Police Desecrate Sikh Gurdwara (West London) and Racially Profile Sikhs Entering Parliament

Facebook-inspired, rate-hate Anglo-Saxons are – with support from fascist European counterparts – still following me on social media. Recently they staged another dry-run on a local high street in London to assess how I would react in the event of a personal and potentially fatal attack against my older sister and myself. This time I informed the police, who, I understand, took decisive action – my thanks to them for doing so. Meanwhile, I continue to capture images of the individuals involved and post these online to expose them as race-hate fascists. 

Desecrating Darbaarsahibji

On 8th December 2018, Gurdwara Singh Sabha in Alice Way, Hounslow was desecrated by approximately 25 Metropolitan police officers, who entered the inner sanctum – addressed respectfully as Darbaarsahibji – wearing shoes, and with their heads uncovered. They did so consciously and with malice aforethought against the edicts of Sikhism. Their actions were designed to insult, denigrate, and demonstrate utter contempt for, Sikhism. 

How do we know the police desecration of Darbaarsahibji was deliberate? 

Because the Metropolitan Police trains and tutors officers in observing correct religious protocol, and paying heed to religious sensitivities and sensibilities. They are culturally aware. Therefore, there is no excuse for the manner in which the police officers entered the Gurdwara’s inner sanctum on 8th December. It can and must be viewed as a premeditated violation against the sacredness of Darbaarsahibji – a malicious cultural attack no less heinous than the Jawalianbagh massacre of Sikhs in 1919 ordered by General Dwyer of the British Army.  

The dispute that was underway at the Gurdwara in Alice Way, Hounslow, and to which the police officers were responding, was an internal Sikh dispute which the congregation should have been left to resolve. Those involved in the affray were barefoot and unarmed; and there was no threat to life. There was, in other words, no emergency. An impassioned disturbance of the peace, perhaps, in the confines of Darbaarsahibji, but nothing else. The situation did not, in any way, therefore call for the police to forego their cultural training – to go in with heads uncovered and shoes on.

The sad fact – illustrated in photographs of the event – is that the police were smiling smugly at having denigrated a Sikh place of worship, as if to say: I have just raped you, your religion, your Guru; and there is fuck all you can do about it.

At a bare minimum, the Metropolitan Police ought to pay for re-carpeting and for everything required to resacralise the holy space of Darbaarsahibji at the Gurdwara in Alice Way. I won’t bother demanding that the officers involved get re-trained in ethnic, cultural, religious etiquette – that’s the standard go-to, a soft way of appeasing victims which does nothing to remove the seed of racism that persists in offenders’ minds.

So what will be the repercussions of the police insult to Sikhism? Those of my ilk know that the spiritual-divine realm will exact punishment. Acts of deliberate desecration by one people against another are always severely punished. In this case, henceforth, the assailants will suffer from a multitude of diseases that which will affect and take the dignity and lives of everybody in their blood- and love-lines.

Ethno-religious profiling at U.K. Parliament

On 7th January 2019, my sister and I visited the U.K. Parliament. It was a break from our usual routes and routines when out and about, which the police monitor via trackers on our car and mobile phones.

But because we were venturing off the beaten track, plainclothes police officers and trained observers were also out in force – standing, walking, sitting at points along our car journey, supposedly inconspicuously, but in fact standing out like the proverbial sore thumb. They provided an extra layer of surveillance, useful for when I – in my mischievousness – manage to escape the tracker, which I did for a few minutes on the day of our visit to Parliament. (Note: counter-surveillance professionals use jamming devices, I just use my wits).

After a few minutes of escape, I resurfaced, and the look on the faces of plainclothes surveillance teams dotted around the landscape was one of pure relief as I went about parking the car and walking to the gates of Parliament to meet the group we were visiting with.

The first male police officer I encountered as we walked to enter looked at me and jabbed a finger at a chart citing prohibited items. No greeting, just that jabbing finger. I acknowledged him, viewed the chart, and walked on, at which point he spoke harshly and menacingly: ‘and no ceremonial knives either.’ I ignored the officer and walked on. I was with a group of mostly senior women citizens, after all, and the visit to Parliament was meant to be a treat which I didn’t want to spoil.

Under other circumstances, I would have engaged the officer directly and robustly about his lying, his deliberate denigration of the Sikh kirpan, and the ethno-religious profiling which framed his actions and words as follows:

  • The Offensive Weapons Act of 2018 is being amended to exclude the Sikh kirpan, as it is expressly a religious item.
  • Prior to the introduction of the law, it has been customarily agreed upon and accepted that the kirpan is religious, and can be carried everywhere by baptised adherents of the Sikh faith as one of the five kakkars.
  • Racial profiling is illegal.  

I did not, for reasons explained above, engage the offending police officer on these points. I simply walked on to security. There white people were asked to walk through one security channel, while everybody else was made to walk through another channel. 

The segregation was palpable.

Now, from experience at every security checkpoint I have ever been through, I know to pack an overloaded bag. For this simple reason: carrying only a small wallet, which is my preference, inevitably results somewhere along the line after security has been passed in my being body-searched, often – as happens at airports to most if not all non race-Europeans – invasively and verging on sexual abuse.

To avoid that, I stuff a bag full of items that has to be opened by security, so that if pat-downs occur they are part of the necessary process and not an explicit and smug violation. What can I say, I like to control the situation as much as possible. It gives me power, and takes away power from others to choose to violate me. Plus, it’s fun watching security jumping through hoops. 

At Parliament, everything at security went to plan: smug white officer smiling broadly at his colleagues around him as he announced that my stuffed bag needs to be opened and searched; all the officers beaming, collectively thinking probably that this ‘humiliation’ was as good as raping my mother; me succumbing, safe in the knowledge that the officer hadn’t had the chance this time to arbitrarily pick me out to be body-searched, and get an even bigger kick.

So, security navigated, we entered Parliament and took the 90minute tour. Eagle-eyed and observant as ever, I was able to make the following assessment of the officers who guard Parliament. It’s quite sobering…

Every officer inside Parliament looks like a sugar-puff. They collectively look to be suffering from a concoction of diseases, including diabetes, kidney problems, high cholesterol and heart problems. They appeared too unfit to walk 100 metres at a very brisk pace, let alone run more than 10 yards without gasping for air. The entire security personnel and apparatus in the U.K. Parliament could be overrun by ten adequately trained men in an attempted takeover. Armed officers I saw on my visit only appear bullish – they’d flee at the first sign of being overwhelmed. Helicopters hovering above the building would be powerless to do anything in response to the action unfolding inside. 

Parliament security is often referred to as a ‘ring of steel’. It is no such thing. Here is how to safeguard Parliament: using the same equipment and funds, replace the current personnel with Sikhs. Remove the concrete barriers around Parliament – they stink of fear and self-defeat. Remove signs prohibiting this and that – they read as ‘we, the race-Europeans are scared of you’. Allow free and unfettered access to Parliament for all. Nobody is going to attack with Sikhs on guard – their reputation for putting down aggressors is a matter of significant historical record; and one that the British colonizers relied on (along with that of the Nepali Gurkhas) to save their asses in war. It doesn’t say much for the current police safeguarding democracy if an officer could be so easily killed, as happened in London last year. (Unless you believe  that the death was collateral damage by a police force seeking to justify its demands for more funding). 

Let’s face it, current so-called security at Parliament is all smoke and mirrors, It is peopled by officers put out to grazing on soft operational duty, because they simply aren’t good enough to join the force outside or because they’re counting down the clock to retirement and a healthy pension. It is an absolute insult to the offices of the Prime Minister, the Cabinet, and all elected and non-elected members of Parliament – and to the so called bastion of western democracy!