to the truth of one’s oppressed status; to the truth that circumscribing our oppression is the cowardice of our oppressors, who cannot countenance giving us our freedom, for fear of losing their power. The greater authority and legitimacy comes, however, precisely from willingness to abdicate one’s power over somebody else and granting them their freedom.

So, unless and until Hindu India emerges from the carapace of its cowardice, we must live by the truth of its fear and cowardice, and by the truth of our slave existence. The far sadder and deeper truth is that in desecrating our scriptures and colluding in our denigration on the world stage, Hindu India desecrates its own scriptural teaching.

But if it is so, then as slaves we must bend to the will of Hindu India: if it seeks to denigrate us and itself in one fell swoop, we must as its slaves do its bidding: so, let us take a Saroop of Guru Sahibji to the Raj Sabha weekly and ask them to nominate a Hindu to desecrate the same in our presence. Let us celebrate our slavery with happy smiling faces, each time an article of our faith is desecrated by Hindu India. Let us call India by its true and full name: Hindu India

Just as slaves of the Europeans were branded with marks of their ownership, so we are branded by the same: our dastaar and keis-dhaari are emblems of our slave identity as far as the cowardly Hindu is concerned. If we live in truth, then let’s celebrate those brandings: henceforth, every Sikh must wear the full faith artifacts of Sikhi, in celebration of these symbols of our ownership by Hindu India, and proclaim themselves as true, abiding slaves of Hindu India.

If Hindu India kills one of us, then let us form a line ten deep and five across, our hands folded and our faces shining with smiles, and beseech Hindu India’s embassies across the world to kill us all, so that we can help it secure an ever greater sense of pride and self-esteem.

Come all ye Sikhs, stand beside me and proclaim your celebration of being a Gursikh and a slave of Hindu India, proclaim your gladdened heart that Hindu India gains so much from humiliating and killing me. I, who as a powerful, peaceful, warrior-saint present it with the most formidable obstacle  it will face and fight: that of smiling, passive, non-resistance.

Bhole Sone Haal

Sat Siri Akal.

 

April 2013. Sikh novelty act @ 10 Downing St; “All humanity is One” (sent to To Bhai Mohinder Singhji, Sikh Consultative Forum)

Sikh Consultative Forum – Bhai Mohinder Singhji

Gurdwara Nishkam Sewak Jatha, Soho Road, Birmingham, United Kingdom

Satsiriakalji,

Re:  Feedback – UK Parliament

Please decide exactly what role you as the lead chair of Sikh Consultative Forum are trying to fulfil. Either you are a common-garden religious personality cult or you are the head of a dharmic organisation (albeit overladen with cultish behaviour).

For the cult leader, the hunger for notching up photo opportunities is an indication of that individual’s starved sense of self-worth – and of a cheap, tawdry, ego.

For the figurehead of the Sikh Consultative Forum, participating as a novelty act in the kirtan performance at 10 Downing Street last year is absolutely unacceptable.

Why did you participate as a novelty act @ 10 Downing Street?????

And having done so, insult is added to injury by the fact that this year your representative at 10 Downing Street read a message from you containing words he couldn’t pronounce, and whose meanings were lost on both him and a majority of the attendees.

Why such a horrendous spectacle in place of a dignified presentation? The message was off the mark, the delivery embarrassingly out of sequence, and inappropriate for the setting.

Who advises you?

Experts in public relation disasters?!

Or, delusional speech writers who chose on a thesaurus but lack the nuance to understand the impact of the words therein?

Either way, blame cannot be laid at the door of these advisors, whoever they are – until and unless you decide what role you are trying to fulfill.

I brought to your attention many years ago the very impasse of such a situation – and the fact that you need to re-evaluate precisely what image you are trying to project. For, I have yet to see an archbishop, let alone the Pope, visiting the Indian Parliament or Prime Minister’s office and sitting on the floor to lead a gospel choir. So why on earth did you do?

Have you lost your senses or are you that hungry for popularity as a gimmicky stage-act. Is it that you in fact are trying to create a niche act to perform on a public stage similar to the Queen’s Buckingham garden celebrations?

Please stop embarrassing your position, begin taking your responsibility seriously, and act with the decorum your position demands.

You have no idea the role that has been entrusted to you. That lack of awareness is no excuse for you to behave in the manner you have been of late.

Yes, for the ordinary servile Desi whatever you utter has meaning. No one challenges you, corrects you, or has a sufficient enough grasp on things to tell you honestly and frankly that you are talking ‘jackanory’. But you should be sensitive enough not to get caught examining and explaining terms and words about which you really have very little depth of knowledge.

You are simply regurgitating another’s unchallenged written word as if that explanation is sacrosanct. Please, leave that type of banal simpleton’s explanation to the carousel gianis.

You are a figurehead. Please have the maturity and sensibility to remain in that domain only. Let the pseudo-hypereducated who have more information than common sense at their disposal knot themselves in explanations where they are left chasing their own tails.

Here, I will give an example I have often heard you and most other Sikh ‘orators’ vocalise. You state that ‘All humanity is One’. Really? If that is the case then why do your contingent and Sikhs in general complain about Sikh girls marrying Islamic men and becoming Mohammedan in their faith practice?

Reality is that you lot have a heart failure if your children wed out of caste. So much for your ‘All humanity is One’ nonsense. If your ‘sevadars’ did proper research of the actual root meaning of the words contained in that quotation you and they would realise that the quote embodies recognition that ‘in creation and non-creation the same essence presides and resides in all’.

“All humanity is One” refers, therefore, to the essence; it fundamentally does not refer to classification, division and manifestation in matter.

Thus, you are the same as the sea of oil that runs deep in the earth just as you are the same as the spark that escapes the sun allowing earth to manifest ‘life’. You as a human are the same in essence as a cow or any other meat. Thus, eating meat makes you a cannibal.

If the quote “All humanity is One” referred only to humans then you cannot complain when children leave the Sikh faith to embrace another. Rather, the quote, read in this way, impels you to rejoice in the fact. But do you? No, you have knee-jerk tears to compensate your ‘loss of face’.

Ignorance is bliss.

However, as in my previous correspondence, I am going to leave the choices you make on your shoulders.

Satsiriakalji,

Avtar

April 2013. Vaisakhi @ Parliament; Self-Rule (sent to Baba Iqbal Singhji)

Baba Iqbal Singhji

The Kalgidhar Society, Baru Sahib via Rajgarh, Teh: Pachhard, Dist: Sirmore, Himachal Pardesh, 173101, India

Satsiriakal,

Re:  2013 Vasakhi Parliament & Shepherds Bush Feedback 

I hope this communication finds you physically well and emotionally healthy.

The Communiqué: 

 POINT ONE:

As an experienced figurehead, you began life as and have faithfully remained a sevadar, thus I am sure you will receive the following observation with an open mind, using the pointers tabled to improve your delivery and focus a purpose along a set of sensible attainable targets at a personal and communal level.

The Vasakhi television coverage from the UK parliament of your address left an imprint that the leading light of an embryonic education establishment lacked gravity in the opinion expressed. Your address came across as rambling rant. The fault for this is with your minders in the media. However, the saddest part of the Sikh media is that they are woodcutters detailed to produce exquisite fine royal china tableware. Unfortunately they neither have the talent nor the magnanimous nature to realise that they are not professional trained media journalistic quality capable.

However, it is their duty to make sure that you were aware of the question put to you and then your speech carefully chosen and your voice trained for a steady delivery of the rehearsed speech.

How sad.

However, sadness as a noun or sad as an adjective is a condemnation for the grand design a powerless politically naive community can ill afford. I am sorry but this is not good enough. In future, please, have the awareness not to say anything or limit your utterance to a few words only. Please be aware that speaking on a political stage is not the same as an emotional ramble on a gurdwara stage that you are experienced at.

POINT TWO:

I watched the opening of your speech from Sheperds Bush Gurdwara. You stated that the Jews following the second European war of the 20th century (2nd world war) announced that self-rule was an imperative requirement for the survival of their race and community. In fact each and every community-race expresses the same notion and desires self governance. Please talk to the Kurds, the minorities caught in Myanmar, the Coptic communities in Egypt or indeed the Sámi people of the artic region, and finally the Eskimo community-race. In this, let us not leave behind the indigenous races of north and south America or the aborigines of Australia. They all want the same, but why did it work for the Jews?

Traditionally, the Jews are a hated community regardless of which country they operate and flourish. They are always the entrepreneurs, but by default, as mainstream would not give them jobs. Through their enterprising survivalist skills they eventually became moneylenders. And historically have been accused of underhand dealings, which then resulted in their global persecution.

The Jews in Europe interbred with the European races to a point that they have lost their original racial skin colour. The original Jews had rich pigment than the current modern European Jews. The European Jews changed their names, and hidden behind that deceit they automatically attained high prestige office and authority, nevertheless, when their background was uncovered they were despised.

In addition to the skin camouflage, they through cultural dilution adopted the following changes after massive internal hemorrhage: Historically, the Arab dress mimics the traditional Jewish attire. However, the Jews stood out in the new countries of Europe and therefore the men had to copy their clothing to secure basic jobs. This led to them rejecting the skull cap in public. The women lacking self-esteem and personal inferiority complex argued successfully by refusing to wear clothing that looked alien in the new communities. They argued that head scarf could be replaced by wearing a fashionable wig.

Then they argued, as it was the show of the naked skin of the legs that was against their cultural requirement then why could they not wear thick woolen leggings, and also reduce the length of their skirt. After the second European war and the mass availability of nylon stockings and later tights, the Jewish woman rejected the thick leggings also. To this day, the traditional Jewish woman wears a wig when outside the house or when visitors call – hence their natural hair is covered. This change along with the copied accent and the change of name spelling, and its pronunciation, secured empathy within the community they chose to live.

Furthermore, one of the reason that aided their global survival and accomplishment can be seen in practice on the streets of Southall in the manner that the Muslims will only patronize Muslim businesses and the Afghan Sikhs business aid each other as an oath of survival. This collective inter business transaction at the expense of the outsider community eventually tarnished the Jews in the eyes of each and every country they operated.

However, to get rid themselves of the Jews from their midst the Europeans decided to ‘aid’ the formation of an artificial ancestral homeland in Palestine. The Arabs of that area were under British rule. The Arabs were imprisoned for having an offensive weapon. The offensive weapon was no more than household kitchen knife while the European Jews were allowed to carry modern guns. If a Jew killed an Arab, then his word that it was self defence was enough as a mitigating circumstance. However, if an Arab was caught carrying a knife he purchased for his family’s kitchen needs he was jailed without a trial.

The Jewish war of independence was orchestrated by the Europeans, where on one hand the Jews were armed by them and then the British troops made a half hearted attempt to fight and contain them. The British here means regiments of ill armed Arabs led by a British officer who were outgunned and as the Jews had prior knowledge of the defence they were up against – thus the Jews always defeated the British. The British ‘lost’ eventually. Israel was formed. A minority ruled the majority, with a loaded gun at the head of the majority Arabs.

The Europeans succeeded in (hopefully) removing a race they were uncomfortable with and this as a byproduct also has been a boon. In creating Israel, the Europeans have snarled the Arabs in a constant self-defeating war with a community armed to the teeth by the European race. And Israel acts as a proxy army for Race-Europeans interest.

So, Iqbal Singhji, please get your history into perspective before you start announcing half truths as away forward for establishment of a Sikh state.

POINT THREE:

This, the third point is part of the ongoing romantic idealism about Khalistan. Khalistan as a name will never attain statehood. It is not liked and does not carry the same positive vibration and respect as does Panjab. Panjab, as a name has far better chance of attaining statehood. But not Khalistan. In addition, Panjab will only come into fruitition if there are tangle advantage for several world powers in its formation.

In any case, just what is so special about Sikhs that they as a 2% minority should be accorded statehood? What, because they gave their lives? Who asked them for this protection? At that junction were they given cast iron sureties that if they killed themselves defending this that or the other then that would secure statehood? Get real. This is real-time politics and not some village panchayat goodwill gesture being honoured by return. Sikhs got themselves killed on an emotional high, then that was, and to this day is their lookout. Real life politics is clinically hard and emotion-less.

Shocking is it not?

However, let us get back to the drawing board with this demand. Please, secure and read the lengthy document I handed to Jaspal S Bains who is well known figure from Birmingham as the operator owner of a Sikh media paper. That document template is so simple and yet subtle. Sadly the self-delusional Sikh TV owners find me intimidating because I will not tolerate their daft self egotistical nonsense. Yet in me resides a vision that is painful to enact if a formal independent state is required into reality. Whereas they are reenacting 1979 onwards debacle of inciting anger culminating in another iron-fist clampdown in Panjab by India.

The current drugs addiction is not some grand plan by the Delhi seat. It is a direct result of a lost generation  killed in ‘encounters’ who automatically would have chastised, but their small children grew up  discipline-less and then this led to them lacking cohesive knowledge how to bring up their own children, a classic example of weak parenting. Interestingly, the lack of elder authority also witnesses lack of discipline in the young within the animal kingdom too. So let us not blame the Delhi seat for our own failings.

The annoying part is that sitting in the west the 1979 inciters never sent their own sons into the last ‘war of Panjab independence of 1980’s’. Thus, there is no hope of current fathers who are self professed armchair generals inciting independence of Panjab all over again ever going to send their own son’s to a new war in Panjab. Is there?

Harsh realities have to be faced. Hypocrisy has to be jettisoned.

I had the privilage of learning then teaching and guiding Hindus, Muslims, Buddhists, Jewish and Christian communities and general ‘non-aligned’ people about spiritual matters. I also gave political insight at a high level. The thing that stood out as a reality within all these communities was abject divisions and mistrust amongst themselves and yet uniformly they envied the unity they see within the Sikhs overall.  The problem with the Sikhs is that they lack the long enrich privilage that I have had. The problems within the Sikhs are veneer cracks and not the deep chasm of all other faith groups. Please tell the last time you heard, currently or historically, of Sikhs army fighting Sikh army over internal faith agenda? I repeat we Sikhs do not have the anywhere the same problems the other faiths have.

I have written and spoken often about a non-European constitution for all non-European races. Until that is not in place an independent Panjab is a nonentity.

In any case, the idea that utopia awaits Sikhs upon independence is just that. A utopian dream. The reality is the same type of indifference government that has existed in Panjab since independence of India is our future in an independent state. The connected will get off scot free. Uprising against the government will occur, and it too will be put down without remorse nor concern for human rights. So what exactly will change other than Sikhs will persecute Sikhs?

This is kaljug Bhai, this is kaljug. Just accept it. In this ‘age’ dog eats dog. There is no peace either way. Dogs regardless who is in power will still eat dog. And that is a truth humanity cannot and will not escape from…

…A Sikh of Guru’s, I remain a sevadar of the panth.

Satsiriakalji.

Avtar

February 2013. Truth through Gossip (sent to Hibernia Road Gurdwara)

The President, Committee & Trustees, Gurdwara Sri Guru Singh Sabha, Alice Way, Hanworth Road, Hounslow, TW3 3UA

Re: Fraud – salacious & unsubstantiated accusations.

Dear Sevadars Ji, Satsiriakalji.

GossipAlthough the letter will concern the entire gurdwara primarily it is the executive & trustees on whom is bestowed the responsibility of cold analysis of the points tabled below.

The Fraud:

If I earned £25K pa, working fulltime for a local authority for 15 years, yet successfully applied for a £220K mortgage claiming an earned income of £85k, would you call that fraud?

If I then housed lodgers in the dwelling, earning £1K per month for over 5 years as I could not afford the repayment of £1250pm on my net salary of  £1450 pm, but did not disclose this income for tax purposes, would you call that tax evasion?

You being law-abiding citizens will be pleased to learn that the person who committed this fraud got ‘found out’ and was forced to sell the house, under market price, and pay back the fraudulent loan and suffer its criminal consequences; and in addition is being chased by the tax authority.

Judgement:

Trustees and executive committee members entertained the person in question, and these individuals took sides with the fraudster, allowing the fraudster to mudsling and run me down. This fraudster fabricates outlandish stories about me in order to discredit me. This fraudster has a history of discrediting persons it dislikes. The gurdwara’s senior personnel were well aware of this person’s past antics but allowed them to malign me maliciously on your premises since some individual senior personnel hold a grudge against me.

I could have sued the entire committee. At that time I did not because Sikhs would have been seen washing their dirty laundry in public. Something I find distasteful.

I will not accept an apology from this gurdwara as commonsense should have been used at the outset of such muck-throwing; sadly commonsense was the one thing missing in the debacle. Instead, this gurdwara committee has exemplified that it is powered by an emotional urge to act, and lacks rationale. Senior members of this gurdwara claimed that due to this person’s unsubstantiated allegations they ‘had enough dirt’ on me to cast aspersions about my character and integrity!

Shame on you.

In future, I suggest that malicious muck-slingers should be guided to seek legal redress for their complaints, and senior gurdwara personnel should refrain from using the gurdwara premises as their own fiefdom for settling score.

If you as a gurdwara have something against me personally then please have the decency to write to me with the accusations and await my response. I am a victim of a lot of grapevine gossip, but as yet not a single person has had the guts to bring anything to me and allow the material to be tested in a court. I wonder why?

Gossip, however salacious, never leads to truth.

I would like to think that all of you are engaged in a duty to the gurus of Sikhism and not your own worship. I pray that you find peace in your seva. But thus far one things stands out about some of the senior sevadars of this gurdwara and that one thing is not very awe-inspiring in my opinion. I am sure you will endeavour to prove me wrong by correcting even the slightest failure you may notice that exists in you, or is brought to your attention, unless you happen to be perfect.

I on the other hand was born imperfect, enjoy being imperfect and live as an imperfection.

Thus, I judge no one.

How about you?

Satsiriakalji,

Avtar