The facebook inspired race hatred Anglo-Saxon with support from their fascists mainland European counterparts are still following me on their social media sites and ran another run in my local high street to see my reaction prior to an attack. This time I informed the police who I understand took decisive action. I thank the UK police for that. I am still capturing the faces of the individuals involved and will begin to post them online as race-hate fascists.

Death Seduces Life: Expanded consciousness & Mental Health 

Romans 6:23 claims the ‘wages of sin is death’. But what of those people who hear voices and go on to commit suicide?

In today’s world, so many kinds of pressure can and do lead to suicide, and they aren’t necessarily always preceded by suicide indicators such as self-harm or socially visible depression. Suicide rates in the United Kingdom are declining, and have been since the highs of the 1980s and 1990s, but they appear more prevalent in the media, and are increasingly talked about in terms of mental health.

Now, death has always seduced life. Rather than bringing fear, panic, terror, and distress, it has always been noted as a welcome mergence of life into death for the individual. But this is only true about natural death. Suicide presents a difficult configuration altogether.

For one thing, suicide appears to transgress the natural relationship between life and death, to sin against the rules. These rules say that life must be lived, endured even, with fortitude and resolution. The gift of life, once given, must not be rejected. To do so is to sin. Such obscene views refuse to countenance the dire predicaments that may lead somebody to punish – or seek release for – themselves, and give their lives over to the disquieting and resonant voices telling them to die.

Rabid disregard for the collapse of a person’s entire personal, social, professional, psychological ecology leads preachers to reduce suicide to sin, and leads colleagues in the workplace to dismiss it as a personality trait, a weakness. Either way suicide is cast as the ultimate in moral turpitude.

The question remains however: What compels people to commit suicide?

Regrettably, the obscene distaste of dealing with the issue, whereby theological thinking is masked by a modern charade of sound-bites, is as useful as holding up a candle to the midday sun.

So why do I not support the view that suicide is a punishment or indeed a sin?

Indulge me; as I explain my position using metaphors and analogies. For me, they deliver scriptural and divine reasoning in simple terms.

To explain the personal hell and conflict of an individual we have to understand concepts of reality using a ‘states of sentience’ construct.

I have a burning desire to drive form London to Tashkent, capital of Uzbekistan. One day I set out. On the ferry across from England to France I meet a party who has traveled from Bristol, a city ninety miles west of London, and who is also heading to Tashkent. Their vehicle is big whereas mine is light and carries just me, my sister and her daughter. There are five routes to Tashkent. We debate their relative merits and ease, and we agree that only two routes suit us given our starting point. Upon alighting the ferry I take the lead and create distance between myself and the Bristol party. I make several leisurely stops on the way. One day, I note the Bristol party in my rear-view mirror. And in the distance, in front of me, I note a vehicle heading towards me from the direction of Tashkent. 

I drive leisurely now, allowing the Bristol party to get close enough to overtake me. As it does the vehicle from Tashkent passes me in the opposite direction. 

In this analogy, the Bristol party represents my past setting off ninety miles behind where I am in London. The Tashkent vehicle is my future – passing me by and heading into my past. The point where we meet is the fulcrum portal, where past, present, and future exchange vital information and energies. 

Depending on which of the three vehicles’ occupants is more dominant, which is more malleable, and which more inert, the exchange will impact them accordingly. But the confluence of their different energies will certainly leave all three parties with a new set of emotional overloads that will need readjusting to.

An unknown truth seldom shared with the general public, but borne out by ethnographies of people and societies around the world, is that the future has already happened and that it shapes and makes the past. The past does not make the future. Furthermore, the past and the future coexist at whatever point is considered the present. 

Another analogy:

Consider a ten storey tower block. The apartments on each floor follow a daily activity pattern, right from the ground floor to the penthouse suite. Individual activity differs, but the dawn-to-dusk, general lifestyle pattern is identical. Wealth and technology are more developed the higher one gets, with the lower floors being poorer and having allotments to grow their own vegetables.

Each floor is a relative future to the one(s) below. Now, if there is an electrical fault then the entire tower suffers, and a collective calamity is experienced; but as the electrical failure takes time to ascend the tower, the timing of each floor and each apartment’s experience of the calamity varies. And if people from an apartment aren’t at home during the electrical failure, and return after it’s been fixed, then of course they will not have suffered at all. Likewise, the higher floors have an independent generator for precisely such mishaps, and they sail through the problem unaware.

This is our actual reality. We are imprisoned as assets into a set layer of karma. Karma is not the action-reaction chain that people believe. That is samskar. Karma is the set-in-stone collection of conditions that cannot be changed: thus, what will be, will be. This is why divine Beings never interfere in the scheme of things. The overall administrator of this is the one Atma. Atma is incorrectly explained as the soul. Soul is antrekarna in eastern thought – the parameters within which the individual organs of anything in a particular plane of existence operate. This means that albeit the organs are identical, the antrekarne, the soul, differs in its expression. In the same way the organs of a person from the future will be similar to ours but its antrekarna, the soul – the internal working mechanism – will differ from ours. 

To return to the three cars from Bristol, London and Tashkent… when they crossed each other, the sharing of that time–space meant all parties carried an indelible mark from the impact. They each experienced a kind of excess, but since they could each only make sense of that excess in their own set operational parameters, one of the parties could interpret it as a sensation to drive in such a manner a to commit suicide. One of the parties, conversely, might experience the exchange of energies as a creative sensation.

Thus, a person who feels compelled to commit suicide is not suffering from mental health problems but from the experience of expanded consciousness, which we all have, and which is in fact our natural birthright to enjoy. 

Mental health, as currently framed and discussed, does not exist. Individuals are experiencing expanded consciousness – an excess of energies – which the current western medical councils do not understand. This is nowhere more evident than in the ever-compendium of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of Mental Disorders, which labels every emergent form of expanded consciousness as a disorder and hence reduces it to ‘mental health’.  

I ask each of you who is feeling suicidal: consider this sensation, this impulse, as the resonance and channeling of past and/or future through you, creating an excess which your organs decipher as suicidal – because the reality is that you are not programmed to commit suicide.

The above is a very simplistic explanation, as I have not added multi-functionality as a component of the explanation and analysis that would help round out our understanding of suicide. With the integrated understanding that multi-functionality provides, a much clearer picture emerges; but that requires a book. 

The Mesmeriser

Throughout human-animal history, humans being animals also, the ability of one mesmerising person, usually a male, to lead his followers into self-immolation or suicide by toxins has been baffling and deeply curious.

The last major incident was in Guyana, when Jones’ followers committed mass suicide using poison. It shocked and repulsed; and left us asking ‘why?’

Historically, of course, humans have at times chosen suicide over subjugation and slavery. However, when it has a mesmeric quality to it, as in Guyana, then suicide is not an escape from something so much as an escape to something – utopia, perhaps.

Which makes you wonder why, if there is a utopia out there, we take birth in this hellhole in the first place? If it’s out there and you can reach out and touch it, enter it, then why not do so before entering this period, this planet, this sequence of events, this life? Save the bother of having to live and then commit suicide.

This quality of utopia, this place that Jones’ followers apparently yearned for, is the same rainbow that fanatics long for, those people who cannot but challenge another’s viewpoint – political, social, religious etc – who cannot countenance anything but the mesmeric quality of their own truth.

They do so with the aim of converting their interlocutors to the fanatics’ version of utopia – meaning, surely, that if everybody across the globe attuned to, and practiced the fanatics’ lifestyle then utopia would reign on earth. Misery, desires, needs, illness and death would be things of the past. Because utopia is precisely that, isn’t it – eternal life and the fulfillment of all desires (no questions asked!)? Just ask the fanatics.

But, to throw a fly in the ointment for a moment….if Buddha and Guru Nanakdevji could not secure nirvana’s utopia here on earth, then what hope is there that the damn thing exists elsewhere?

A telling point is that these enlightened beings were savvy enough to introduce a caveat in defining the brand “utopia” – such that we oughtn’t to think of it as a thing per se, but as the fulfillment of a gradual process, subjectively reached.

And it is on this notion of a subjective utopia that the mesmeriser pegs his most fervent egotistical ambitions. And why not, when at his disposal are the infectious naïve assumptions of the vaguely disenchanted that somehow the morbid provincial dance of comatose suburbia can be transformed by gorging on the glittering stars and shapes of the kaleidoscope and lead to inner emancipation. Old clothes contriving a new look.

In all of this, the role and motive of the mesmeriser becomes the most asked-about question – as if we might uncover the communal human DNA through which humans exercise power or prostrate themselves at its feet, and thereby come to an understanding of how to control the human race.

But in order to really understand the mesmeriser – distinct from the literary obsession with mesmeric individuals and the morbid fascination they incite in their biographers and chroniclers – men have to look deep into their own selves, and there they’ll find the template of the mesmeriser.

That template is one of low self-confidence and esteem. Men of this nature defend the cultural view that woman was created from man’s rib and/or (as in cultures with highly respected religious ethics, such as Hinduism) that woman is the sole of the sandal that they (men) wear.

To be created – out a rib or other body part! – implies that woman was needed? Why was she needed? If for the propagation of the human race, then how did man know this – how did he know that he specifically needed a woman, not a toy or a blow-up doll or another man?

And if, despite knowing that man needs woman, men continue to hold women as inferior beings, let them achieve this feat of ultimate power that puts woman in her rightful place… let them self-immortalise, be cremated, have their ashes scattered into the wind, and then regoup those same ashes to create a baby, a baby who is self-nourishing and grows eventually into an adult man. I’m sorry, was that a “no can do” I heard being muttered in the back row? Oh dear, where’s a woman when you need one?!

The point is that if serious faith and religious ethos can be built on the notion that woman was created from the rib of man, then why do we castigate the mesmeriser who leads his followers into mass suicide in pursuit of this thing called utopia? The only difference between the husband who follows a religious belief system and the mesmeriser is a numbers game.

There lurking in the middle of his open spaced out mind each man will find his own god and his own mega-idiot. But what he will not find is a woman waiting to be created out of his rib who wants to be treated as the sole of his sandal.